Stephen Hopkins (politician)

Stephen HopkinsGovernor Stephen HopkinsStephen
Stephen Hopkins (March 7, 1707 – July 13, 1785) was a governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, a Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.wikipedia
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Thomas Hopkins (settler)

Thomas Hopkins
His great grandfather Thomas Hopkins was an [[List of early settlers of Rhode Island#Signers of Providence agreement for a government, 1640|original settler]] of Providence Plantation, sailing from England in 1635 with his cousin Benedict Arnold who became the first governor of the Rhode Island colony under the Royal Charter of 1663. His grandmother Abigail Whipple Hopkins was a daughter of Providence settler John Whipple, sister of wealthy Providence merchant Joseph Whipple, and aunt to Deputy Governor Joseph Whipple, Jr. His great grandfather was Thomas Hopkins, one of the earliest settlers of Providence Plantations.
Thomas Hopkins (1616–1684) was an early settler of Providence Plantations and the great grandfather of Stephen Hopkins who was many times colonial governor of Rhode Island and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

List of Chief Justices of the Rhode Island Supreme Court

Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme CourtChief Justicefirst Chief Justice
Stephen Hopkins (March 7, 1707 – July 13, 1785) was a governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, a Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Scituate, Rhode Island

ScituateNorth ScituateNorth Scituate, Rhode Island
He began his public service at age 23 as a justice of the peace in the newly established town of Scituate, Rhode Island.
Stephen Hopkins later became a governor of Rhode Island and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Rhode Island Supreme Court

Supreme Court of Rhode IslandChief Justice of Rhode IslandSupreme Court
Stephen Hopkins (March 7, 1707 – July 13, 1785) was a governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, a Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Stephen Hopkins, later signatory of the Declaration of Independence, served as the third Chief Justice from 1747 to 1755.

Samuel Ward (American statesman)

Samuel WardWardSamuel Ward Sr.
His bitter political rival Samuel Ward championed hard currency, whereas Hopkins advocated the use of paper money.
His primary rival over the money issue was Providence politician Stephen Hopkins, and the two men became bitter rivals—and the two also alternated as governors of the Colony for several terms.

List of early settlers of Rhode Island

nine founding settlers12 original proprietors13 original proprietors
His great grandfather Thomas Hopkins was an [[List of early settlers of Rhode Island#Signers of Providence agreement for a government, 1640|original settler]] of Providence Plantation, sailing from England in 1635 with his cousin Benedict Arnold who became the first governor of the Rhode Island colony under the Royal Charter of 1663.

Brown University

BrownCollege in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence PlantationsBrown Association for Cooperative Housing
He was a strong backer of the College of the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (later named Brown University) and became the institution's first chancellor.
Governor Stephen Hopkins was chosen chancellor, former and future governor Samuel Ward was vice chancellor, John Tillinghast treasurer, and Thomas Eyres secretary.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
Stephen Hopkins (March 7, 1707 – July 13, 1785) was a governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, a Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

The Rights of Colonies Examined

Hopkins had become well known in the thirteen colonies ten years earlier when he published a pamphlet entitled The Rights of Colonies Examined which was critical of British Parliament and its taxation policies.
The Rights of Colonies Examined was an influential essay published in 1764 by Founding Father Stephen Hopkins.

John Greenwood (artist)

John Greenwood
While active in civic affairs, he also was part owner of an iron foundry and was a successful merchant who was portrayed in John Greenwood's 1750s satirical painting Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam.
One of Greenwood's best known works is Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam (1755), a drunken scene featuring various prominent Rhode Island merchants, including Declaration of Independence signatory Stephen Hopkins, Governor Joseph Wanton, Admiral Esek Hopkins, and Governor Nicholas Cooke.

First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
In 1774, he was given an additional important responsibility as one of Rhode Island's two delegates to the First Continental Congress—his former rival Samuel Ward being the other.

Josias Lyndon

Ultimately, both agreed to not run for office in 1768, and Josias Lyndon was elected governor of the colony as a compromise candidate.
At the time of Lyndon's election to governor in 1768, there was a lot of bitter acrimony between one camp led by Samuel Ward and the other camp led by Stephen Hopkins, both of whom had already served multiple terms as governor.

Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations

Rhode IslandColony of Rhode IslandRhode Island Colony
Stephen Hopkins (March 7, 1707 – July 13, 1785) was a governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, a Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Leading figures in the colony were involved in the 1776 launch of the American Revolutionary War which delivered American independence from the British Empire, such as former royal governors Stephen Hopkins and Samuel Ward, as well as John Brown, Nicholas Brown, William Ellery, the Reverend James Manning, and the Reverend Ezra Stiles, each of whom had played an influential role in founding Brown University in Providence in 1764 as a sanctuary for religious and intellectual freedom.

Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam

While active in civic affairs, he also was part owner of an iron foundry and was a successful merchant who was portrayed in John Greenwood's 1750s satirical painting Sea Captains Carousing in Surinam.
The subjects in the painting include Nicholas Cooke, sitting at the table smoking a pipe, speaking to Esek Hopkins; Joseph Wanton who has passed out in a chair, and Stephen Hopkins is pouring a drink (perhaps rum punch) from a porcelain bowl onto Wanton's head; and another unidentified figure is vomiting into his pocket.

North Burial Ground

North Burying Groundpublic burial ground
He died in Providence in 1785 at the age of 78, and is buried in the North Burial Ground there.

John Brown (Rhode Island)

John BrownJohnBrown family
One of Hopkins' enterprises later in life was as a manufacturer, and he became a partner with brothers Moses, Nicholas, Joseph, and John Brown in establishing the Hope Furnace.
He was also a partner (along with his brother Moses Brown and Rhode Island Governor Stephen Hopkins) in the Hope Furnace (located in Hope Village on the border of towns of Scituate and Coventry, RI) which made cannons during the American Revolution and through the War of 1812.

John Whipple (settler)

John WhippleJohn
His grandmother Abigail Whipple Hopkins was a daughter of Providence settler John Whipple, sister of wealthy Providence merchant Joseph Whipple, and aunt to Deputy Governor Joseph Whipple, Jr. His great grandfather was Thomas Hopkins, one of the earliest settlers of Providence Plantations.
Another great grandson, Stephen Hopkins was a governor of the colony, Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court, and signer of the Declaration of Independence.

William Greene (colonial governor)

William GreeneWilliam Greene Sr.William Greene, Sr.
In 1755, Hopkins was elected to his first term as governor, defeating his predecessor William Greene by a small margin.
The leaders of the two divisions were both future governors, Samuel Ward and Stephen Hopkins, with Greene siding with the Ward camp.

Providence Athenaeum

Providence AthenæumProvidence Library Company
Hopkins helped to found a subscription library, the Providence Library Company, in 1753, and was a member of the Philosophical Society of Newport.
Stephen Hopkins, signatory of the Declaration of Independence, was a leading member of the early organization.

Hopkinton, Rhode Island

HopkintonHopkinton, RIHope Valley (Hopkinton), RI
The town of Hopkinton, Rhode Island, was later named after him.
Hopkinton is named after Stephen Hopkins, a signer of the Declaration of Independence who was Governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations when the town was partitioned from Westerly and incorporated in 1757.

Esek Hopkins

1777-8 caseCommodore Esek HopkinsHopkins
Hopkins used his influence to secure the position of commander in chief of the new navy for his brother Esek Hopkins, an appointment that proved to be unfortunate.
In the interval between voyages, moreover, he was engaged in Rhode Island politics, served as a deputy to the Rhode Island General Assembly, and rendered efficient support to his brother Stephen, who became governor in 1755.

Joseph Whipple

Col. Joseph Whipple Sr.
His grandmother Abigail Whipple Hopkins was a daughter of Providence settler John Whipple, sister of wealthy Providence merchant Joseph Whipple, and aunt to Deputy Governor Joseph Whipple, Jr. His great grandfather was Thomas Hopkins, one of the earliest settlers of Providence Plantations.
Whipple's sister, Abigail, with her husband William Hopkins, were grandparents of Rhode Island Governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence, Stephen Hopkins, and Whipple's granddaughter, Mary Gibbs, married John Hopkins, a son of Stephen.

Declaration of Independence (Trumbull)

Declaration of IndependenceDeclaration of Independence'' (Trumbull)famous painting
The gathering of the founding fathers was depicted in John Trumbull's Declaration of Independence where Hopkins is easily distinguishable as the gentleman standing in the back wearing a hat.

Founding Fathers of the United States

Founding FathersFounding FatherFounding Father of the United States
The gathering of the founding fathers was depicted in John Trumbull's Declaration of Independence where Hopkins is easily distinguishable as the gentleman standing in the back wearing a hat.
While serving in the Rhode Island Assembly, Stephen Hopkins introduced one of the earliest anti-slavery laws in the colonies, and John Jay would try unsuccessfully to abolish slavery as early as 1777 in the State of New York.

Gaspee Affair

Gaspée AffairGaspeeGaspee'' Affair
In 1770, Hopkins once again became Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court and, during this tenure, became a principal player in the colony's handling of the 1772 Gaspee Affair, when a group of irate Rhode Island citizens boarded a British revenue vessel and burned it to the waterline.
In the letter, Sessions includes the opinion of Chief Justice Stephen Hopkins, who argues that "no commander of any vessel has any right to use any authority in the Body of the Colony without previously applying to the Governor and showing his warrant for so doing."