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Steam-powered vessels

steam powered vesselsteam-poweredsteamship
A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels.
Steam-powered vessels include steamboats and steamships.

Paddle steamer

sternwheelersidewheelsidewheel steamer
A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels.
A paddle steamer is a steamship or riverboat powered by a steam engine that drives paddle wheels to propel the craft through the water.

Globalization

globalisationglobalizedglobal
As steamships were less dependent on wind patterns, new trade routes opened up. The steamship has been described as a "major driver of the first wave of trade globalization (1870–1913)" and contributor to "an increase in international trade that was unprecedented in human history."
The steam locomotive, steamship, jet engine, and container ships are some of the advances in the means of transport while the rise of the telegraph and its modern offspring, the Internet and mobile phones show development in telecommunications infrastructure.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Brunelbroad gaugeIsambard Brunel
The first steamship purpose-built for regularly scheduled trans-Atlantic crossings was the British side-wheel paddle steamer built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel in 1838, which inaugurated the era of the trans-Atlantic ocean liner.
Brunel built dockyards, the Great Western Railway, a series of steamships including the first propeller-driven transatlantic steamship, and numerous important bridges and tunnels.

Ship prefix

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Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer (using a propeller or screw).

SS Great Britain

SS ''Great BritainGreat BritainS.S. ''Great Britain
SS Great Britain used chain drive to transmit power from a paddler's engine to the propeller shaft - the result of a late design change to propeller propulsion.
SS Great Britain is a museum ship and former passenger steamship, which was advanced for her time.

SS Great Eastern

Great EasternSS ''Great EasternThe Great Eastern
The Great Eastern had this arrangement fail on her first transatlantic voyage, with very large amounts of uneven wear.
SS Great Eastern was an iron sailing steamship designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, and built by J. Scott Russell & Co. at Millwall Iron Works on the River Thames, London.

Aaron Manby

Mid 19th CenturyThe Aaron Manby
The first iron steamship to go to sea was the 116-ton Aaron Manby, built in 1821 by Aaron Manby at the Horseley Ironworks, and became the first iron-built vessel to put to sea when she crossed the English Channel in 1822, arriving in Paris on 22 June.
Launched in 1821, Aaron Manby was the first steamship to be built of iron.

Ocean liner

linerlinerspassenger liner
The first steamship purpose-built for regularly scheduled trans-Atlantic crossings was the British side-wheel paddle steamer built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel in 1838, which inaugurated the era of the trans-Atlantic ocean liner.
In 1840, Cunard Line’s began its first regular passenger and cargo service by a steamship, sailing from Liverpool to Boston.

Cunard Line

CunardCunard Steamship CompanyCunard White Star Line
The Cunard Line's began her first regular passenger and cargo service by a steamship in 1840, sailing from Liverpool to Boston.
In 1839 Samuel Cunard, a Halifax, Nova Scotia shipowner, was awarded the first British transatlantic steamship mail contract, and the next year formed the British and North American Royal Mail Steam-Packet Company together with Robert Napier, the famous Scottish steamship engine designer and builder, to operate the line's four pioneer paddle steamers on the Liverpool–Halifax–Boston route.

SS Great Western

SS ''Great WesternGreat WesternGreat Western's
After the initial success of its first liner, SS Great Western of 1838, the Great Western Steamship Company assembled the same engineering team that had collaborated so successfully before.
SS Great Western of 1838, was an oak-hulled paddle-wheel steamship, the first steamship purpose-built for crossing the Atlantic, and the initial unit of the Great Western Steamship Company.

Beaver (steamship)

BeaverSS ''BeaverSS Beaver
The first steamship to operate on the Pacific Ocean was the paddle steamer Beaver, launched in 1836 to service Hudson's Bay Company trading posts between Puget Sound Washington and Alaska.
Beaver was the first steamship to operate in the Pacific Northwest of North America.

P&O (company)

P&OP & OPeninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company
A partial solution to this problem was adopted by the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company (P&O), using an overland section between Alexandria and Suez, with connecting steamship routes along the Mediterranean and then through the Red Sea.
In 1835, Dublin shipowner Captain Richard Bourne joined the business, and the three men started a regular steamer service between London and Spain and Portugal – the Iberian Peninsula – using the name Peninsular Steam Navigation Company, with services to Vigo, Oporto, Lisbon and Cádiz.

SS Carnatic

SS ''CarnaticCarnaticCarnatic'' (1863)
Carnatic (1863), a P&O ship, had a compound engine - and achieved better efficiency than other ships of the time.
SS Carnatic was a British steamship built in 1862-63 by Samuda Brothers at Cubitt Town on the Isle of Dogs, London, for the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company.

New York Harbor

New YorkNew York HarbourNew York waterfront
The California left New York Harbor on 6 October 1848, rounded Cape Horn at the tip of South America, and arrived at San Francisco, California, after a four-month and 21-day journey.
Because of its location and depth, the Port grew rapidly with the introduction of steamships; and then with the completion in 1825 of the Erie Canal New York became the most important transshipping port between the American interior and Europe as well as coastwise destinations.

SS Agamemnon (1865)

AgamemnonSS Agamemnon
Holt was able to persuade the Board of Trade to allow these boiler pressures and, in partnership with his brother Phillip launched Agamemnon in 1865.
SS Agamemnon was one of the first successful long-distance merchant steamships.

Turbinia

marine transport and naval warfare
After the demonstration by British engineer Charles Parsons of his steam turbine-driven yacht, Turbinia, in 1897, the use of steam turbines for propulsion quickly spread.
Turbinia was the first steam turbine-powered steamship.

Packet boat

packet shippacketmail steamer
Brunel was given a chance to inspect John Laird's 213 ft (English) channel packet ship Rainbow—the largest iron-hulled ship then in service— in 1838, and was soon converted to iron-hulled technology.
Mail steamers were steamships which carried the mail across waterways, such as across an ocean or between islands, primarily during the 19th century and early 20th century, when the cost of sending a letter was declining to the point an ordinary person could afford the cost of sending a letter across great distances.

Compound engine

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By 1870 a number of inventions such as the screw propeller, the compound engine, and the triple-expansion engine made trans-oceanic shipping on a large scale economically viable.
Three stage or triple expansion reciprocating steam engines, with three cylinders of increasing bore in line, were particularly popular for steamship propulsion.

Steamboat

steamersteamerssteamboats
The steamship was preceded by smaller vessels designed for insular transportation, called steamboats.
Steamboats sometimes use the prefix designation SS, S.S. or S/S (for 'Screw Steamer') or PS (for 'Paddle Steamer'), however these designations are most often used for steamships.

SS British Queen

British Queen
She was the largest steamship for one year, until the British and American's British Queen went into service.

Windjammer

windjammerscargo-carrying
The last Victory ships had already been equipped with marine diesels, and diesel engines superseded both steamers and windjammers soon after World War Two.
Windjammers were mainly built from the 1870s to 1900, when steamships began to outpace them economically, due to their ability to keep a schedule regardless of the wind.

Clipper

clipper shipclipper shipstea clipper
Most notable of these cargoes was tea, typically carried in clippers.
Decline in the use of clippers started with the economic slump following the Panic of 1857 and continued with the gradual introduction of the steamship.

Steam turbine

steam turbinesgeared turbinesturbines
Most steamships today are powered by steam turbines.
In steamships, advantages of steam turbines over reciprocating engines are smaller size, lower maintenance, lighter weight, and lower vibration.

Seakeeping

seaworthyseaworthinesssea worthy
A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels.