Stone (unit)

ststonestonestwo stone10stimperial stoneperest.
The stone or stone weight (abbreviation: st.) is an English and imperial unit of mass now equal to 14 pounds (6.35029318 kg).wikipedia
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Human body weight

body massbody weightweight
With the advent of metrication, Europe's various "stones" were superseded by or adapted to the kilogram from the mid-19th century on. The stone continues in customary use in Britain and Ireland used for measuring body weight, but was prohibited for commercial use in the UK by the Weights and Measures Act of 1985.
Body weight is measured in kilograms, a measure of mass, throughout the world, although in some countries such as the United States it is measured in pounds, or as in the United Kingdom, stones and pounds.

Imperial units

imperialimperial systemimperial unit
The stone or stone weight (abbreviation: st.) is an English and imperial unit of mass now equal to 14 pounds (6.35029318 kg). The United Kingdom's imperial system adopted the wool stone of 14 pounds in 1835.

Scottish units

ScottishScottish measuresBoll
The Scottish stone was equal to 16 Scottish pounds (17 lb 8 oz avoirdupois or 7.936 kg).
The system was based on the ell (length), stone (mass), and boll and firlot (volume).

English units

EnglishEnglish unitEnglish system
The stone or stone weight (abbreviation: st.) is an English and imperial unit of mass now equal to 14 pounds (6.35029318 kg).
Stone (st) : 14 lb (see Stone (unit) for other values)

Metrication

metrificationmetricatedadopted
With the advent of metrication, Europe's various "stones" were superseded by or adapted to the kilogram from the mid-19th century on. The stone continues in customary use in Britain and Ireland used for measuring body weight, but was prohibited for commercial use in the UK by the Weights and Measures Act of 1985.
In popular conversation, the stone unit is widely used for measuring a person's weight and feet and inches for height.

Weights and Measures Acts (UK)

Weights and Measures ActWeights and MeasuresWeights and Measures Act 1985
With the advent of metrication, Europe's various "stones" were superseded by or adapted to the kilogram from the mid-19th century on. The stone continues in customary use in Britain and Ireland used for measuring body weight, but was prohibited for commercial use in the UK by the Weights and Measures Act of 1985. The United Kingdom's imperial system adopted the wool stone of 14 pounds in 1835. The Assize of Weights and Measures, a statute of uncertain date from c.
Established the imperial stone & hundredweight of 14 and 112 lbs. respectively, based on the wool stone of Edward III

Pound (mass)

lbpoundspound
The stone or stone weight (abbreviation: st.) is an English and imperial unit of mass now equal to 14 pounds (6.35029318 kg). England and other Germanic-speaking countries of northern Europe formerly used various standardised "stones" for trade, with their values ranging from about 5 to 40 local pounds (roughly 3 to 15 kg) depending on the location and objects weighed. 1300, describes stones of 5 merchants' pounds used for glass; stones of 8 lb. used for beeswax, sugar, pepper, alum, cumin, almonds, cinnamon, and nutmegs; stones of 12 lb. used for lead; and the London stone of 12 1⁄2 lb. used for wool.
When used as a measurement of body weight the UK practice remains to use the stone of 14 pounds as the primary measure e.g. "11 stone 4 pounds", rather than "158 pounds" (as done in the US), or "72 kilograms" as used elsewhere.

Sack (unit)

sacksacksSacks of wool
Sack, a unit of wool equal to 28 stone
The wool sack or woolsack (saccus lanae or lane) was standardized as 2 wey of 14 stone each, with each stone 12½ merchants' pounds each (350 lbs. or about 153 kg), by the time of the Assize of Weights and Measures c.

Mass

inertial massgravitational massweight
The stone or stone weight (abbreviation: st.) is an English and imperial unit of mass now equal to 14 pounds (6.35029318 kg).

Kingdom of England

EnglandEnglishAnglo
England and other Germanic-speaking countries of northern Europe formerly used various standardised "stones" for trade, with their values ranging from about 5 to 40 local pounds (roughly 3 to 15 kg) depending on the location and objects weighed.

