Stent

stentsstent graftstentingendovascular stentcoronary artery stentingcovered stentIntravascular stentStent graftsstent-graftsurgical template
In medicine, a stent is a metal or plastic tube inserted into the lumen of an anatomic vessel or duct to keep the passageway open, and stenting is the placement of a stent.wikipedia
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Coronary stent

coronary artery stentheart stentstent
There is a wide variety of stents used for different purposes, from expandable coronary, vascular and biliary stents, to simple plastic stents used to allow the flow of urine between kidney and bladder.
A coronary stent is a tube-shaped device placed in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, to keep the arteries open in the treatment of coronary heart disease.

Bare-metal stent

Bare-metal stent is a stent without a coating or covering (as used in covered stents drug-eluting stents).

Angioplasty

balloon angioplastyangioplastiespercutaneous transluminal angioplasty
A stent may be inserted at the time of ballooning to ensure the vessel remains open, and the balloon is then deflated and withdrawn.

Genous

dual-therapy stentGenous Bio-engineered R stent
Genous is an endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) capture technology manufactured by OrbusNeich that promotes the accelerated natural healing of the vessel wall after stent implantation.

Endovascular aneurysm repair

Thoracic endovascular aortic repairabdominal aortic aneurysmsendoleak
The procedure involves the placement of an expandable stent graft within the aorta to treat aortic disease without operating directly on the aorta.

Prostatic stent

urethral stenturethral stents
A prostatic stent is a stent used to keep open the male urethra and allow the passing of urine in cases of prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

Bile duct

biliarybile ductsbiliary duct
There is a wide variety of stents used for different purposes, from expandable coronary, vascular and biliary stents, to simple plastic stents used to allow the flow of urine between kidney and bladder.
Biliary drainage is performed with a tube or catheter (called a biliary drain, biliary stent or biliary catheter) by a surgeon or, commonly, an interventional radiologist.

Self-expandable metallic stent

bowel stentself expandable metallic stentself-expanding metal stents
A self-expandable metallic stent (or SEMS) is a metallic tube, or stent, used in order to hold open a structure in the gastrointestinal tract in order to allow the passage of food, chyme, stool, or other secretions required for digestion.

Esophageal stent

stent
An esophageal stent is a stent (tube) placed in the esophagus to keep a blocked area open so the patient can swallow soft food and liquids.

Atherosclerosis

atheroscleroticatherogenesisatherosclerotic plaques
"Stent" is also used as a verb to describe the placement of such a device, particularly when a disease such as atherosclerosis has pathologically narrowed a structure such as an artery.
Vascular bypass surgery can re-establish flow around the diseased segment of artery, and angioplasty with or without stenting can reopen narrowed arteries and improve bloodflow.

Vascular bypass

vascular graftArtificial vascular graftsbypass surgery
If a patient is deemed to be too high-risk to undergo a bypass, he or she may be a candidate for angioplasty or stenting of the relevant vessel.

Ulrich Sigwart

The first (self-expanding) "stents" used in medical practice in 1986 by Ulrich Sigwart in Lausanne were initially called "Wallstents" after its inventor, Hans Wallstén.
Ulrich Sigwart (born March 9, 1941) is a cardiologist known for his pioneering role in the conception and clinical use of vascular stents.

Nickel titanium

nitinolNiTiNi-Ti
Another significant application of nitinol in medicine is in stents: a collapsed stent can be inserted into an artery or vein, where body temperature warms the stent and the stent returns to its original expanded shape following removal of a constraining sheath; the stent then helps support the artery or vein to improve blood flow. It is also used as a replacement for sutures - nitinol wire can be woven through two structures then allowed to transform into its preformed shape, which should hold the structures in place.

Bioresorbable stent

bioresorbable stentsBio-absorbable stentsbioabsorbable drug-eluting sinus stent
Bioresorbable stent
In medicine, a stent is any device which is inserted into a blood vessel or other internal duct in order to expand the vessel to prevent or alleviate a blockage.

Esophageal cancer

throat canceroesophageal canceresophageal
Disease that is widespread, metastatic or recurrent is managed palliatively: in this case, chemotherapy may be used to lengthen survival, while treatments such as radiotherapy or stenting may be used to relieve symptoms and make it easier to swallow.

Julio Palmaz

Dr. Julio Palmaz
Julio Palmaz et al. created a balloon-expandable stent that is currently used.
He is known for inventing the balloon-expandable stent, for which he received a patent filed in 1985.

Restenosis

coronary restenosisre-stenosisrestenotic
It was used as a scaffold to prevent the vessel from closing and to avoid restenosis in coronary surgery—a condition where scar tissue grows within the stent and interferes with vascular flow.
A stent is a mesh, tube-like structure often used in conjunction with angioplasty to permanently hold open an artery, allowing for unrestricted blood flow, or to support a weakness in the artery wall called an aneurysm.

Jan F. Esser

Johannes EsserJ.F. Esser
Others attribute the noun "stent" to Jan F. Esser, a Dutch plastic surgeon who in 1916 used the word to describe a dental impression compound invented in 1856 by the English dentist Charles Stent (1807–1885), whom Esser employed to craft a form for facial reconstruction.
He is thought to have coined the term "stent" in 1917 to describe his use of a dental impression compound invented in 1856 by the English dentist Charles Stent (1807–1885) to create a form for facial reconstruction.

Ascending cholangitis

cholangitisacute cholangitisbiliary sepsis
Narrowed areas may be bridged by a stent, a hollow tube that keeps the duct open.

Charles Stent

Charles Thomas Stent
Others attribute the noun "stent" to Jan F. Esser, a Dutch plastic surgeon who in 1916 used the word to describe a dental impression compound invented in 1856 by the English dentist Charles Stent (1807–1885), whom Esser employed to craft a form for facial reconstruction. As Ariel Roguin describes in his paper "Stent: The Man and Word Behind the Coronary Metal Prosthesis", the current acceptable origin of the word stent is that it derives from the name of a dentist, Charles Thomas Stent, notable for his advances in the field of denture-making.
The medical device called a stent derives its name from him.

Bronchoscopy

bronchoscopebronchoscopicbronchoscopies
Bronchoscopy
Stent insertion to palliate extrinsic compression of the tracheobronchial lumen from either malignant or benign disease processes

Medicine

medicalmedical sciencemedicinal
In medicine, a stent is a metal or plastic tube inserted into the lumen of an anatomic vessel or duct to keep the passageway open, and stenting is the placement of a stent.

Lumen (anatomy)

lumenluminallumina
In medicine, a stent is a metal or plastic tube inserted into the lumen of an anatomic vessel or duct to keep the passageway open, and stenting is the placement of a stent.

Urine

urinaryhuman urinepiss
There is a wide variety of stents used for different purposes, from expandable coronary, vascular and biliary stents, to simple plastic stents used to allow the flow of urine between kidney and bladder.

Kidney

kidneysrenalrenal circulation
There is a wide variety of stents used for different purposes, from expandable coronary, vascular and biliary stents, to simple plastic stents used to allow the flow of urine between kidney and bladder.