A report on Standing wave

Animation of a standing wave ( red ) created by the superposition of a left traveling ( blue ) and right traveling ( green ) wave
Longitudinal standing wave
Transient analysis of a damped traveling wave reflecting at a boundary
Standing wave in stationary medium. The red dots represent the wave nodes.
A standing wave (black) depicted as the sum of two propagating waves traveling in opposite directions (red and blue).
Electric force vector (E) and magnetic force vector (H) of a standing wave.
Standing waves in a string – the fundamental mode and the first 5 harmonics.
A standing wave on a circular membrane, an example of standing waves in two dimensions. This is the fundamental mode.
A higher harmonic standing wave on a disk with two nodal lines crossing at the center.

Wave that oscillates in time but whose peak amplitude profile does not move in space.

- Standing wave
Animation of a standing wave ( red ) created by the superposition of a left traveling ( blue ) and right traveling ( green ) wave

16 related topics with Alpha

Overall

A Ventus 2 glider landing while jettisoning water that has been carried as ballast

Gliding

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Recreational activity and competitive air sport in which pilots fly unpowered aircraft known as gliders or sailplanes using naturally occurring currents of rising air in the atmosphere to remain airborne.

Recreational activity and competitive air sport in which pilots fly unpowered aircraft known as gliders or sailplanes using naturally occurring currents of rising air in the atmosphere to remain airborne.

A Ventus 2 glider landing while jettisoning water that has been carried as ballast
The "gull wing" Göppingen Gö 3 Minimoa produced in Germany from 1936
Good gliding weather: Competitors studying cumulus humilis, which suggest active thermals and light winds.
A Scimitar glider ridge soaring in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania USA
A lenticular cloud produced by a mountain wave
Schematic cross section through a sea breeze front. If the air inland is moist, cumulus often marks the front.
Aerotowing of a Grob G103 Twin Astir II glider by a Robin DR400-180R
A DG1000 being winch-launched
A typical winch
A bungee launch at the Long Mynd by the Midland Gliding Club
Glider on a cross-country flight in the Alps
Competition grid at Lasham Airfield in 2009
The FAI Diamond Badge
Glider and its trailer after an outlanding
ASH25M—a self-launching two-seater glider
S-1 Swift—modern aerobatic glider
A Schleicher ASK 13, a typical training glider

wave lift (standing waves in the atmosphere, analogous to the ripples on the surface of a stream).

A Rubens tube setup

Rubens tube

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A Rubens tube setup
Flame height on a Rubens tube (without standing sound wave) for different flows of natural gas. Dashed line is linear fit.
Square root of the pressure difference between inside and outside of Rubens tube (without standing sound wave) for different flows of natural gas. Dashed line is linear fit.

A Rubens tube, also known as a standing wave flame tube, or simply flame tube, is a physics apparatus for demonstrating acoustic standing waves in a tube.

Time-domain reflectometer for electrical cable fault detection

Signal reflection

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Transmitted along a transmission medium, such as a copper cable or an optical fiber.

Transmitted along a transmission medium, such as a copper cable or an optical fiber.

Time-domain reflectometer for electrical cable fault detection

Impedance discontinuities cause attenuation, attenuation distortion, standing waves, ringing and other effects because a portion of a transmitted signal will be reflected back to the transmitting device rather than continuing to the receiver, much like an echo.

Wave groups generated by waves with opposing directions. The blue curve is the sum of the red and black. In the animation, watch the crests with the red and black dots. These crests move with the phase speed of linear water waves, but the groups propagate much faster. ([[:File:Group minus.gif|Animation]])

Microbarom

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In acoustics, microbaroms, also known as the "voice of the sea", are a class of atmospheric infrasonic waves generated in marine storms by a non-linear interaction of ocean surface waves with the atmosphere.

In acoustics, microbaroms, also known as the "voice of the sea", are a class of atmospheric infrasonic waves generated in marine storms by a non-linear interaction of ocean surface waves with the atmosphere.

Wave groups generated by waves with opposing directions. The blue curve is the sum of the red and black. In the animation, watch the crests with the red and black dots. These crests move with the phase speed of linear water waves, but the groups propagate much faster. ([[:File:Group minus.gif|Animation]])
Pressure field in the ocean and atmosphere associated to groups made by opposing wave trains. Left: short wave groups giving oblique propagation in the atmosphere. Right: long wave groups giving nearly vertical propagation in the atmosphere.
Acoustic power per solid angle radiated as microbarom by ocean waves. Left: log scale as a function of the elevation angle (zero is vertical). Right: linear scale in polar coordinates.

which produce the required standing wave conditions, also known as the clapotis.

300 px

Faraday wave

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300 px

Faraday waves, also known as Faraday ripples, named after Michael Faraday (1791–1867), are nonlinear standing waves that appear on liquids enclosed by a vibrating receptacle.

Body waves and surface waves

Seismic wave

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Seismic waves are waves of acoustic energy that travel through the Earth.

Seismic waves are waves of acoustic energy that travel through the Earth.

Body waves and surface waves
p-wave and s-wave from seismograph
Velocity of seismic waves in Earth versus depth. The negligible S-wave velocity in the outer core occurs because it is liquid, while in the solid inner core the S-wave velocity is non-zero
The sense of motion for toroidal 0T1 oscillation for two moments of time.
The scheme of motion for spheroidal 0S2 oscillation.Dashed lines give nodal (zero) lines. Arrows give the sense of motion.
Earthquake wave paths
The hypocenter/epicenter of an earthquake is calculated by using the seismic data of that earthquake from at least three different locations. The hypocenter/epicenter is found at the intersection of three circles centered on three observation stations, here shown in Japan, Australia and the United States. The radius of each circle is calculated from the difference in the arrival times of P- and S-waves at the corresponding station.
P- and S-waves sharing with the propagation

Free oscillations of the Earth are standing waves, the result of interference between two surface waves traveling in opposite directions.