Staple food

staplestaplesstaple cropstaple foodsstaple dietfood staplesfood staplestaple dishstaple cropsstaple grain
A staple food, food staple, or simply a staple, is a food that is eaten routinely and in such quantities that it constitutes a dominant portion of a standard diet for a given people, supplying a large fraction of energy needs and generally forming a significant proportion of the intake of other nutrients as well.wikipedia
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Food

foodstufffood productsfoods
A staple food, food staple, or simply a staple, is a food that is eaten routinely and in such quantities that it constitutes a dominant portion of a standard diet for a given people, supplying a large fraction of energy needs and generally forming a significant proportion of the intake of other nutrients as well.
Cereal grain is a staple food that provides more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop.

Cereal

graincerealsgrains
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.
Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop and are therefore staple crops.

Wheat

cornTriticumdwarf wheat
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.
Wheat is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.

Maize

corncorn (maize)Zea mays
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.
Maize has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with the total production of maize surpassing that of wheat or rice.

List of root vegetables

root vegetableroot vegetablesroot crop
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.
Of particular economic importance are those with a high carbohydrate concentration in the form of starch; starchy root vegetables are important staple foods, particularly in tropical regions, overshadowing cereals throughout much of Central Africa, West Africa and Oceania, where they are used directly or mashed to make fufu or poi.

Sago

pearl sagolandangsago pearl
Other staple foods include pulses (dried legumes), sago (derived from the pith of the sago palm tree), and fruits (such as breadfruit and plantains).
It is a major staple food for the lowland peoples of New Guinea and the Moluccas, where it is called saksak, rabia and sagu.

Cooking banana

plantainplantainscooking plantain
Other staple foods include pulses (dried legumes), sago (derived from the pith of the sago palm tree), and fruits (such as breadfruit and plantains).
Cooking bananas are a major food staple in West and Central Africa, the Caribbean islands, Central America, and northern, coastal parts of South America.

Sorghum

broomcornJawarmilo
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.
Most varieties are drought- and heat-tolerant, and are especially important in arid regions, where the grain is one of the staples for poor and rural people.

Potato

potatoesSolanum tuberosumIrish potatoes
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.
Today they are a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world's food supply.

Breadfruit

Bread fruitbreadfruit treeArtocarpus altilis
Other staple foods include pulses (dried legumes), sago (derived from the pith of the sago palm tree), and fruits (such as breadfruit and plantains).
In addition to the fruit serving as a staple food in many cultures, the light, sturdy timber of breadfruit has been used for outriggers, ships, and houses in the tropics.

Colocasia esculenta

tarococoyamtaro root
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.
Kalo is a traditional staple of the native cuisine of Hawaii.

Cassava

maniocyucamandioca
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.
Cassava is a major staple food in the developing world, providing a basic diet for over half a billion people.

Oat

oatsaveninAvena sativa
Regional staples include the plants rye, soybeans, barley, oats, and teff.
In China, particularly in western Inner Mongolia and Shanxi province, oat (Avena nuda) flour called youmian is processed into noodles or thin-walled rolls, and is consumed as staple food.

Quinoa

C. quinoakinwaquinua
Some foods like quinoa—a pseudocereal grain that originally came from the Andes—were also staples centuries ago.
It has been an important staple in the Andean cultures, where the plant is indigenous, but relatively obscure to the rest of the world.

Bread

breadsbreadmakingleavened bread
Rice is most commonly cooked and eaten as separate entire grains, but most other staple cereals are milled into a flour or meal that can be used to make bread, noodles, pasta, porridge and mushes like mealie pap.
Bread is a staple food prepared from a dough of flour and water, usually by baking.

Commercial sorghum

sorghummilokaoliang
Sorghum has been, for centuries, one of the most important staple foods for millions of poor rural people in the semiarid tropics of Asia and Africa.

Amaranth grain

amaranthgrain amaranth
Oca tubers, ulluku tubers and grain amaranth are other foods claimed to be historical Andean staples.
The grain was a staple food of the Aztecs and an integral part of Aztec religious ceremonies.

Flour

farinaceouswhite flourmeal
Rice is most commonly cooked and eaten as separate entire grains, but most other staple cereals are milled into a flour or meal that can be used to make bread, noodles, pasta, porridge and mushes like mealie pap.
Cereal flour is the main ingredient of bread, which is a staple food for most cultures.

Noodle

noodlesegg noodleegg noodles
Rice is most commonly cooked and eaten as separate entire grains, but most other staple cereals are milled into a flour or meal that can be used to make bread, noodles, pasta, porridge and mushes like mealie pap.
Noodles are a staple food in many cultures.

Arecaceae

palmpalm treepalms
Other staple foods include pulses (dried legumes), sago (derived from the pith of the sago palm tree), and fruits (such as breadfruit and plantains).
Some indigenous groups living in palm-rich areas use palms to make many of their necessary items and food. Sago, for example, a starch made from the pith of the trunk of the sago palm Metroxylon sagu, is a major staple food for lowland peoples of New Guinea and the Moluccas. This is not the same plant commonly used as a house plant and called "sago palm".

Pasta

pasta saucepastasDry Pasta
Rice is most commonly cooked and eaten as separate entire grains, but most other staple cereals are milled into a flour or meal that can be used to make bread, noodles, pasta, porridge and mushes like mealie pap.
Pasta is a staple food of traditional Italian cuisine, with the first reference dating to 1154 in Sicily.

Fufu

foofoofoufouAchu
Root vegetables can be mashed and used to make porridge-like dishes such as poi and fufu.
Fufu (variants of the name include foofoo, fufuo, foufou) is a staple food common in many countries in West Africa such as Sierra Leone, Ghana, Liberia and Nigeria.

Barley

malting barleysix-row barleyH. vulgare
Regional staples include the plants rye, soybeans, barley, oats, and teff.
Tibetan barley has been a staple food in Tibetan cuisine since the fifth century CE. This grain, along with a cool climate that permitted storage, produced a civilization that was able to raise great armies.

Poi (food)

poi
Root vegetables can be mashed and used to make porridge-like dishes such as poi and fufu.
Poi is primarily the traditional staple food in native cuisine of Hawaii, made from the underground plant stem or corm of the taro plant (known in Hawaiian as kalo).

Ugali

papsadzansima
Rice is most commonly cooked and eaten as separate entire grains, but most other staple cereals are milled into a flour or meal that can be used to make bread, noodles, pasta, porridge and mushes like mealie pap.
It is the most common staple starch featured in the local cuisines of the African Great Lakes region and Southern Africa.