Steve McQueen

Solar ProductionsMcQueenSolarStevethe Hollywood actor Steve McQueen
Terrence Stephen McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American actor.wikipedia
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Bullitt

the film
His other popular films include The Cincinnati Kid, Love With the Proper Stranger, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt, The Getaway, and Papillon, as well as the all-star ensemble films The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, and The Towering Inferno. He followed his Oscar nomination with 1968's Bullitt, one of his best-known films, which co-starred Jacqueline Bisset, Robert Vaughn and Don Gordon.
The picture stars Steve McQueen, Robert Vaughn, and Jacqueline Bisset.

The Great Escape (film)

The Great EscapefilmGreat Escape
His other popular films include The Cincinnati Kid, Love With the Proper Stranger, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt, The Getaway, and Papillon, as well as the all-star ensemble films The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, and The Towering Inferno.
The Great Escape is a 1963 American epic war film starring Steve McQueen, James Garner and Richard Attenborough, and featuring James Donald, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasence, James Coburn, and Hannes Messemer.

The Magnificent Seven

Magnificent Seven1960 film1960 western film of the same name
His other popular films include The Cincinnati Kid, Love With the Proper Stranger, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt, The Getaway, and Papillon, as well as the all-star ensemble films The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, and The Towering Inferno. After Never So Few, the film's director John Sturges cast McQueen in his next movie, promising to "give him the camera.” The Magnificent Seven (1960), in which he played Vin Tanner and co-starred with Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach, Robert Vaughn, Charles Bronson and James Coburn, became McQueen's first major hit and led to his withdrawal from Wanted: Dead or Alive. McQueen's focused portrayal of the taciturn second lead catapulted his career. His added touches in many of the shots, such as shaking a shotgun round before loading it, repeatedly checking his gun while in the background of a shot, and wiping his hat rim, annoyed costar Brynner, who protested that McQueen was trying to steal scenes. (In his autobiography, Eli Wallach reports struggling to conceal his amusement while watching the filming of the funeral-procession scene where Brynner's and McQueen's characters first meet: Brynner was furious at McQueen's shotgun-round-shake, which effectively diverted the viewer's attention to McQueen.) Brynner refused to draw his gun in the same scene with McQueen, not wanting his character outdrawn.
The Magnificent Seven is a 1960 American Western film directed by John Sturges and starring Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter, James Coburn and Horst Buchholz.

The Thomas Crown Affair (1968 film)

The Thomas Crown AffairThomas Crown Affair1968
His other popular films include The Cincinnati Kid, Love With the Proper Stranger, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt, The Getaway, and Papillon, as well as the all-star ensemble films The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, and The Towering Inferno.
The Thomas Crown Affair is a 1968 American heist film directed and produced by Norman Jewison and starring Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway.

The Getaway (1972 film)

The Getaway1972film of the same name
His other popular films include The Cincinnati Kid, Love With the Proper Stranger, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt, The Getaway, and Papillon, as well as the all-star ensemble films The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, and The Towering Inferno.
The film stars Steve McQueen, Ali MacGraw, Ben Johnson, Al Lettieri, and Sally Struthers.

The Sand Pebbles (film)

The Sand PebblesThe Sand Pebbles'' (film)And We Were Lovers
McQueen received an Academy Award nomination for his role in The Sand Pebbles.
The film features Steve McQueen, Richard Attenborough, Richard Crenna, Candice Bergen, Mako, Simon Oakland, Larry Gates, and Marayat Andriane.

Papillon (1973 film)

Papillon1973 filmfilm of the same name
His other popular films include The Cincinnati Kid, Love With the Proper Stranger, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt, The Getaway, and Papillon, as well as the all-star ensemble films The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, and The Towering Inferno.
The film stars Steve McQueen as Charrière ("Papillon") and Dustin Hoffman as Louis Dega.

The Cincinnati Kid

filmfilmed
His other popular films include The Cincinnati Kid, Love With the Proper Stranger, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt, The Getaway, and Papillon, as well as the all-star ensemble films The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, and The Towering Inferno.
The film was directed by Norman Jewison and stars Steve McQueen in the title role and Edward G. Robinson as Howard.

Beech Grove, Indiana

Beech GroveBeech Grove, INIndiana (Beech Grove)
Terence Steven McQueen was born on March 24, 1930 at St. Francis Hospital in Beech Grove, Indiana, a suburb of Indianapolis.
Two famous actors have listed Beech Grove as their birthplace—Clifton Webb (November 19, 1889–1966) and Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930–1980).

Wanted Dead or Alive (TV series)

Wanted: Dead or AliveWanted Dead or AliveDead or Alive
McQueen then filmed the pilot episode, which became the series titled Wanted: Dead or Alive, which aired on CBS in September 1958.
Wanted Dead or Alive is an American Western television series starring Steve McQueen as the bounty hunter Josh Randall.

The Blob

blob19581958 film
McQueen was subsequently hired for the films Never Love a Stranger, The Blob (his first leading role) which depicts a flesh eating amoeba-like space creature, and The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery.
The film stars Steve McQueen (in his starring feature film debut, as Steven McQueen) and Aneta Corsaut and co-stars Earl Rowe and Olin Howland.

Gia Scala

During this time, he also studied acting with Stella Adler in whose class he met Gia Scala.
During this time, Scala studied acting with Stella Adler, where she met Steve McQueen.

Robert Culp

Robert M. Culp
McQueen appeared as Randall in the episode, cast opposite series lead and old New York motorcycle racing buddy Robert Culp.
Trackdown then had a CBS spin-off of its own, Wanted: Dead or Alive, with Steve McQueen as bounty hunter Josh Randall.

