Stock (food)

stockchicken stockfondstocksbeef stocksoup stocksuimonofumetmeat stockbeef
Stock is a flavored liquid preparation.wikipedia
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Soup

soupscanned soupcondensed soup
It forms the basis of many dishes, particularly soups, stews and sauces.
Soup is a primarily liquid food, generally served warm or hot (but may be cool or cold), that is made by combining ingredients of meat or vegetables with stock, or water.

Stew

stewedstewingbeef stew
It forms the basis of many dishes, particularly soups, stews and sauces.
While water can be used as the stew-cooking liquid, stock is also common.

Mirepoix (cuisine)

mirepoixsoffrittowłoszczyzna
Making stocks involves simmering animal bones or meat, seafood, or vegetables in water or wine, adding mirepoix or other aromatics for more flavor. Fish stock is made with fish bones and finely chopped mirepoix. Fish stock should be cooked for 20–25 minutes—cooking any longer spoils the flavour. Concentrated fish stock is called "fish fumet." In Japanese cooking, a fish and kelp stock called dashi is made by briefly (a few minutes) cooking skipjack tuna (bonito) flakes called katsuobushi in nearly boiling water.
Mirepoix is the flavour base for a wide variety of Western dishes: stocks, soups, stews and sauces.

Beef

meatcattleFrozen Beef
Fresh meat makes a superior stock, and cuts rich in connective tissue such as shin or shoulder of beef or veal are commonly recommended, either alone or added in lower proportions to the remains of cooked poultry, to provide a richer and fresher-tasting stock.
The bones are used for making beef stock.

Aspic

kholodetspiftiegelatin
Pork, although a popular base for stock in Chinese cuisine, is considered unsuitable for stock in European cooking due to its greasiness (although 19th-century recipes for consomme and traditional aspic included slices of mild ham), and mutton was traditionally avoided due to the difficulty of avoiding the strong tallowy taint imparted from the fat.
Aspic is a dish in which ingredients are set into a gelatin made from a meat stock or consommé.

Consommé

consommeconsommé soupmadrilene
Pork, although a popular base for stock in Chinese cuisine, is considered unsuitable for stock in European cooking due to its greasiness (although 19th-century recipes for consomme and traditional aspic included slices of mild ham), and mutton was traditionally avoided due to the difficulty of avoiding the strong tallowy taint imparted from the fat.
In cooking, a consommé is a type of clear soup made from richly flavored stock, or bouillon that has been clarified, a process that uses egg whites to remove fat and sediment.

Bouquet garni

bouquet
In classical cuisine, the use of a bouquet garni (or bag of herbs) consisting of parsley, bay leaves, a sprig of thyme, and possibly other herbs, is common.
The bouquet garni (French for "garnished bouquet"; ) is a bundle of herbs usually tied together with string and mainly used to prepare soup, stock, casseroles and various stews.

Dashi

bonito dashibrothdashi stock
Fish stock is made with fish bones and finely chopped mirepoix. Fish stock should be cooked for 20–25 minutes—cooking any longer spoils the flavour. Concentrated fish stock is called "fish fumet." In Japanese cooking, a fish and kelp stock called dashi is made by briefly (a few minutes) cooking skipjack tuna (bonito) flakes called katsuobushi in nearly boiling water.
Dashi is a class of soup and cooking stock used in Japanese cuisine.

Cooking base

basesoup basesoup bases
These are commonly known as bouillon cubes, as cooking base in the US, or as Oxo cubes in Britain, after a common brand of stock cube sold there.
Cooking base, sometimes called soup base, is a concentrated flavoring compound used in place of stock for the creation of soups, sauces, and gravies.

Pressure cooking

pressure cookerpressure cookersretort
A newer approach is to use a pressure cooker.
Food is placed inside the pressure cooker with a small amount of water or other liquid such as stock.

Bouillon cube

stock cubebouillonstock cubes
These are commonly known as bouillon cubes, as cooking base in the US, or as Oxo cubes in Britain, after a common brand of stock cube sold there.
A bouillon cube (Canada and US) or stock cube (Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and UK) or broth cube (Philippines) is dehydrated bouillon (French for broth) or stock formed into a small cube about wide.

