Stearic acid

stearicoctadecanoic acidstearate(R)-2-hydroxystearate-Stearic AcidE570monostearateSAstearic diacidstearoyl
Stearic acid is a saturated fatty acid with an 18-carbon chain and has the IUPAC name octadecanoic acid.wikipedia
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Fatty acid

fatty acidsfree fatty acidsfree fatty acid
Stearic acid is a saturated fatty acid with an 18-carbon chain and has the IUPAC name octadecanoic acid.
An important saturated fatty acid is stearic acid (n = 16), which when neutralized with lye is the most common form of soap.

Stearin

stearinetristearinglyceryl tristearate
The triglyceride derived from three molecules of stearic acid is called stearin.
Stearin, or tristearin, or glyceryl tristearate is a triglyceride derived from three units of stearic acid.

Tallow

beef tallowbeef fattallow cups
It is a waxy solid and its chemical formula is C 17 H 35 CO 2 H. Its name comes from the Greek word στέαρ "stéar", which means tallow.

Triglyceride

triglyceridestriacylglyceroltriacylglycerols
The important exceptions are the foods cocoa butter and shea butter, where the stearic acid content (as a triglyceride) is 28–45%.
Cocoa butter is unusual in that it is composed of only a few triglycerides, derived from palmitic, oleic, and stearic acids in the 1-, 2-, and 3-positions of glycerol, respectively.

Cocoa butter

cacao buttercacao fatcocoa
The important exceptions are the foods cocoa butter and shea butter, where the stearic acid content (as a triglyceride) is 28–45%.

Glycol distearate

Esters of stearic acid with ethylene glycol, glycol stearate, and glycol distearate are used to produce a pearly effect in shampoos, soaps, and other cosmetic products.
Glycol distearate is the diester of stearic acid and ethylene glycol.

Shampoo

shampoosdandruff shampoomedicated shampoos
Stearic acid is mainly used in the production of detergents, soaps, and cosmetics such as shampoos and shaving cream products.
This effect is achieved by the addition of tiny flakes of suitable materials, e.g. glycol distearate, chemically derived from stearic acid, which may have either animal or vegetable origins.

Shea butter

KariteKaritéshea
The important exceptions are the foods cocoa butter and shea butter, where the stearic acid content (as a triglyceride) is 28–45%.
Shea butter extract is a complex fat that in addition to many nonsaponifiable components (substances that cannot be fully converted into soap by treatment with alkali) contains the following fatty acids: oleic acid (40–60%), stearic acid (20–50%), linoleic acid (3–11%), palmitic acid (2–9%), linolenic acid (

Calcium stearate

calcium soap
This reacts with the calcium in the plaster to form a thin layer of calcium stearate, which functions as a release agent.
Calcium stearate is produced by heating stearic acid and calcium oxide:

Glycol stearate

Esters of stearic acid with ethylene glycol, glycol stearate, and glycol distearate are used to produce a pearly effect in shampoos, soaps, and other cosmetic products.
It is the ester of stearic acid and ethylene glycol.

E number

E-numberEE numbers
The fatty acids (E number E570) are absorbed in the regular diet the same as the free fatty acids.

Lithium stearate

Lithium stearate is an important component of grease.
Lithium stearate is a white soft solid, prepared by the reaction of lithium hydroxide and stearic acid.

Stearyl alcohol

stearyloctadecanol
Stearic acid undergoes the typical reactions of saturated carboxylic acids, a notable one being reduction to stearyl alcohol, and esterification with a range of alcohols.
Stearyl alcohol is prepared from stearic acid or some fats by the process of catalytic hydrogenation.

Candle

candlescandlemakerCandle wax
Fatty acids are classic components of candle-making.
By the end of the 19th century candles were made from paraffin wax and stearic acid.

Magnesium stearate

E470bE572
It is a soap, consisting of salt containing two equivalents of stearate (the anion of stearic acid) and one magnesium cation (Mg 2+ ).

Sodium stearate

Sodium stearate is the sodium salt of stearic acid.

Oleic acid

oleicoleateoleoyl
An isotope labeling study in humans concluded that the fraction of dietary stearic acid that oxidatively desaturates to oleic acid is 2.4 times higher than the fraction of palmitic acid analogously converted to palmitoleic acid.
In effect, stearic acid is dehydrogenated to give the monounsaturated derivative oleic acid.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
It is a waxy solid and its chemical formula is C 17 H 35 CO 2 H. Its name comes from the Greek word στέαρ "stéar", which means tallow.

Ester

estersesterificationmonoester
Esters of stearic acid with ethylene glycol, glycol stearate, and glycol distearate are used to produce a pearly effect in shampoos, soaps, and other cosmetic products. The salts and esters of stearic acid are called stearates.

Palmitic acid

palmitatepalmitichexadecanoic acid
An isotope labeling study in humans concluded that the fraction of dietary stearic acid that oxidatively desaturates to oleic acid is 2.4 times higher than the fraction of palmitic acid analogously converted to palmitoleic acid. As its ester, stearic acid is one of the most common saturated fatty acids found in nature following palmitic acid.

Saponification

saponifiedsaponifysaponifies
Stearic acid is obtained from fats and oils by the saponification of the triglycerides using hot water (about 100 °C).

Fatty acid synthesis

fatty acid biosynthesisfatty acidbiosynthesis
In terms of its biosynthesis, stearic acid is produced from carbohydrates via the fatty acid synthesis machinery wherein acetyl-CoA contributes two-carbon building blocks.

Acetyl-CoA

acetyl CoAacetyl coenzyme Aacetyl-coenzyme A
In terms of its biosynthesis, stearic acid is produced from carbohydrates via the fatty acid synthesis machinery wherein acetyl-CoA contributes two-carbon building blocks.

Shaving cream

shaving foamshaving gelcream
Stearic acid is mainly used in the production of detergents, soaps, and cosmetics such as shampoos and shaving cream products.

Ethylene glycol

glycolmonoethylene glycolethanediol
Esters of stearic acid with ethylene glycol, glycol stearate, and glycol distearate are used to produce a pearly effect in shampoos, soaps, and other cosmetic products.