James Coburn

After Never So Few, the film's director John Sturges cast McQueen in his next movie, promising to "give him the camera.” The Magnificent Seven (1960), in which he played Vin Tanner and co-starred with Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach, Robert Vaughn, Charles Bronson and James Coburn, became McQueen's first major hit and led to his withdrawal from Wanted: Dead or Alive. McQueen's focused portrayal of the taciturn second lead catapulted his career. His added touches in many of the shots, such as shaking a shotgun round before loading it, repeatedly checking his gun while in the background of a shot, and wiping his hat rim, annoyed costar Brynner, who protested that McQueen was trying to steal scenes. (In his autobiography, Eli Wallach reports struggling to conceal his amusement while watching the filming of the funeral-procession scene where Brynner's and McQueen's characters first meet: Brynner was furious at McQueen's shotgun-round-shake, which effectively diverted the viewer's attention to McQueen.) Brynner refused to draw his gun in the same scene with McQueen, not wanting his character outdrawn.
During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Coburn cultivated an image synonymous with "cool" and, along with such contemporaries as Lee Marvin, Steve McQueen, and Charles Bronson, became one of the prominent "tough-guy" actors of his day.

Slater, Missouri

SlaterSlater, MO
Unable to cope with caring for a small child, she left him with her parents (Victor and Lillian) in Slater, Missouri in 1933.

Never So Few

filmfilmed in 1959
At 29, McQueen got a significant break when Frank Sinatra removed Sammy Davis, Jr., from the film Never So Few after Davis supposedly made some mildly negative remarks about Sinatra in a radio interview, and Davis' role went to McQueen.
Never So Few is a 1959 CinemaScope Metrocolor war film, directed by John Sturges and starring Frank Sinatra, Gina Lollobrigida, Peter Lawford, Steve McQueen, Richard Johnson, Paul Henreid, Brian Donlevy, Dean Jones, Charles Bronson, and Philip Ahn, and featuring uncredited roles by renowned Asian actors Mako, George Takei and James Hong.

Sanford Meisner

Sandy MeisnerMeisner techniqueMeisner
In 1952, with financial assistance provided by the G.I. Bill, McQueen began studying acting in New York at Sanford Meisner's Neighborhood Playhouse and at HB Studio under Uta Hagen.
Notable students and alumni of The Neighborhood Playhouse under Sanford Meisner's instruction include: Dylan McDermott, James Caan, Steve McQueen, Robert Duvall, Gregory Peck, Diane Keaton, Jeff Goldblum, Tony Randall, Sydney Pollack, David Mamet, Connie Britton, Brian Geraghty, Leslie Moonves, Sherie Rene Scott, Chris Noth, Tucker Smallwood, Mary Steenburgen, Betsy von Furstenberg, Allison Janney, Jennifer Grey, Ashlie Atkinson, Christopher Meloni, Alex Cole Taylor, and many more.

Nevada Smith

1966eponymous film
He later appeared as the titular Nevada Smith, a character from Harold Robbins' novel, The Carpetbaggers, portrayed by Alan Ladd two years earlier in a movie version of that novel.
Nevada Smith is a 1966 American Western film directed by Henry Hathaway and starring Steve McQueen.

Hillard Elkins

Hilly Elkins
When McQueen appeared in a two-part television Westinghouse Studio One presentation entitled The Defenders, Hollywood manager Hilly Elkins (who managed McQueen's first wife, Neile) took note of him and decided that B-movies would be a good place for the young actor to make his mark.
After serving in the Korean War by making training films in Manhattan, he returned to agency work, but in 1953 left to open his own management company, where he represented James Coburn, Robert Culp, Steve McQueen, Mel Brooks, Herbert Ross, Charles Strouse, and Lee Adams.

Bud Ekins

Insurance concerns prevented McQueen from performing the film's notable motorcycle leap, which was done by his friend and fellow cycle enthusiast Bud Ekins, who resembled McQueen from a distance.
Ekins, acting as stunt double for Steve McQueen while filming The Great Escape, was the rider who performed what is considered to be one of the most famous motorcycle stunts ever performed in a movie.

The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery

McQueen was subsequently hired for the films Never Love a Stranger, The Blob (his first leading role) which depicts a flesh eating amoeba-like space creature, and The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery.
The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery (also called The St. Louis Bank Robbery, the film title in the opening credits) is a 1959 heist film, directed by Charles Guggenheim and starring Steve McQueen as a college dropout hired to be the getaway driver in a bank robbery.

Don Gordon (actor)

Don GordonDonald Gordon
He followed his Oscar nomination with 1968's Bullitt, one of his best-known films, which co-starred Jacqueline Bisset, Robert Vaughn and Don Gordon.
His most notable film roles were those in which he appeared alongside his friend Steve McQueen: Bullitt (1968), Papillon (1973) and The Towering Inferno (1974).

Never Love a Stranger

McQueen was subsequently hired for the films Never Love a Stranger, The Blob (his first leading role) which depicts a flesh eating amoeba-like space creature, and The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery.
The film was shot in black and white starring John Drew Barrymore and Robert Bray, and featuring a young Steve McQueen.

Junior Bonner

In 1971, McQueen starred in the poorly received auto-racing drama Le Mans, followed by Junior Bonner in 1972, a story of an aging rodeo rider.
Junior Bonner is a 1972 film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring Steve McQueen, Joe Don Baker, Robert Preston and Ida Lupino.

Le Mans (film)

Le MansLe Mans'' (film)
In 1971, McQueen starred in the poorly received auto-racing drama Le Mans, followed by Junior Bonner in 1972, a story of an aging rodeo rider.
Le Mans is a 1971 film depicting a fictional 24 Hours of Le Mans auto race starring Steve McQueen and directed by Lee H. Katzin.