Steve Wozniak

WozniakStephen WozniakWoz WayWozniak, SteveStephen G. WozniakStephen “Woz” WozniakSteve "Woz" WozniakSteven WozniakWoz
Stephen Gary Wozniak (born August 11, 1950), known as simply Woz, is an American electronics engineer, programmer, philanthropist, and technology entrepreneur.wikipedia
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Steve Jobs

JobsSteven Jobsdied
Through their work at Apple in the 1970s and 1980s, he and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs are widely recognized as two prominent pioneers of the personal computer revolution.
Jobs is widely recognized as a pioneer of the personal computer revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, along with Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak.

Apple Inc.

AppleApple ComputerApple Inc
In 1976 he co-founded Apple Inc., which later became the world's largest information technology company by revenue and largest company in the world by market capitalization. On April 1, 1976, Jobs and Wozniak formed Apple Computer Company (now called Apple Inc.) along with administrative supervisor Ronald Wayne, whose participation in the new venture was short-lived.
Apple was founded by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ronald Wayne in April 1976 to develop and sell Wozniak's Apple I personal computer, though Wayne sold his share back within 12 days.

Apple II

Apple 2AppleApple II Plus
He primarily designed the Apple II in 1977, known as one of the first highly successful mass-produced microcomputers, while Jobs oversaw the development of its foam-molded plastic case and early Apple employee Rod Holt developed the switching power supply.
The Apple II (stylized as apple ][) is an 8-bit home computer and one of the world's first highly successful mass-produced microcomputer products, designed primarily by Steve Wozniak (Steve Jobs oversaw the development of the Apple II's foam-molded plastic case and Rod Holt developed the switching power supply).

Apple I

Apple 1Apple I ComputerApple computer
In 1975, Wozniak started developing the Apple I into the computer that launched Apple when he and Jobs first began marketing it the following year.
It was designed and hand-built by Steve Wozniak.

CL 9

CL 9 CORE
After permanently leaving Apple in 1985, Wozniak founded CL 9 and created the first programmable universal remote, released in 1987.
CL 9 was a universal remote company started by Steve Wozniak, Apple Inc. co-founder and the inventor of the Apple I and Apple II personal computers.

Phreaking

phreakphreakerphone phreak
In the early 1970s, Wozniak's blue box design earned him the nickname "Berkeley Blue" in the phreaking community.
To ease the creation of these tones, electronic tone generators known as blue boxes became a staple of the phreaker community, a group of people that included future Apple Inc. cofounders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak.

Universal remote

universal remote controluniversal remote controlsuniversal television remote
After permanently leaving Apple in 1985, Wozniak founded CL 9 and created the first programmable universal remote, released in 1987.
It was called the "CORE" and was created by CL 9, a startup founded by Steve Wozniak, the inventor of the Apple I and Apple II computers.

Macintosh

Apple MacintoshMacMacs
With computer scientist Jef Raskin, Wozniak had major influence over the initial development of the original Apple Macintosh concepts from 1979 to 1981, when Jobs took over the project following Wozniak's brief departure from the company due to a traumatic airplane accident.
In a 2013 interview, Steve Wozniak insinuated that he had been leading the initial design and development phase of the Macintosh project until 1981 when he experienced a traumatic airplane crash and temporarily left the company, at which point Jobs took over.

Homestead High School (Cupertino, California)

Homestead High SchoolHomestead H.S.Homestead HS
He graduated from Homestead High School in 1968, in Cupertino, California.
During this period, the electronics teacher, John McCollum, created a hands-on classroom in which students like Stephen Wozniak learned while designing, building, repairing, and understanding a range of equipment.

Jef Raskin

CogneticsJeff RaskinSwyftCard
With computer scientist Jef Raskin, Wozniak had major influence over the initial development of the original Apple Macintosh concepts from 1979 to 1981, when Jobs took over the project following Wozniak's brief departure from the company due to a traumatic airplane accident.
Raskin first met Apple Computer co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in their garage workshop following the debut of their Apple II personal computer at the first West Coast Computer Faire.

History of personal computers

microcomputer revolutionpersonal computer revolutionof the personal computer
Through their work at Apple in the 1970s and 1980s, he and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs are widely recognized as two prominent pioneers of the personal computer revolution.
Steve Wozniak (known as "Woz"), a regular visitor to Homebrew Computer Club meetings, designed the single-board Apple I computer and first demonstrated it there.

Breakout (video game)

BreakoutSuper BreakoutBrick
He was assigned to create a circuit board for the arcade video game Breakout.
It was conceptualized by Nolan Bushnell and Steve Bristow, influenced by the seminal 1972 Atari arcade game Pong, and built by Steve Wozniak, aided by Steve Jobs.

