Staphylococcus aureus

S. aureusstaph infectionStaph. aureusgolden staphmethicillin-sensitive ''Staphylococcus aureusMethicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureusMSSAStaph aureusstaphylococcalStaphylococcus
Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive, round-shaped bacterium that is a member of the Firmicutes, and it is a usual member of the microbiota of the body, frequently found in the upper respiratory tract and on the skin.wikipedia
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Protein A

staphylococcal Protein Acell-surface proteinProtein-A
Pathogenic strains often promote infections by producing virulence factors such as potent protein toxins, and the expression of a cell-surface protein that binds and inactivates antibodies.
Protein A is a 42 kDa surface protein originally found in the cell wall of the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus.

Impetigo

impetigo contagiosaImpetigineimpetiginous lesion
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
It is typically due to either Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes.

Boil

boilsfurunclefurunculosis
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
It is most commonly caused by infection by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, resulting in a painful swollen area on the skin caused by an accumulation of pus and dead tissue.

Skin flora

skin microbiotacutaneous floramicrobiome
aureus'' which can be found as part of the normal skin flora, in the nostrils, and as a normal inhabitant of the lower reproductive tract of women.
Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were thought from cultural based research to be dominant.

Carbuncle

carbunclescarbunculosiscarbunculous
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
A carbuncle is a cluster of boils caused by bacterial infection, most commonly with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes.

Cellulitis

pelvic cellulitisAnaerobic cellulitisbacterial skin infection
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
The bacteria most commonly involved are streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus.

Protein

proteinsproteinaceousstructural proteins
Pathogenic strains often promote infections by producing virulence factors such as potent protein toxins, and the expression of a cell-surface protein that binds and inactivates antibodies.
It has been estimated that average-sized bacteria contain about 2 million proteins per cell (e.g. E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus).

Exotoxin

exotoxinstoxintoxins
Pathogenic strains often promote infections by producing virulence factors such as potent protein toxins, and the expression of a cell-surface protein that binds and inactivates antibodies.
The best-characterized superantigens are those produced by the strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes that cause toxic shock syndrome.

Toxic shock syndrome

toxic shockStreptococcal toxic shock syndromeendotoxic shock
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
TSS is typically caused by bacteria of the Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus type, though others may also be involved.

Osteomyelitis

bone infectionboneosteomylitis
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
Staphylococcus aureus is the organism most commonly isolated from all forms of osteomyelitis.

Folliculitis

bacterial folliculitishair follicle inflammation
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
Most carbuncles, boils, and other cases of folliculitis develop from Staphylococcus aureus.

Pneumonia

bronchopneumoniabronchial pneumoniaNecrotizing pneumonia
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis. Joint replacements put a person at particular risk of septic arthritis, staphylococcal endocarditis (infection of the heart valves), and pneumonia.
Other commonly-isolated bacteria include Haemophilus influenzae in 20%, Chlamydophila pneumoniae in 13%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in 3% of cases; Staphylococcus aureus; Moraxella catarrhalis; Legionella pneumophila; and Gram-negative bacilli.

Sinusitis

sinus infectionrhinosinusitischronic sinusitis
aureus'' usually acts as a commensal of the human microbiota it can also become an opportunistic pathogen, being a common cause of skin infections including abscesses, respiratory infections such as sinusitis, and food poisoning.
The most common microbial causes are anaerobic bacteria and S. aureus.

Virulence factor

virulence factorsfactorsimmunoevasive
Pathogenic strains often promote infections by producing virulence factors such as potent protein toxins, and the expression of a cell-surface protein that binds and inactivates antibodies.
Some bacteria, such as Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, produce a variety of enzymes which cause damage to host tissues.

Pimple

pimplespimple-likespots
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
The sebaceous gland continues to produce sebum, which builds up behind the blockage, allowing bacteria to grow in the area, including the species Staphylococcus aureus and Cutibacterium acnes, which causes inflammation and infection.

Skin infection

skinbacterial skin infectioncutaneous
aureus'' usually acts as a commensal of the human microbiota it can also become an opportunistic pathogen, being a common cause of skin infections including abscesses, respiratory infections such as sinusitis, and food poisoning.

Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome

Scalded skin syndromePemphigus neonatorum
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.
Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is a dermatological condition caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

Antimicrobial resistance

antibiotic resistanceresistanceresistant
The emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of ''S.
Penicillinase may have emerged as a defense mechanism for bacteria in their habitats, such as the case of penicillinase-rich Staphylococcus aureus, living with penicillin-producing Trichophyton; however, this may be circumstantial.

Septic arthritis

infectious arthritisjoint infectionjoint infections
Joint replacements put a person at particular risk of septic arthritis, staphylococcal endocarditis (infection of the heart valves), and pneumonia.

Foodborne illness

food poisoningptomaineptomaine poisoning
aureus'' usually acts as a commensal of the human microbiota it can also become an opportunistic pathogen, being a common cause of skin infections including abscesses, respiratory infections such as sinusitis, and food poisoning.
Symptom appearance varies with the toxin but may be rapid in onset, as in the case of enterotoxins of Staphylococcus aureus in which symptoms appear in one to six hours.

Coagulase

coagulase-negativecoagulase testcoagulase negative
aureus'' infection by the means of coagulase testing, which enables detection of an enzyme produced by the bacterium.
Importantly, S. aureus is generally coagulase-positive, meaning that a positive coagulase test would indicate the presence of ''S.

Infective endocarditis

bacterial endocarditisinfectious endocarditisAcute infective endocarditis
aureus'' is one of the most common causes of bacteremia and infective endocarditis.
Staphylococcus aureus followed by Streptococci of the viridans group and coagulase negative Staphylococci are the three most common organisms responsible for infective endocarditis.

Abscess

abscessespustularCutaneous abscess
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis. aureus'' usually acts as a commensal of the human microbiota it can also become an opportunistic pathogen, being a common cause of skin infections including abscesses, respiratory infections such as sinusitis, and food poisoning.
In those cases of abscess which do require antibiotic treatment, Staphylococcus aureus bacteria is a common cause and an anti-staphylococcus antibiotic such as flucloxacillin or dicloxacillin is used.

List of microbiota species of the lower reproductive tract of women

vaginal microbiotaMicrobiota of the lower reproductive tract of womeninhabitant
aureus'' which can be found as part of the normal skin flora, in the nostrils, and as a normal inhabitant of the lower reproductive tract of women.

Toxic shock syndrome toxin

TSST-1Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1TSST
Toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST) is a superantigen with a size of 22 kDa produced by 5 to 25% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates.