State religion

Established Churchofficial religionestablishedestablished religionstate churchestablishmentnational religiondisestablishmentestablishment of religionofficially established
A state religion (also called an established religion or official religion) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state.wikipedia
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Secular state

secularstate secularismsecular country
A state with an official religion, while not secular, is not necessarily a theocracy, a country whose rulers have both secular and spiritual authority.
Secular states do not have a state religion (e.g. an established religion) or an equivalent, although the absence of an established state religion does not necessarily imply that a state is fully secular or egalitarian in all respects.

State church of the Roman Empire

state religion of the Roman Empirestate religionChristianity
In Christianity, as the term church is typically applied to a Christian place of worship or organisations incorporating such ones, the term state church is associated with Christianity as sanctioned by the government, historically the state church of the Roman Empire in the last centuries of the Empire's existence, and is sometimes used to denote a specific modern national branch of Christianity.
With the Edict of Thessalonica in 380 AD, Emperor Theodosius I made Nicene Christianity the Empire's state religion.

Religion in England

Christianity in EnglandEnglandEnglish Church
The degree to which an official national religion is imposed upon citizens by the state in contemporary society varies considerably; from high as in Saudi Arabia to minimal or none at all as in Denmark, England, Iceland, and Greece.
The Church of England is the established state church in England, whose supreme governor is the monarch.

Religion in Iceland

IcelandChristianity in Icelanddetails
The degree to which an official national religion is imposed upon citizens by the state in contemporary society varies considerably; from high as in Saudi Arabia to minimal or none at all as in Denmark, England, Iceland, and Greece.
Religion in Iceland has been predominantly Christian since the adoption of Christianity as the state religion by the Althing under the influence of Olaf Tryggvason, the king of Norway, in 999/1000 CE.

Theocracy

theocratictheocraciesreligious authority
A state with an official religion, while not secular, is not necessarily a theocracy, a country whose rulers have both secular and spiritual authority.
Theocracy is distinguished from other, secular forms of government that have a state religion, or are influenced by theological or moral concepts, and monarchies held "By the Grace of God".

Religion in Denmark

DenmarkFreedom of religion in DenmarkDanish relationship with religion
The degree to which an official national religion is imposed upon citizens by the state in contemporary society varies considerably; from high as in Saudi Arabia to minimal or none at all as in Denmark, England, Iceland, and Greece.
Religion in Denmark is prominently Christianity in the form of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Denmark (Danish: Folkekirken), the state religion.

Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
This word is, however, most usually associated with the debate on the position of the Anglican churches in the British Isles: the Church of Ireland (disestablished in 1871), the Church of England in Wales (disestablished in 1920), and the Church of England itself (which remains established).
The Church of England (C of E) is the established church of England.

Armenian Apostolic Church

Armenian ApostolicArmenian ChurchArmenian
The first state-sponsored Christian church was the Armenian Apostolic Church, established in 301 CE.
Ancient Armenia's adoption of Christianity as a state religion (the first state to do so) has been referred to by Nina Garsoïan as "probably the most crucial step in its history."

Freedom of religion

religious freedomreligious libertyfreedom of worship
In a country with a state religion, freedom of religion is generally considered to mean that the government permits religious practices of other sects besides the state religion, and does not persecute believers in other faiths.

Cuius regio, eius religio

cujus regio, ejus religioCuius regio eius religiobe assumed
In Europe, competition between Catholic and Protestant denominations for state sponsorship in the 16th century evolved the principle Cuius regio, eius religio (states follow the religion of the ruler) embodied in the text of the treaty that marked the Peace of Augsburg, 1555.
Instead, it gave legitimacy to only two forms of state religion within the Empire, Roman Catholicism and Lutheranism, leaving out other Reformed forms of Christianity (such as Calvinism) and radical systems such as Anabaptism.

Sri Lanka

CeylonCeyloneseDemocratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka
The Sri Lankan constitution accords Buddhism the "foremost place", although it does not identify it as a state religion.

