Standing wave

standing wavesstationary wavestandingstationary wavesinvisible sonic force fieldnatural vibratorstanding light wavestanding-wavestationarywaves
In physics, a standing wave, also known as a stationary wave, is a wave which oscillates in time but whose peak amplitude profile does not move in space.wikipedia
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Wave

travelling wavewavestraveling wave
In physics, a standing wave, also known as a stationary wave, is a wave which oscillates in time but whose peak amplitude profile does not move in space.
If the relative amplitude of oscillation at different points in the field remains constant, the wave is said to be a standing wave.

River surfing

surfersriver surfersrivers
Many standing river waves are popular river surfing breaks.
River surfing is the sport of surfing either standing waves, tidal bores or upstream waves in rivers.

Node (physics)

nodenodesantinode
The locations at which the amplitude is minimum are called nodes, and the locations where the amplitude is maximum are called antinodes.
A node is a point along a standing wave where the wave has minimum amplitude.

Hydraulic jump

hydraulicleaping weirstilling basin
Standing waves and hydraulic jumps also form on fast flowing river rapids and tidal currents such as the Saltstraumen maelstrom.
When this occurs, the water slows in a rather abrupt rise (a step or standing wave) on the liquid surface.

Franz Melde

Franz Melde coined the term "standing wave" (German: stehende Welle or Stehwelle) around 1860 and demonstrated the phenomenon in his classic experiment with vibrating strings.
Standing waves were first discovered by Melde, who coined the term "standing wave" (stehende Welle) around 1860.

Gliding

soaringglider pilotglider
Such waves are often exploited by glider pilots.

Resonance

resonantresonant frequencyresonance frequency
The most common cause of standing waves is the phenomenon of resonance, in which standing waves occur inside a resonator due to interference between waves reflected back and forth at the resonator's resonant frequency.
An optical cavity, also called an optical resonator, is an arrangement of mirrors that forms a standing wave cavity resonator for light waves.

Standing wave ratio

VSWRSWRvoltage standing wave ratio
The degree to which the wave resembles either a pure standing wave or a pure traveling wave is measured by the standing wave ratio (SWR).
Impedance mismatches result in standing waves along the transmission line, and SWR is defined as the ratio of the partial standing wave's amplitude at an antinode (maximum) to the amplitude at a node (minimum) along the line.

Signal reflection

reflectionreflectionsreflected
Such a standing wave may be formed when a wave is transmitted into one end of a transmission line and is reflected from the other end by an impedance mismatch, i.e., discontinuity, such as an open circuit or a short.
Impedance discontinuities cause attenuation, attenuation distortion, standing waves, ringing and other effects because a portion of a transmitted signal will be reflected back to the transmitting device rather than continuing to the receiver, much like an echo.

Wavelength

wavelengthswave lengthsubwavelength
It is the distance between consecutive corresponding points of the same phase on the wave, such as two adjacent crests, troughs, or zero crossings, and is a characteristic of both traveling waves and standing waves, as well as other spatial wave patterns.

Resonator

resonant cavitycavity resonatorresonators
The most common cause of standing waves is the phenomenon of resonance, in which standing waves occur inside a resonator due to interference between waves reflected back and forth at the resonator's resonant frequency.
The oppositely moving waves interfere with each other, and at its resonant frequencies reinforce each other to create a pattern of standing waves in the resonator.

Optical cavity

optical resonatorlaser cavitycavity
Standing waves are also observed in optical media such as optical wave guides, optical cavities, etc.
An optical cavity, resonating cavity or optical resonator is an arrangement of mirrors that forms a standing wave cavity resonator for light waves.

Impedance matching

matching networkimpedance matchimpedance mismatch
Such a standing wave may be formed when a wave is transmitted into one end of a transmission line and is reflected from the other end by an impedance mismatch, i.e., discontinuity, such as an open circuit or a short.
The reflection creates a standing wave if there is reflection at both ends of the transmission line, which leads to further power waste and may cause frequency-dependent loss.

Microbarom

microbaroms
These may form near storm centres, or from reflection of a swell at the shore, and are the source of microbaroms and microseisms.
which produce the required standing wave conditions, also known as the clapotis.

Faraday wave

Faraday wavesFaraday instabilitystanding waves
The Faraday wave is a non-linear standing wave at the air-liquid interface induced by hydrodynamic instability.
Faraday waves, also known as Faraday ripples, named after Michael Faraday, are nonlinear standing waves that appear on liquids enclosed by a vibrating receptacle.

Seismic wave

seismic wavesseismic velocitybody wave
Standing surface waves on the Earth are observed as free oscillations of the Earth.
Free oscillations of the Earth are standing waves, the result of interference between two surface waves traveling in opposite directions.

Physics

physicistphysicalphysicists
In physics, a standing wave, also known as a stationary wave, is a wave which oscillates in time but whose peak amplitude profile does not move in space.

Amplitude

peak-to-peakintensityvolume
The peak amplitude of the wave oscillations at any point in space is constant with time, and the oscillations at different points throughout the wave are in phase. For waves of equal amplitude traveling in opposing directions, there is on average no net propagation of energy.

Michael Faraday

FaradayFaraday, MichaelM. Faraday
Standing waves were first noticed by Michael Faraday in 1831.

Wave interference

interferenceconstructive interferencedestructive interference
This phenomenon can occur because the medium is moving in the opposite direction to the wave, or it can arise in a stationary medium as a result of interference between two waves traveling in opposite directions.

Average

Rushing averageReceiving averagemean
For waves of equal amplitude traveling in opposing directions, there is on average no net propagation of energy.

Flux

flux densityion fluxflow
For waves of equal amplitude traveling in opposing directions, there is on average no net propagation of energy.

Lee wave

lee wavesmountain wavemountain waves
As an example of the first type, under certain meteorological conditions standing waves form in the atmosphere in the lee of mountain ranges.

Rapids

rapidfallsRapid Bus
Standing waves and hydraulic jumps also form on fast flowing river rapids and tidal currents such as the Saltstraumen maelstrom.

Saltstraumen

Saltstraum
Standing waves and hydraulic jumps also form on fast flowing river rapids and tidal currents such as the Saltstraumen maelstrom.