Germanic languages

GermanicGermanic languageGerman
England and other Germanic-speaking countries of northern Europe formerly used various standardised "stones" for trade, with their values ranging from about 5 to 40 local pounds (roughly 3 to 15 kg) depending on the location and objects weighed.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United KingdomBritishUK
The United Kingdom's imperial system adopted the wool stone of 14 pounds in 1835.

Halakha

Jewish lawhalakhichalachic
The Biblical law against the carrying of "diverse weights, a large and a small" is more literally translated as "you shall not carry a stone and a stone, a large and a small".

Ancient Roman units of measurement

libraRomanRoman feet
There was no standardised "stone" in the ancient Jewish world, but in Roman times stone weights were crafted to multiples of the Roman pound.

Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library

Cushing CenterCushing/Whitney Medical LibraryMedical Historical Library at Yale
Such weights varied in quality: the Yale Medical Library holds 10 and 50-pound examples of polished serpentine, while a 40-pound example at the Eschborn Museum is made of sandstone.

Serpentine subgroup

serpentineantigoriteserpentine group
Such weights varied in quality: the Yale Medical Library holds 10 and 50-pound examples of polished serpentine, while a 40-pound example at the Eschborn Museum is made of sandstone.

Eschborn

Eschborn, GermanyNiederhöchstadt
Such weights varied in quality: the Yale Medical Library holds 10 and 50-pound examples of polished serpentine, while a 40-pound example at the Eschborn Museum is made of sandstone.

Statutes of uncertain date

statute of uncertain date
The Assize of Weights and Measures, a statute of uncertain date from c.

Beeswax

waxbees waxbee wax
1300, describes stones of 5 merchants' pounds used for glass; stones of 8 lb. used for beeswax, sugar, pepper, alum, cumin, almonds, cinnamon, and nutmegs; stones of 12 lb. used for lead; and the London stone of 12 1⁄2 lb. used for wool.

Sugar

sugarssugar tradesugar cube
1300, describes stones of 5 merchants' pounds used for glass; stones of 8 lb. used for beeswax, sugar, pepper, alum, cumin, almonds, cinnamon, and nutmegs; stones of 12 lb. used for lead; and the London stone of 12 1⁄2 lb. used for wool.

Black pepper

pepperwhite pepperpeppercorn
1300, describes stones of 5 merchants' pounds used for glass; stones of 8 lb. used for beeswax, sugar, pepper, alum, cumin, almonds, cinnamon, and nutmegs; stones of 12 lb. used for lead; and the London stone of 12 1⁄2 lb. used for wool.

Alum

Allumalum compoundsAluminium potassium sulfate
1300, describes stones of 5 merchants' pounds used for glass; stones of 8 lb. used for beeswax, sugar, pepper, alum, cumin, almonds, cinnamon, and nutmegs; stones of 12 lb. used for lead; and the London stone of 12 1⁄2 lb. used for wool.

Cumin

cumin seedcumin seedsjeera
1300, describes stones of 5 merchants' pounds used for glass; stones of 8 lb. used for beeswax, sugar, pepper, alum, cumin, almonds, cinnamon, and nutmegs; stones of 12 lb. used for lead; and the London stone of 12 1⁄2 lb. used for wool.

Almond

almondsbitter almondalmond oil
1300, describes stones of 5 merchants' pounds used for glass; stones of 8 lb. used for beeswax, sugar, pepper, alum, cumin, almonds, cinnamon, and nutmegs; stones of 12 lb. used for lead; and the London stone of 12 1⁄2 lb. used for wool.

Cinnamon

cinnamon stickscinnamon treecinnamon bark
1300, describes stones of 5 merchants' pounds used for glass; stones of 8 lb. used for beeswax, sugar, pepper, alum, cumin, almonds, cinnamon, and nutmegs; stones of 12 lb. used for lead; and the London stone of 12 1⁄2 lb. used for wool.