Stork Club

The Stork ClubStork Club nightclub
The Stork Club was a nightclub in Manhattan, New York City which during its existence from 1929 to 1965 was one of the most prestigious clubs in the world.wikipedia
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Nightclub

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The Stork Club was a nightclub in Manhattan, New York City which during its existence from 1929 to 1965 was one of the most prestigious clubs in the world.
With the repeal of Prohibition in February 1933, nightclubs were revived, such as New York's 21 Club, Copacabana, El Morocco, and the Stork Club.

Sherman Billingsley

The club was established on West 58th Street in 1929 by Sherman Billingsley, a former bootlegger from Enid, Oklahoma.
John Sherman Billingsley (March 10, 1896 – October 4, 1966) was an American nightclub owner and former bootlegger who was the founder and owner of New York's Stork Club.

Toots Shor's Restaurant

Toots ShorChophouse
New York City's El Morocco had the sophistication and Toots Shor's drew the sporting crowd, but the Stork Club mixed power, money, and glamor.
It was frequented by celebrities, and together with the 21 Club, the Stork Club, and El Morocco was one of the places to see and be seen.

Ed Sullivan

SullivanThe Ed Sullivan ShowEd Sullivan Productions
One of those who phoned Gray's program was television personality and columnist Ed Sullivan, a professional rival of Winchell's whose "home base" was the El Morocco nightclub.
Sullivan soon became a powerful starmaker in the entertainment world himself, becoming one of Winchell's main rivals, setting the El Morocco nightclub in New York as his unofficial headquarters against Winchell's seat of power at the nearby Stork Club.

Paley Park

The site is now the location of Paley Park, a small vest-pocket park.
Paley Park is a pocket park located at 3 East 53rd Street between Madison and Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan on the former site of the Stork Club.

Café society

cafe society
A symbol of café society, the wealthy elite, including movie stars, celebrities, showgirls, and aristocrats all mixed in the VIP Cub Room of the club.
Some of the American night clubs and New York City restaurants frequented by the denizens of café society included the 21 Club, El Morocco, Restaurant Larue and the Stork Club.

Walter Winchell

WinchellWalter WinchelWalter Winchell’s Journal
A head waiter known as "Saint Peter" determined who was allowed entry to the Cub Room, where Walter Winchell wrote his columns and broadcast his radio programs from Table 50.
While on an American tour in 1951, Josephine Baker, who would never perform before segregated audiences, criticized the Stork Club's unwritten policy of discouraging black patrons, then scolded Winchell, an old ally, for not rising to her defense.

53rd Street (Manhattan)

53rd StreetWest 53rd Street53rd
From 1934 until its closure in 1965, it was located at 3 East 53rd Street, just east of Fifth Avenue, when it became world-renowned with its celebrity clientele and luxury.

Ethel Merman

MermanEthel Agnes Zimmermann
Billingsley's long-standing relationship with Ethel Merman, which began in 1939, brought the theater crowd to the Stork; there, she had a waiter assigned to her whose job was just to light her cigarettes.
Shortly after the opening of the latter, Merman—still despondent about the end of her affair with Stork Club owner Sherman Billingsley—married her first husband, Treacher's agent, William Smith.

Josephine Baker

Joséphine BakerJosephine Baker Daydanse sauvage
On October 19, 1951, Josephine Baker made charges of racism against the Stork Club.
An incident at the Stork Club interrupted and overturned her plans.

Lucius Beebe

Lucius Morris Beebe
Society writer Lucius Beebe wrote in 1946: "To millions and millions of people all of over the world the Stork symbolizes and epitomizes the de luxe upholstery of quintessentially urban existence. It means fame; it means wealth; it means an elegant way of life among celebrated folk".
He wrote a syndicated column for the New York Herald Tribune from the 1930s through 1944 called This New York. The column chronicled the doings of fashionable society at such storied restaurants and nightclubs as El Morocco, the 21 Club, the Stork Club, and The Colony.

J. Edgar Hoover

HooverJ Edgar HooverJohn Edgar Hoover
Because of Billingsley's long-standing friendship with Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) head J. Edgar Hoover, rumors persisted that the Stork Club was bugged. Notable guests through the years included Lucille Ball, Tallulah Bankhead, Joan Blondell, Charlie Chaplin, Frank Costello, Bing Crosby, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Brenda Frazier, Dorothy Frooks, Carmen Miranda, Dana Andrews, Michael O'Shea, Judy Garland, the Harrimans, Ernest Hemingway, Judy Holliday, J. Edgar Hoover, Grace Kelly, the Kennedys, Dorothy Kilgallen, Dorothy Lamour, Robert M. McBride, Vincent Price, Marilyn Monroe, the Nordstrom Sisters, Erik Rhodes, the Roosevelts, Ramón Rivero, J. D. Salinger, Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, Gene Tierney, Mike Todd, and Gloria Vanderbilt.
According to Anthony Summers, Hoover often frequented New York City's Stork Club.