Homebrew Computer Club

homebrewcomputer homebrew
With the Apple I, Wozniak was largely working to impress other members of the Palo Alto-based Homebrew Computer Club, a local group of electronics hobbyists interested in computing.
Several high-profile hackers and computer entrepreneurs emerged from its ranks, including Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, the founders of Apple Computer.

Ronald Wayne

Ron Wayne
On April 1, 1976, Jobs and Wozniak formed Apple Computer Company (now called Apple Inc.) along with administrative supervisor Ronald Wayne, whose participation in the new venture was short-lived.
He co-founded Apple Computer Company (now Apple Inc.) as a partnership with Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs, providing administrative oversight and documentation for the new venture.

Hewlett-Packard

HPHewlett PackardHewlett-Packard Company
Before focusing his attention on Apple, he was employed at Hewlett-Packard (HP) where he designed calculators.
Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple, originally designed the Apple I computer while working at HP and offered it to them under their right of first refusal to his work, but they did not take it up as the company wanted to stay in scientific, business, and industrial markets.

Mike Markkula

A.C. (Mike) MarkkulaClifford "Mike" Markkula Jr.
In November 1976, Jobs and Wozniak received substantial funding from a then-semi-retired Intel product marketing manager and engineer Mike Markkula.
Markkula was introduced to Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak when they were looking for funding to manufacture the Apple II personal computer they had developed, after having sold some units of the first version of this computer, the Apple I.

Blue box

2600 Hza 2600-hertz-soundBlue box (phreaking)
In the early 1970s, Wozniak's blue box design earned him the nickname "Berkeley Blue" in the phreaking community.
Some of the more famous pranksters were Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs, founders of Apple Computer.

Los Altos, California

Los AltosLos Altos, CALos Altos, United States
Together the duo assembled the first boards in Jobs's parents' Los Altos home; initially in his bedroom and later (when there was no space left) in the garage.
In 1976, Apple co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built the first 50 Apple I computers in Jobs's garage in Los Altos.

University of California, Berkeley

UC BerkeleyUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeley
He re-enrolled at De Anza College in Cupertino, before transferring to the University of California, Berkeley in 1971.

US Festival

US Festival 1983 US FestivalLive at the US Festival 1983
In May 1982 and 1983, Wozniak, with help from professional concert promoter Bill Graham, founded the company Unuson, an abbreviation of "unite us in song", which sponsored two US Festivals, with "US" pronounced like the pronoun, not as initials.
Steve Wozniak, cofounder of Apple and creator of the Apple I and Apple II personal computers, believed that the 1970s were the "Me" generation.

Apple II series

Apple IIApple II familyApple
Starting in the mid-1980s, as the Macintosh experienced slow but steady growth, Apple's corporate leadership, including Steve Jobs, increasingly disrespected its flagship cash cow Apple II seriesand Wozniak along with it.
The Apple II series (trademarked with square brackets as "Apple ][" and rendered on later models as "Apple //") is a family of home computers, one of the first highly successful mass-produced microcomputer products, designed primarily by Steve Wozniak, manufactured by Apple Computer (now Apple Inc.), and launched in 1977 with the original Apple II.

Apple III

Apple ///Apple III PlusApple Business BASIC
The Apple II's intended successor, the Apple III, released the same year, was a commercial failure and was discontinued in 1984.
Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak stated that the primary reason for the Apple III's failure was that the system was designed by Apple's marketing department, unlike Apple's previous engineering-driven projects.

Nolan Bushnell

Androbot
According to Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell, Atari offered $100 for each chip that was eliminated in the machine.
Using borrowed parts from Atari, having the main PCB printed up by Atari employee Howard Cantin, and receiving further assistance from Atari employee Ron Wayne, two non-employees, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak—both of whom had previously been involved in the development of the Atari arcade game Breakout—created and marketed their own home computer.

West Coast Computer Faire

Jobs and Wozniak introduced the Apple II at the 1977 West Coast Computer Faire.
It took place on April 16–17, 1977, in San Francisco Civic Auditorium, and saw the debut of the Commodore PET, presented by Chuck Peddle, and the Apple II, presented by then-21-year-old Steve Jobs and 26-year-old Steve Wozniak.

John Sculley

SculleyJohn Scully
He attributed the eventual success of the Macintosh to people like John Sculley "who worked to build a Macintosh market when the Apple II went away".
Sales at Apple increased from $800 million to $8 billion under Sculley's management, although many attribute his success to the fact that Sculley joined the company just when Steve Jobs' visions and Steve Wozniak's creations had become highly lucrative.