States Reorganisation Act, 1956

States Reorganisation ActStates Reorganisation Act of 1956linguistic reorganisation of statesreorganisation of Indian statesreorganisedStates Reorganization Act1956 reorganisation of India's statesre-organisation of States along linguistic linesreorganisation of StatesReorganisation of the Indian States
The States Reorganisation Act, 1956 was a major reform of the boundaries of India's states and territories, organising them along linguistic lines.wikipedia
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Madhya Pradesh

Madhya Pradesh StateMPM.P.
In 1956, this state was reorganised and its parts were combined with the states of Madhya Bharat, Vindhya Pradesh and Bhopal to form the new Madhya Pradesh state, the Marathi-speaking Vidarbha region was removed and merged with the then Bombay State.

Vindhya Pradesh

Most were merged into existing provinces; others were organised into new provinces, such as Rajputana, Himachal Pradesh, Madhya Bharat, and Vindhya Pradesh, made up of multiple princely states; a few, including Mysore, Hyderabad, Bhopal, and Bilaspur, became separate provinces.
Vindhya Pradesh was merged into Madhya Pradesh in 1956, following the States Reorganisation Act.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
British India, which included present-day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, was divided into two types of territories: the Provinces of British India, which were governed directly by British officials responsible to the Governor-General of India; and the Indian States, under the rule of local hereditary rulers who recognised British suzerainty in return for their own kingdom, in most cases as established by treaty.
In 1956, under the States Reorganisation Act, states were reorganised on a linguistic basis.

Bombay State

BombayState of BombayBombay Province
On 1 November 1956, Bombay State was re-organized under the States Reorganisation Act on linguistic lines, absorbing various territories including the Saurashtra and Kutch States, which ceased to exist.

Suzerainty

suzerainBritish Paramountcysuzerains
British India, which included present-day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, was divided into two types of territories: the Provinces of British India, which were governed directly by British officials responsible to the Governor-General of India; and the Indian States, under the rule of local hereditary rulers who recognised British suzerainty in return for their own kingdom, in most cases as established by treaty.
In 1956, the States Reorganisation Act separated these islands from the mainland administrative units, forming a new union territory by combining all the islands.

Hyderabad State (1948–56)

Hyderabad StateHyderabadnew Hyderabad State
Following the States Reorganisation Act Hyderabad State was merged with Andhra State in 1956 and renamed Andhra Pradesh.

Mysore State

MysoreState of MysoreGangavadi
Most were merged into existing provinces; others were organised into new provinces, such as Rajputana, Himachal Pradesh, Madhya Bharat, and Vindhya Pradesh, made up of multiple princely states; a few, including Mysore, Hyderabad, Bhopal, and Bilaspur, became separate provinces.
As a result of the States Reorganisation Act on 1 November 1956, the Kannada-speaking districts of Belgaum (except Chandgad taluk), Bijapur, Dharwar, and North Canara were transferred from Bombay State to Mysore State.

Madras State

MadrasGovernment of MadrasMadras Province
The movement to create a Telugu-speaking state out of the northern portion of Madras State gathered strength in the years after independence, and in 1953, the sixteen northern Telugu-speaking districts of Madras State became the new State of Andhra.
As a result of the 1956 States Reorganisation Act, the state's boundaries were re-organized following linguistic lines.

Hyderabad State

HyderabadHyderabad DeccanState of Hyderabad
Most were merged into existing provinces; others were organised into new provinces, such as Rajputana, Himachal Pradesh, Madhya Bharat, and Vindhya Pradesh, made up of multiple princely states; a few, including Mysore, Hyderabad, Bhopal, and Bilaspur, became separate provinces. Bhutan, Hyderabad and Kashmir opted for independence, although the armed intervention of India conquered Hyderabad and brought it into the Indian Union.
In 1956 during the reorganisation of the Indian States based along linguistic lines, the state of Hyderabad was split up among Andhra Pradesh and Bombay state (later divided into states of Maharashtra and Gujarat in 1960 with the original portions of Hyderabad becoming part of the state of Maharashtra) and Karnataka.

Patiala and East Punjab States Union

PEPSUPatiala & East Punjab States Union3rd Chief Minister of PEPSU
On 1 November 1956, PEPSU was merged mostly into Punjab State following the States Reorganisation Act.

Delhi

Delhi, IndiaNational Capital Territory of DelhiNational Capital Territory
The States Reorganisation Act, 1956 created the Union Territory of Delhi from its predecessor, the Chief Commissioner's Province of Delhi.

Coorg State

CoorgCoorgiGovernment of Coorg
Coorg State was abolished on 1 November 1956 as per the States Reorganisation Act, 1956 and its territory were merged with Mysore State (later renamed as Karnataka in 1973).

Ajmer State

AjmerAjmer territory
Following the States Reorganisation Act in 1956 it was merged with Rajasthan.

East Punjab

PunjabEastern PunjabEast
In 1956, the PEPSU was merged into an expanded Punjab state.

Kerala

Kerala stateKerala, Indiastate of Kerala
It was formed on 1 November 1956, following passage of the States Reorganisation Act, by combining Malayalam-speaking regions.

Andhra Pradesh

AndhraAPAndhra Pradesh State
On the basis of the gentlemen's agreement of 1 November 1956, the States Reorganisation Act formed combined Andhra Pradesh by merging Andhra State with the Telugu-speaking areas of the already existing Hyderabad State.

Bhopal State (1949–56)

Bhopal StateBhopal
According to the States Reorganisation Act of 1956, Bhopal state was integrated into the state of Madhya Pradesh, and Bhopal was declared as the capital of the newly formed state.

Kanyakumari district

KanyakumariKanniyakumari districtKanniyakumari
Eventually the merger happened in 1956 based on language reorganization of states.

Govind Ballabh Pant

Govind Vallabh PantPandit Govind Ballabh PantGobind Ballabh Pant
The efforts of the commission were overseen by Govind Ballabh Pant, who served as the Home Minister from December 1954.
As Home Minister, his chief achievement was the re-organisation of States along linguistic lines.

Proposed states and union territories of India

Vidarbha StateBhilistanList of proposed states and territories of India
The colonial system of administration continued until 1956 when the States Reorganisation Act abolished the provinces and princely states in favour of new states which were based on language and ethnicity.

Administrative divisions of India

RegionDivisionMajor villages
Zonal Councils were set up vide Part-III of the States Reorganisation Act, 1956.

Jawaharlal Nehru

NehruPandit Jawaharlal NehruJawahar Lal Nehru
Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru appointed the States Reorganisation Commission in December 1953, with the remit to reorganise the Indian states.
As Home Minister, his chief achievement was the re-organisation of States along linguistic lines.

Lakshadweep

Lakshadweep IslandsLaccadivesUnion Territory of Lakshadweep
On 1 November 1956, during the reorganization of Indian states, the Lakshadweep islands were separated from Madras and organized into a separate union territory for administrative purposes.

States and union territories of India

StateIndian stateUnion Territory
The States Reorganisation Act, 1956 was a major reform of the boundaries of India's states and territories, organising them along linguistic lines.
The States Reorganisation Act of 1956 reorganised the states based on linguistic lines resulting in the creation of the new states.