Gene Tierney

Countess Oleg Cassini LoiewskiGene Tierney Lee
Notable guests through the years included Lucille Ball, Tallulah Bankhead, Joan Blondell, Charlie Chaplin, Frank Costello, Bing Crosby, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Brenda Frazier, Dorothy Frooks, Carmen Miranda, Dana Andrews, Michael O'Shea, Judy Garland, the Harrimans, Ernest Hemingway, Judy Holliday, J. Edgar Hoover, Grace Kelly, the Kennedys, Dorothy Kilgallen, Dorothy Lamour, Robert M. McBride, Vincent Price, Marilyn Monroe, the Nordstrom Sisters, Erik Rhodes, the Roosevelts, Ramón Rivero, J. D. Salinger, Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, Gene Tierney, Mike Todd, and Gloria Vanderbilt.
Later that night, Zanuck dropped by the Stork Club, where he saw a young lady on the dance floor.

Brenda Frazier

Notable guests through the years included Lucille Ball, Tallulah Bankhead, Joan Blondell, Charlie Chaplin, Frank Costello, Bing Crosby, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Brenda Frazier, Dorothy Frooks, Carmen Miranda, Dana Andrews, Michael O'Shea, Judy Garland, the Harrimans, Ernest Hemingway, Judy Holliday, J. Edgar Hoover, Grace Kelly, the Kennedys, Dorothy Kilgallen, Dorothy Lamour, Robert M. McBride, Vincent Price, Marilyn Monroe, the Nordstrom Sisters, Erik Rhodes, the Roosevelts, Ramón Rivero, J. D. Salinger, Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, Gene Tierney, Mike Todd, and Gloria Vanderbilt.
She added, "One reason I went to the Stork Club so often was that Sherman Billingsley, to attract debutantes, served us lunch for just a dollar apiece."

The Stork Club (film)

The Stork ClubThe Stork Club'' (film)
The Stork Club was also featured in several movies, including The Stork Club (1945), Executive Suite (1954), Artists and Models (1955), and My Favorite Year (1982).
Judy Peabody (Betty Hutton) is a hat-check girl at New York's popular Stork Club nightclub.

All About Eve

Margo ChanningEve Harrington1950 film
In All About Eve (1950), the characters played by Bette Davis, Gary Merrill, Anne Baxter and George Sanders are shown in the Cub Room of the Stork Club.
That evening, Margo and Bill announce their engagement at dinner with the Richardses in the Cub Room of the Stork Club.

The Wrong Man

1956Christopher Emmanuel Balestrero
The Alfred Hitchcock film The Wrong Man (1957) starred Henry Fonda as real-life Stork Club bassist Christopher Emanuel Balestrero ("Manny"), who was falsely accused of committing robberies around New York City.
Manny Balestrero (Henry Fonda), a down-on-his-luck musician at New York City's Stork Club, needs $300 for dental work for his wife Rose (Vera Miles).

Vera Caspary

The television show was an adaptation of Vera Caspary's 1946 mystery novel, The Murder in the Stork Club, where the action took place in and around the famous nightclub, with Sherman Billingsley and other real-life characters appearing in the plot.
However, Caspary cabled Igee that he could have the film rights to Bedelia for a British production, if she could be brought over to write the screenplay, thus putting into motion a plan involving two British ministries, J. Arthur Rank, the State Department, Good Housekeeping, the Stork Club and the White House, which brought her to England.

Le Galion

Some of the best known examples were the gifts of Sortilège perfume by Le Galion, which became known as the "fragrance of the Stork Club".
Le Galion was considered such a luxurious item that the Sortilège perfumes were once given as gifts at The Stork Club of New York City, associated with its wealthy clientele, which led it to becoming known as the "fragrance of the Stork Club".

Goodman Ace

Jack Benny invited longtime friend, writer, and performer Goodman Ace to lunch with him at the Stork.
Benny was inadvertently responsible for a very funny exchange of letters between Ace and the owner of the Stork Club, Sherman Billingsley.

Ramón Rivero

Ramón "Diplo" RiveroRamón Rivero "DiploDiplo
Notable guests through the years included Lucille Ball, Tallulah Bankhead, Joan Blondell, Charlie Chaplin, Frank Costello, Bing Crosby, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Brenda Frazier, Dorothy Frooks, Carmen Miranda, Dana Andrews, Michael O'Shea, Judy Garland, the Harrimans, Ernest Hemingway, Judy Holliday, J. Edgar Hoover, Grace Kelly, the Kennedys, Dorothy Kilgallen, Dorothy Lamour, Robert M. McBride, Vincent Price, Marilyn Monroe, the Nordstrom Sisters, Erik Rhodes, the Roosevelts, Ramón Rivero, J. D. Salinger, Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, Gene Tierney, Mike Todd, and Gloria Vanderbilt.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
The Stork Club was a nightclub in Manhattan, New York City which during its existence from 1929 to 1965 was one of the most prestigious clubs in the world.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The Stork Club was a nightclub in Manhattan, New York City which during its existence from 1929 to 1965 was one of the most prestigious clubs in the world.

Showgirl

Las Vegas showgirlchorineshow girl
A symbol of café society, the wealthy elite, including movie stars, celebrities, showgirls, and aristocrats all mixed in the VIP Cub Room of the club.