Stewart, British Columbia

StewartStewart, BCDistrict Municipality of Stewartthe BC town of Stewart
Stewart is a district municipality at the head of the Portland Canal in northwestern British Columbia, Canada near the Alaskan panhandle.wikipedia
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Portland Canal

Portland Channel
Stewart is a district municipality at the head of the Portland Canal in northwestern British Columbia, Canada near the Alaskan panhandle. Stewart is accessible by highway from the British Columbia highway system, via Highway 37A, by boat through the Portland Canal, or by air through Stewart Airport.
Despite its naming as a canal, the inlet is a fjord, a completely natural and not man-made geographic feature and extends 114.6 km northward from the Portland Inlet at Pearse Island, British Columbia, to Stewart, British Columbia and Hyder, Alaska.

Hyder, Alaska

HyderHyder AKPortland City, Alaska
Nearby Hyder, Alaska, boomed with the discovery of rich silver veins in the upper Salmon River basin in 1917 and 1918.
It sits about 2 mi from Stewart, British Columbia by road, and 75 mi from Ketchikan by air.

Premier, British Columbia

Premierthe town of Premier
Hyder became an access and supply point for the mines, while Stewart served as the port for Canadian mining activity, which was centred on the town of Premier, which was accessed by a 14 mi road from Hyder.
Premier was a large gold mining camp in British Columbia, Canada some 18 miles from Stewart.

The Thing (1982 film)

The Thingfilm of the same nameThe Thing from Another World
The exterior shots from John Carpenter's science fiction classic The Thing were filmed within Salmon Glacier.
Filming lasted roughly 12 weeks, beginning in August 1981, and took place on refrigerated sets in Los Angeles as well as in Juneau, Alaska, and Stewart, British Columbia.

Stewart Aerodrome

Stewart Airport
Stewart is accessible by highway from the British Columbia highway system, via Highway 37A, by boat through the Portland Canal, or by air through Stewart Airport.
Stewart Aerodrome, is located adjacent to Stewart, British Columbia, Canada.

Salmon Glacier

The exterior shots from John Carpenter's science fiction classic The Thing were filmed within Salmon Glacier.
The Salmon Glacier is a glacier located ~25 km north of Stewart, British Columbia, and Hyder, Alaska, just on the Canadian side of the border.

British Columbia Highway 37A

BC 37AHighway 37AHwy 37A
Stewart is accessible by highway from the British Columbia highway system, via Highway 37A, by boat through the Portland Canal, or by air through Stewart Airport.
British Columbia Highway 37A, which is known as the Stewart Highway and also as the Glacier Highway, is a 65 km (40 mi) long spur of Highway 37 west from Meziadin Junction to the border towns of Stewart and Hyder, Alaska, where it connects with Alaska's Salmon River Road.

Tsetsaut

Tsetsaut people
It and the rest of the Portland Canal had been the domain of the Tsetsaut people, also called the Skam-a-Kounst Indians, or Jits'aawit in Nisga'a, an Athapaskan people who became decimated by war and disease and were driven out of the Stewart area by either Haida or Nisga'a in 1856–57.
According to Teit, Tsetsaut territory "...lay in a strip from near Bradfield Canal and the Iskut across the streams flowing into Behm Canal perhaps to about the head of Boca de Quadra. They occupied all of the upper part of Portland Canal around the BC town of Stewart, and Salmon and Bear Rivers. They may have come down the canal as far as Maple Bay. They occupied all the White River and Meziadin Lake basins and one of their original headquarters, especially for salmon fishing, was at Meziadin Lake. They stretched across the head of the Skeena River above the Kuldo River over to Bear and Sustut lakes "

Kitwanga

Kitwanga, British ColumbiaGitwangakKitwanga Junction
Also east is Kitwanga, British Columbia, which is located 218 km from the town, and Dease Lake, British Columbia, which is located 392 km north of Stewart.
North of Kitwanga stands Meziadin Junction (156), Stewart (221), and Dease Lake (488).

Area code 250

250+1-250295
The area code also serves the United States community of Hyder, Alaska, which sits along the border near the town of Stewart.

Granduc Mine

Granduc copper mineGranduc mining development
The mine and its camp are inside the District Municipality of Stewart, connected by an access road connected to Hyder, Alaska and is situated on the Portland inlet.

Area codes 778, 236, and 672

778236672
The area codes also serve the United States community of Hyder, Alaska, which sits along the Canada–United States border near the town of Stewart.

Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine

Kitimat-StikineKitimat-Stikine Regional DistrictKitimat-Stikine Regional District, British Columbia
The other incorporated municipalities in the regional district are the Village of Hazelton, the District of New Hazelton and the District of Stewart.

Dease Lake

Dease Lake, British ColumbiaDease Lake IR No.9Lake Dease
Also east is Kitwanga, British Columbia, which is located 218 km from the town, and Dease Lake, British Columbia, which is located 392 km north of Stewart.
South of Dease Lake is Iskut (65 km), Stewart (398 km), and Kitwanga (489 km).

District municipality

district municipalitiesDistrictJonava district
Stewart is a district municipality at the head of the Portland Canal in northwestern British Columbia, Canada near the Alaskan panhandle.

British Columbia

BCBritish Columbia, CanadaB.C.
Stewart is a district municipality at the head of the Portland Canal in northwestern British Columbia, Canada near the Alaskan panhandle.

Southeast Alaska

Alaska PanhandleAlaskan PanhandleSoutheast
Stewart is a district municipality at the head of the Portland Canal in northwestern British Columbia, Canada near the Alaskan panhandle.

Nisga'a

Nisga'a NationNisga'a peopleNisg̱a'a
The Nisga'a, who lived around the Nass River, called the head of Portland Canal Skam-A-Kounst, meaning "safe house" or "strong house", probably because it served them as a retreat from the harassment of the Haida and Tlingit from the outer coast.

Nass River

NassNass ValleyNass Basin
The Nisga'a, who lived around the Nass River, called the head of Portland Canal Skam-A-Kounst, meaning "safe house" or "strong house", probably because it served them as a retreat from the harassment of the Haida and Tlingit from the outer coast.

Haida people

HaidaKaigani HaidaHaida Nation
The Nisga'a, who lived around the Nass River, called the head of Portland Canal Skam-A-Kounst, meaning "safe house" or "strong house", probably because it served them as a retreat from the harassment of the Haida and Tlingit from the outer coast.

Tlingit

Tlingit peopleInland TlingitTlingits
The Nisga'a, who lived around the Nass River, called the head of Portland Canal Skam-A-Kounst, meaning "safe house" or "strong house", probably because it served them as a retreat from the harassment of the Haida and Tlingit from the outer coast.

Nisga'a language

Nisga'aNisga’a languageNisg̱a’a language
It and the rest of the Portland Canal had been the domain of the Tsetsaut people, also called the Skam-a-Kounst Indians, or Jits'aawit in Nisga'a, an Athapaskan people who became decimated by war and disease and were driven out of the Stewart area by either Haida or Nisga'a in 1856–57.

Athabaskan languages

AthabaskanAthabascanAthabaskan language
It and the rest of the Portland Canal had been the domain of the Tsetsaut people, also called the Skam-a-Kounst Indians, or Jits'aawit in Nisga'a, an Athapaskan people who became decimated by war and disease and were driven out of the Stewart area by either Haida or Nisga'a in 1856–57.