Starch

starcheswheat starchrice starchamylfood starchstarchedamylumblue starchC22 Starchdietary starches
Starch or amylum is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds.wikipedia
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Potato

potatoesSolanum tuberosumIrish potatoes
It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods like potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice, and cassava.
The potato is a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum tuberosum.

Carbohydrate

carbohydratessaccharidecomplex carbohydrates
Starch or amylum is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds.
The term is most common in biochemistry, where it is a synonym of 'saccharide', a group that includes sugars, starch, and cellulose.

Polysaccharide

polysaccharidescomplex carbohydratesheteropolysaccharide
This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as energy storage.
Examples include storage polysaccharides such as starch and glycogen, and structural polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin.

Cassava

maniocyucamandioca
It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods like potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice, and cassava.
It is extensively cultivated as an annual crop in tropical and subtropical regions for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrates.

Beer

brewing industrybeersbrewing
In industry, starch is converted into sugars, for example by malting, and fermented to produce ethanol in the manufacture of beer, whisky and biofuel.
During the brewing process, fermentation of the starch sugars in the wort produces ethanol and carbonation in the resulting beer.

Malt

malted barleymalt extractbarley malt
In industry, starch is converted into sugars, for example by malting, and fermented to produce ethanol in the manufacture of beer, whisky and biofuel.
Malting grains develop the enzymes required for modifying the grain's starches into various types of sugar, including monosaccharide glucose, disaccharide maltose, trisaccharide maltotriose, and higher sugars called maltodextrines.

Plant

plantsfloraplant kingdom
This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as energy storage.
With a few exceptions, the green plants have the following features in common; primary chloroplasts derived from cyanobacteria containing chlorophylls a and b, cell walls containing cellulose, and food stores in the form of starch contained within the plastids.

Amylose

It consists of two types of molecules: the linear and helical amylose and the branched amylopectin.
It is one of the two components of starch, making up approximately 20-30%.

Biofuel

biofuelsbio-fuelbio-fuels
In industry, starch is converted into sugars, for example by malting, and fermented to produce ethanol in the manufacture of beer, whisky and biofuel.
Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermentation, mostly from carbohydrates produced in sugar or starch crops such as corn, sugarcane, or sweet sorghum.

Wheatpaste

wheat pastewheatpastingpaste
Mixing most starches in warm water produces a paste, such as wheatpaste, which can be used as a thickening, stiffening or gluing agent.
Wheat paste (also known as flour paste, or simply paste) is a gel or liquid adhesive made from wheat flour or starch and water.

Amylopectin

It consists of two types of molecules: the linear and helical amylose and the branched amylopectin.
It is one of the two components of starch, the other being amylose.

Amyl

It provides the root amyl, which is used as a prefix in biochemistry for several 5-carbon compounds related to or derived from starch (e.g. amyl alcohol).
Amylum or starch, a carbohydrate

Maize

corncorn (maize)Zea mays
It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods like potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice, and cassava.
A genetic variant that accumulates more sugar and less starch in the ear is consumed as a vegetable and is called sweet corn.

Glucose syrup

starch sugar
40% being used for industrial applications and 60% for food uses, most of the latter as glucose syrups.
Glucose syrup, also known as confectioner's glucose, is a syrup made from the hydrolysis of starch.

Inulin

F12 Inulin
An exception is the family Asteraceae (asters, daisies and sunflowers), where starch is replaced by the fructan inulin.
Most plants that synthesize and store inulin do not store other forms of carbohydrate such as starch.

Glycogen

glycogen depositsglycogen (n)glycogen deposits
Glycogen, the glucose store of animals, is a more highly branched version of amylopectin.
Glycogen is the analogue of starch, a glucose polymer that functions as energy storage in plants.

Typha

cattailcattailsbulrush
Starch grains from the rhizomes of Typha (cattails, bullrushes) as flour have been identified from grinding stones in Europe dating back to 30,000 years ago.
Evidence of preserved starch grains on grinding stones suggests they were already eaten in Europe 30,000 years ago.

Rhizome

rhizomatousrhizomesbotanical rhizome
Starch grains from the rhizomes of Typha (cattails, bullrushes) as flour have been identified from grinding stones in Europe dating back to 30,000 years ago. Fruit, seeds, rhizomes, and tubers store starch to prepare for the next growing season.
In general, a tuber is high in starch, e.g. the potato, which is a modified stolon.

Metabolism

metabolicmetabolizedmetabolic pathways
The glucose is used to generate the chemical energy required for general metabolism, to make organic compounds such as nucleic acids, lipids, proteins and structural polysaccharides such as cellulose, or is stored in the form of starch granules, in amyloplasts.
Carbohydrates are the most abundant biological molecules, and fill numerous roles, such as the storage and transport of energy (starch, glycogen) and structural components (cellulose in plants, chitin in animals).

Flour

farinaceouswhite flourmeal
Starch grains from the rhizomes of Typha (cattails, bullrushes) as flour have been identified from grinding stones in Europe dating back to 30,000 years ago.
Flour contains a high proportion of starches, which are a subset of complex carbohydrates also known as polysaccharides.

Potato starch

potato flourpotato starch flourpotato
Each plant species has a unique starch granular size: rice starch is relatively small (about 2 μm) while potato starches have larger granules (up to 100 μm).
Potato starch is starch extracted from potatoes.

Amyloplast

amyloplastsstatoliths
The glucose is used to generate the chemical energy required for general metabolism, to make organic compounds such as nucleic acids, lipids, proteins and structural polysaccharides such as cellulose, or is stored in the form of starch granules, in amyloplasts.
Amyloplasts are found in roots and storage tissues and store and synthesize starch for the plant through the polymerization of glucose.

Starch gelatinization

gelatinizationgelatinizedgelatinize
This process is called starch gelatinization.
Starch gelatinization is a process of breaking down the intermolecular bonds of starch molecules in the presence of water and heat, allowing the hydrogen bonding sites (the hydroxyl hydrogen and oxygen) to engage more water.

Seed

seedsseed coatkernel
Fruit, seeds, rhizomes, and tubers store starch to prepare for the next growing season.
It is usually triploid, and is rich in oil or starch, and protein.

Cellulose

cellulolyticcellulosiccellulose ester
The glucose is used to generate the chemical energy required for general metabolism, to make organic compounds such as nucleic acids, lipids, proteins and structural polysaccharides such as cellulose, or is stored in the form of starch granules, in amyloplasts.
This linkage motif contrasts with that for α(1→4)-glycosidic bonds present in starch and glycogen.