Statutory instrument (UK)

statutory instrumentstatutory instrumentsHenry VIII clauseOrderS.I.Henry VIII clausesUK Statutory Instrumentannulledcommencement orderlegislative order
For information relating to statutory instruments in other countries see, Statutory instrumentwikipedia
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Statutory Instruments Act 1946

Statutory instruments are governed by the Statutory Instruments Act 1946.
The Statutory Instruments Act 1946 is an Act of the United Kingdom Parliament which governs the making of statutory instruments.

Statutory rules of Northern Ireland

statutory rules
(In Northern Ireland, delegated legislation is organised into statutory rules, rather than statutory instruments.) The advent of devolution in 1999 resulted in many powers to make statutory instruments being transferred to the Scottish and Welsh governments, and oversight to the Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales.
They replaced statutory rules and orders made under the Rules Publication Act (Northern Ireland) 1925 and are comparable with statutory instruments in the rest of the United Kingdom.

Statutory rules and orders

They replaced statutory rules and orders, made under the Rules Publication Act 1893, in 1948.
In Great Britain they were replaced by statutory instruments in 1948 following the passing of the Statutory Instruments Act 1946.

Primary and secondary legislation

primary legislationsecondary legislationdelegated legislation
A statutory instrument (SI) is the principal form in which delegated legislation is made in Great Britain.

Office of Public Sector Information

HMSOHer Majesty's Stationery OfficeHM Stationery Office
Numbers are assigned by Her Majesty's Stationery Office and are sequential within the year of making.
By virtue of holding these offices OPSI publishes, through HMSO, the London Gazette, Edinburgh Gazette, Belfast Gazette and all legislation in the United Kingdom, including Acts of Parliament, Acts of the Scottish Parliament and Statutory Instruments.

Order in Council

Orders in CouncilOrder-in-CouncilOrders-in-Council
In this second case, an Order in Council is merely another form of statutory instrument (in the UK, regulated by the Statutory Instruments Act 1946), albeit subject to more formalities than a simple statutory instrument.

Legislative and Regulatory Reform Act 2006

Legislative and Regulatory Reform Bill
The 2001 Act was repealed and replaced by the Legislative and Regulatory Reform Act 2006, which created significantly wider powers and has been the subject of considerable concern.
As originally drafted, the Bill was controversial, as it would have granted government ministers wide powers to make secondary legislation that could amend, repeal or replace any primary legislation or secondary legislation (known as a Henry VIII clause).

Welsh language

WelshWelsh-languageWelsh-speaking
The list of other public bodies which have to prepare Schemes could be added to by initially the Secretary of State for Wales, from 1993–1997, by way of statutory instrument.

King-in-Council

Queen-in-CouncilGovernor-in-Councilin-Council
A statutory instrument is also used when the Queen in Council or a Minister exercises a power under an Act passed before 1947 which is legislative, rather than executive, in character.
Orders-in-Council may be used to implement secondary legislation such as UK statutory instruments.

Scottish statutory instrument

secondary legislationorderordinance
Instruments made by the Scottish Government are now classed separately as Scottish statutory instruments.
Before this Act, SSIs were governed by the Statutory Instruments Act 1946, which continues to govern UK statutory instruments.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
A statutory instrument (SI) is the principal form in which delegated legislation is made in Great Britain.

Northern Ireland

Northern IrishIrishNIR
(In Northern Ireland, delegated legislation is organised into statutory rules, rather than statutory instruments.) The advent of devolution in 1999 resulted in many powers to make statutory instruments being transferred to the Scottish and Welsh governments, and oversight to the Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales.

Devolution

devolveddevolved governmentdevolve
(In Northern Ireland, delegated legislation is organised into statutory rules, rather than statutory instruments.) The advent of devolution in 1999 resulted in many powers to make statutory instruments being transferred to the Scottish and Welsh governments, and oversight to the Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales.

Scottish Government

Scottish ExecutiveScottish MinistersGovernment of Scotland
(In Northern Ireland, delegated legislation is organised into statutory rules, rather than statutory instruments.) The advent of devolution in 1999 resulted in many powers to make statutory instruments being transferred to the Scottish and Welsh governments, and oversight to the Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales.

Scottish Parliament

ParliamentHolyroodScotland
(In Northern Ireland, delegated legislation is organised into statutory rules, rather than statutory instruments.) The advent of devolution in 1999 resulted in many powers to make statutory instruments being transferred to the Scottish and Welsh governments, and oversight to the Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales.

National Assembly for Wales

Welsh AssemblyNational Assembly of WalesNational Assembly
(In Northern Ireland, delegated legislation is organised into statutory rules, rather than statutory instruments.) The advent of devolution in 1999 resulted in many powers to make statutory instruments being transferred to the Scottish and Welsh governments, and oversight to the Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales.

Welsh Government

Welsh Assembly Governmentdevolved governmentWelsh Ministers
(In Northern Ireland, delegated legislation is organised into statutory rules, rather than statutory instruments.) The advent of devolution in 1999 resulted in many powers to make statutory instruments being transferred to the Scottish and Welsh governments, and oversight to the Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales. Minister of the Crown includes the Welsh Ministers and various Acts provide that delegated legislation, although made by another person (for example, the General Dental Council ), is also to be made by statutory instrument.

General Dental Council

DentalDental Council
Minister of the Crown includes the Welsh Ministers and various Acts provide that delegated legislation, although made by another person (for example, the General Dental Council ), is also to be made by statutory instrument.

Secretary of State (United Kingdom)

Secretary of StateSecretaries of StateBritish Secretary of State
Often the Minister authorised to issue a statutory instrument is "the Secretary of State", which the Interpretation Act 1978 defines as "one of Her Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State"; this form effectively allows the Prime Minister to create new departments and define or redefine their responsibilities at will.

Interpretation Act 1978

Often the Minister authorised to issue a statutory instrument is "the Secretary of State", which the Interpretation Act 1978 defines as "one of Her Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State"; this form effectively allows the Prime Minister to create new departments and define or redefine their responsibilities at will.

Executive (government)

executiveexecutive branchExecutive power
A statutory instrument is also used when the Queen in Council or a Minister exercises a power under an Act passed before 1947 which is legislative, rather than executive, in character.

National Health Service

NHSNational Health Service (NHS)National Health Services
So, for example, an Order providing for the transfer of contracts from one National Health Service body to another may only be notified to the affected bodies, and by-laws made by a local council may be publicised through an announcement in local newspapers.

By-law

bylawsbylawby-laws
So, for example, an Order providing for the transfer of contracts from one National Health Service body to another may only be notified to the affected bodies, and by-laws made by a local council may be publicised through an announcement in local newspapers.