Religion in Greece

Greecechurchesdetails
The degree to which an official national religion is imposed upon citizens by the state in contemporary society varies considerably; from high as in Saudi Arabia to minimal or none at all as in Denmark, England, Iceland, and Greece.
The Greek Orthodox Church, a member of the Eastern Orthodox Communion, is accorded the status of "prevailing religion" in Greece's constitution, and Greece is the only country in the world where an Eastern Orthodox Church is clearly recognized as a state religion.

Article 75 of the Constitution of Costa Rica

article 75Article 75 of the Costa Rican Constitution
The article 75 of the Constitution of Costa Rica establishes Catholicism as the country's state religion making Costa Rica the only state in the Americas to do so.

Separation of church and state

disestablishmentchurch and stateseparation of religion and state
As of 2012, there are only five state churches left, as most countries that once featured state churches have separated the church from their government.
The strict application of secular principle of laïcité (secularity) is used in France, while secular societies, such as Denmark and the United Kingdom, maintain a form of constitutional recognition of an official state religion.

Protestantism

ProtestantProtestantsProtestant church
In Europe, competition between Catholic and Protestant denominations for state sponsorship in the 16th century evolved the principle Cuius regio, eius religio (states follow the religion of the ruler) embodied in the text of the treaty that marked the Peace of Augsburg, 1555.
Roman Catholicism remained the official state religion, and the fortunes of French Protestants gradually declined over the next century, culminating in Louis XIV's Edict of Fontainebleau which revoked the Edict of Nantes and made Roman Catholicism the sole legal religion once again.

Georgian Orthodox Church

Georgian OrthodoxGeorgianEastern Orthodox Church
Orthodox Christianity was the state religion throughout most of Georgia's history until 1921, when it was conquered by the Russian Red Army during the Russian-Georgian War and became part of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.).

Antidisestablishmentarianism

antidisestablishmentarianantidisestablishmentariansdisestablishment of the Irish Church
In a state where an established church is in place, those opposed to such a move may be described as antidisestablishmentarians.
Antidisestablishmentarianism (, US also ) is a political movement that developed in 19th-century Britain in opposition to Disestablishmentarianism, the Liberal Party's efforts to disestablish or remove the Church of England as the official state church of England, Ireland, and Wales.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
Poland's first historically documented ruler, Mieszko I, accepted Christianity under the auspices of the Latin Church with the Baptism of Poland in 966, as the new official religion of his subjects.

Lords Spiritual

Lord SpiritualConvenor of the Lords Spiritualrepresentation
The Lords Spiritual of the United Kingdom are the 26 bishops of the established Church of England who serve in the House of Lords, not counting bishops who sit by right of a peerage.

Church of Denmark

Danish National ChurchLutheranDanish Church
The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Denmark or National Church, sometimes called Church of Denmark (Folkekirken, literally: "the People's Church" or unofficially Den danske folkekirke, literally: "the Danish People's Church"), is the established, state-supported church in Denmark.

Dratshang Lhentshog

Central Monk BodyCentral Monastic BodyGedun Dratshang
Under the 2008 Constitution, it is the bureaucracy that oversees the Drukpa Kagyu sect that is the state religion of Bhutan.

Armenia

ArmenianRepublic of ArmeniaARM
The Kingdom of Armenia reached its height under Tigranes the Great in the 1st century BC and became the first state in the world to adopt Christianity as its official religion in the late 3rd or early 4th century AD.

Church of Ireland

AnglicanProtestantIrish Anglican
This word is, however, most usually associated with the debate on the position of the Anglican churches in the British Isles: the Church of Ireland (disestablished in 1871), the Church of England in Wales (disestablished in 1920), and the Church of England itself (which remains established).
This made oaths a high profile issue, since ministers of the national churches of England, Scotland and Ireland were required to swear allegiance to the ruling monarch.

Constitution of Bhutan

ConstitutionConstitution of 20082008 Constitution
Thus, while religion and politics are officially separate, the Buddhist Drukpa Lineage is the state religion of Bhutan.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
In Christianity, as the term church is typically applied to a Christian place of worship or organisations incorporating such ones, the term state church is associated with Christianity as sanctioned by the government, historically the state church of the Roman Empire in the last centuries of the Empire's existence, and is sometimes used to denote a specific modern national branch of Christianity.
King Trdat IV made Christianity the state religion in Armenia between 301 and 314, thus Armenia became the first officially Christian state.