Master stock

Master stock is a special Chinese stock used primarily for poaching meats, flavoured with soy sauce, sugar, ginger, garlic, and other aromatics.
A master stock (Chinese: 顶汤) is a stock which is repeatedly reused to poach or braise meats.

Brown stock

Fond brun, or brown stock. The brown color is achieved by roasting the bones and mirepoix. This also adds a rich, full flavour. Veal bones are the most common type used in a fond brun. Tomato paste is often added (sometimes thinned tomato paste is painted onto the roasting bones). The acid in the paste helps break down the connective tissue helping accelerating the formation of gelatin, as well as giving color to the stock.
Brown stock (French: Fond brun or Estouffade) is one of the basic stocks (fonds) in French cuisine.

Parsley

parsley rootfresh parsleygarden parsley
In classical cuisine, the use of a bouquet garni (or bag of herbs) consisting of parsley, bay leaves, a sprig of thyme, and possibly other herbs, is common.
In southern and central Europe, parsley is part of bouquet garni, a bundle of fresh herbs used as an ingredient in stocks, soups, and sauces.

Deglazing (cooking)

deglazingdeglazeddeglaze
Jus is a rich, lightly reduced stock used as a sauce for roasted meats. Many of these are started by deglazing the roasting pan, then reducing to achieve the rich flavour desired.
The pan is returned to the heat, and a liquid such as vegetable or meat stock, a spirit, some wine, or verjuice is added to act as a solvent.

Broth

bouillonchicken brothbeef broth
Broth
In North America, dehydrated meat stock in the form of tablets is called a bouillon cube.

Fish stock (food)

fish stockfish fumetfish broth
Fish stock is made with fish bones and finely chopped mirepoix. Fish stock should be cooked for 20–25 minutes—cooking any longer spoils the flavour. Concentrated fish stock is called "fish fumet." In Japanese cooking, a fish and kelp stock called dashi is made by briefly (a few minutes) cooking skipjack tuna (bonito) flakes called katsuobushi in nearly boiling water.
Stock (food)

Dish (food)

dishdishesfood dishes
It forms the basis of many dishes, particularly soups, stews and sauces.

Sauce

saucesmother saucecream sauce
It forms the basis of many dishes, particularly soups, stews and sauces.

Simmering

simmersimmeredKaiserebersdorf
Traditionally, stock is made by simmering various ingredients in water.

Poultry

drumstickdomestic fowlpoultry meat
; Meat: Leftover cooked meat, such as that remaining on poultry carcasses, is often used along with the bones of the bird or joint.

Veal

veal cratescalfmilk veal
Fresh meat makes a superior stock, and cuts rich in connective tissue such as shin or shoulder of beef or veal are commonly recommended, either alone or added in lower proportions to the remains of cooked poultry, to provide a richer and fresher-tasting stock. Fond brun, or brown stock. The brown color is achieved by roasting the bones and mirepoix. This also adds a rich, full flavour. Veal bones are the most common type used in a fond brun. Tomato paste is often added (sometimes thinned tomato paste is painted onto the roasting bones). The acid in the paste helps break down the connective tissue helping accelerating the formation of gelatin, as well as giving color to the stock.

Pork

pig meatpigpigs
Pork, although a popular base for stock in Chinese cuisine, is considered unsuitable for stock in European cooking due to its greasiness (although 19th-century recipes for consomme and traditional aspic included slices of mild ham), and mutton was traditionally avoided due to the difficulty of avoiding the strong tallowy taint imparted from the fat.

Chinese cuisine

ChineseChinese restaurantChina
Pork, although a popular base for stock in Chinese cuisine, is considered unsuitable for stock in European cooking due to its greasiness (although 19th-century recipes for consomme and traditional aspic included slices of mild ham), and mutton was traditionally avoided due to the difficulty of avoiding the strong tallowy taint imparted from the fat.

Ham

dry-cured hamsmoked hamdry-cured
Pork, although a popular base for stock in Chinese cuisine, is considered unsuitable for stock in European cooking due to its greasiness (although 19th-century recipes for consomme and traditional aspic included slices of mild ham), and mutton was traditionally avoided due to the difficulty of avoiding the strong tallowy taint imparted from the fat.