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Henry E. Steinway

Heinrich Engelhard SteinwegHenry Engelhard SteinwayHenry Steinway
Steinway & Sons, also known as Steinway, is an American piano company, founded in 1853 in Manhattan by German piano builder Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg (later known as Henry E. Steinway).
He was the founder of the piano company Steinway & Sons.

Bösendorfer

BosendorferLudwig BösendorferBösendorfer piano
Along with C. Bechstein, Bösendorfer and Blüthner, Steinway is frequently referred to as one of the "Big Four" piano manufacturers.
The Bösendorfer sound is usually described as darker or richer than the purer but less full-bodied sound of other pianos, such as Steinway & Sons, Casio or Yamaha.

Blüthner

Bluthner
Along with C. Bechstein, Bösendorfer and Blüthner, Steinway is frequently referred to as one of the "Big Four" piano manufacturers.
Along with C. Bechstein, Bösendorfer and Steinway & Sons, Blüthner is frequently referred to as one of the "Big Four" piano manufacturers.

William Steinway

Around 1870–80, William Steinway (born Wilhelm Steinweg, a son of Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg) established a professional community, the company town Steinway Village, in what is now the Astoria neighborhood of Queens in New York City. From 1864 to 1866, William Steinway, who is credited with establishing Steinway's success in marketing, oversaw the construction of Steinway Hall on East 14th Street in Manhattan, New York City.
William Steinway, also known as Wilhelm Steinway (born Wilhelm Steinweg; March 5, 1835 – November 30, 1896), son of Steinway & Sons founder Henry E. Steinway, was a businessman and civic leader who was influential in the development of Astoria, New York City.

Grotrian-Steinweg

GrotrianGrotrian Steinweg competitionGrotrian-Steinweg, Helfferich, Schulz, formerly Theodor Steinweg
Steinweg), later shortened to Grotrian-Steinweg.
Grotrian-Steinweg's history dates back to 1835 when the first Steinweg piano factory was built by Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg (later known as Henry Steinway after his emigration to the US where he founded Steinway & Sons).

Astoria, Queens

AstoriaAstoria, New YorkRavenswood
Around 1870–80, William Steinway (born Wilhelm Steinweg, a son of Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg) established a professional community, the company town Steinway Village, in what is now the Astoria neighborhood of Queens in New York City.
One such settler was Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg, patriarch of the Steinway family who founded the piano company Steinway & Sons in 1853, which today is a worldwide piano company.

Steinway Hall

Steinway Building Steinway Hall, LondonSteinway Hall in New York City
From 1864 to 1866, William Steinway, who is credited with establishing Steinway's success in marketing, oversaw the construction of Steinway Hall on East 14th Street in Manhattan, New York City.
Steinway Hall (German: Steinway-Haus) is the name of buildings housing concert halls, showrooms and sales departments for Steinway & Sons pianos.

Piano

grand pianopianistacoustic piano
Steinway & Sons, also known as Steinway, is an American piano company, founded in 1853 in Manhattan by German piano builder Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg (later known as Henry E. Steinway).
The sostenuto pedal (see below), invented in 1844 by Jean-Louis Boisselot and copied by the Steinway firm in 1874, allowed a wider range of effects.

Weber Piano Company

Weber[Albert] Weber Co.Albert Weber
The competition was principally between Steinway, Chickering, and Weber.
Steinway & Sons, arguably one of today's most recognized piano manufacturers, was founded by German immigrant Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg in 1853, only a few years after Albert Weber founded his company.

Royal warrant of appointment

Royal Warrantroyal warrantsHoflieferant
In 1890, Steinway received its first royal warrant, granted by Queen Victoria.

Henry Z. Steinway

Henry Ziegler Steinway
Until his death on September 18, 2008 at the age of 93, Henry Z. Steinway, the great-grandson of the Steinway founder, still worked for Steinway and put his signature on custom-made limited edition pianos.
Henry Ziegler Steinway (August 23, 1915 – September 18, 2008) was the last member of the Steinway family to be president of the piano company Steinway & Sons.

Chickering & Sons

Chickering and SonsChickeringChickering & Mackays
The competition was principally between Steinway, Chickering, and Weber.
Chickering was the largest piano manufacturer in the United States in the middle of the 19th century, but was surpassed in the 1860s by Steinway.

Welte-Mignon

Welte Philharmonic OrganWelteWelte Mignon
Several systems such as the Welte-Mignon, Duo-Art, and Ampico were incorporated.
By 1906, the Mignon was also exported to the United States, installed to pianos by the firms Feurich and Steinway & Sons.

Roger Williams (pianist)

Roger Williams
In 2003, Steinway celebrated its 150th anniversary at Carnegie Hall with a three-day concert series with performances by Peter Cincotti, Art Garfunkel, Herbie Hancock, Ben Heppner, Ahmad Jamal, Ramsey Lewis, Randy Newman, Roger Williams, Nancy Wilson, and Eroica Trio, among others.
He was a Navy boxing champion, played for nine U.S. Presidential administrations, and had a gold Steinway & Sons grand piano model named in his honor.

Queens

Queens, New YorkQueens CountyQueens, NY
The factory in the Queens borough of New York City supplies the Americas and the factory in Hamburg supplies the rest of the world.
Several large companies have their headquarters in Queens, including watchmaker Bulova, based in East Elmhurst; internationally renowned piano manufacturer Steinway & Sons in Astoria; Glacéau, the makers of Vitamin Water, headquartered in Whitestone; and JetBlue Airways, an airline based in Long Island City.

Initial Interest Confusion

The case set a precedent and established the concept of Initial Interest Confusion, in which consumers might be initially attracted to a similarly named but lesser-known brand because of the stronger brand's good reputation.
Consequently, Steinway & Sons filled a trademark infringement suite against Grotrian.

Steinway Musical Instruments

Steinway Musical Instruments, Inc.
In 1995, Steinway Musical Properties was acquired by Selmer Industries to form the musical conglomerate Steinway Musical Instruments.
It was formed in a 1995 merger between the Selmer Industries and Steinway Musical Properties, the parent company of Steinway & Sons piano manufacturers.

Steinway D-274

Steinway concert grand pianoD-274Model D
In 2007, they obtained their 200th Steinway piano, a model D-274 manufactured at Steinway's factory in Hamburg, Germany.
D-274 (or D) is the model name of a concert grand piano, the flagship of the Steinway & Sons piano company, first built in 1884.

Dakota Jackson

Designers and artists such as Karl Lagerfeld, Dakota Jackson, Walter Dorwin Teague, Arthur Blackmore, Joseph Burr Tiffany, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, George Schastey, and the Herter Brothers have created original designs for Steinway pianos.
Dakota Jackson, (born August 24, 1949) is an American furniture designer known for his eponymous furniture brand, Dakota Jackson, Inc., his early avant-garde works involving moving parts or hidden compartments, and his collaborations with the Steinway & Sons piano company.

East Room

East Room of the White House
The piano is normally placed in the largest room of the White House, the East Room.
That same year, the Steinway & Sons piano company donated an ornate gilded grand piano to the White House.

C.F. Theodore Steinway

C.F. Theodor SteinwegC. F. Theodor SteinwegChristian Friedrich Theodor Steinweg
The eldest son, C. F. Theodor Steinweg, remained in Germany, and continued making the Steinweg brand of pianos, partnering with Friedrich Grotrian, a piano dealer, from 1856 to 1865.
In 1866, C.F. Theodore Steinway began a cooperative venture with the Mangeot brothers in Nancy, France, who for several years in the late 1860s imported harps and soundboards from Steinway & Sons in New York City, which they installed in their own piano cabinets and sold under the brand name "Mangeot-Steinway", mostly in France and England.

Steinway Vertegrand

K-132Model K52 and K132Mrs Mills" Steinway Vertegrand
The Model K or "Vertegrand" is an upright piano introduced in 1903 by Steinway & Sons.

Fender Musical Instruments Corporation

FenderFender GuitarsFender bass
At that time CBS owned many enterprises in the entertainment industry, including electric guitar and amplifier maker Fender, drum maker Rogers, electro-mechanical piano maker Rhodes, and the baseball team New York Yankees.
CBS entered the musical instruments field by acquiring the Fender companies (Fender Sales, Inc., Fender Electric Instrument Company, Inc., Fender Acoustic Instrument Company, Inc., Fender-Rhodes, Inc., Terrafen, Inc., Clef-Tronix, Inc., Randall Publishing Co., Inc., and V.C. Squier Company), as well as Electro-Music Inc. (Leslie speakers), Rogers drums, Steinway pianos, Gemeinhardt flutes, Lyon & Healy harps, Rodgers (institutional) organs, and Gulbransen home organs.

Conn-Selmer

SelmerThe Selmer CompanyConn
In 1995, Steinway Musical Properties was acquired by Selmer Industries to form the musical conglomerate Steinway Musical Instruments.
With the backing of Kirkland Messina, Selmer Industries acquired the Steinway Musical Properties company, the parent company of piano manufacturer Steinway & Sons, in 1995 and changed their own name to Steinway Musical Instruments.

Rodgers Instruments

RodgersRodgers Organ CompanyRodgers Organs
This new conglomerate was evidently not as successful as CBS had expected, and Steinway was sold in 1985, along with classical and church organ maker Rodgers and flute and piccolo maker Gemeinhardt, to a group of Boston-area investors.
Originally controlled by officers of Tektronix and the founding engineers, in September 1977, Rodgers became part of CBS Musical Instruments along with Steinway & Sons pianos, Fender guitars, Rhodes electric pianos, Gemeinhardt flutes, and a number of other instrument brand names.