A report on Storm

The Great Red Spot on Jupiter
A snow blockade in southern Minnesota in 1881
A return stroke, cloud-to-ground lightning strike during a thunderstorm.
A sunshower storm in the Mojave desert at sunset.
Effect of wind shear on aircraft trajectory. Merely correcting for the initial gust front can have dire consequences.
The Great Wave off Kanagawa, an 1831 ukiyo-e print by Hokusai
Rembrandt's 1633 The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.
Lightning within the cloud causes the entire blanket to illuminate.
High Desert storm approaches at sunset.
Heavy storm brought by Severe Tropical Storm Sanvu in Hong Kong.
Winter North Atlantic storm strength Beaufort 9 causing extremely high waves.
Storm waves coming abeam from starboard, causing water on deck.

Any disturbed state of an environment or in an astronomical body's atmosphere especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather.

- Storm
The Great Red Spot on Jupiter

13 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Hurricane Isabel in 2003 as seen from the International Space Station. The eye, eyewall, and surrounding rainbands, characteristics of tropical cyclones in the narrow sense, are clearly visible in this view from space.

Tropical cyclone

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Hurricane Isabel in 2003 as seen from the International Space Station. The eye, eyewall, and surrounding rainbands, characteristics of tropical cyclones in the narrow sense, are clearly visible in this view from space.
Diagram of a tropical cyclone in the Northern hemisphere
Hurricane Paulette, in 2020, is an example of a sheared tropical cyclone, with deep convection slightly removed from the center of the system.
Thunderstorm activity in the eyewall of Cyclone Bansi as seen from the International Space Station, on January 12, 2015
Storm track of Typhoon Ioke, showing recurvature off the Japanese coast in 2006
Three tropical cyclones of the 2006 Pacific typhoon season at different stages of development. The weakest (left) demonstrates only the most basic circular shape. A stronger storm (top right) demonstrates spiral banding and increased centralization, while the strongest (lower right) has developed an eye.
Relief efforts for Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas
Sunset view of Hurricane Isidore's rainbands photographed at 7000 ft
"Hurricane Hunter" – WP-3D Orion is used to go into the eye of a hurricane for data collection and measurements purposes.
A general decrease in error trends in tropical cyclone path prediction is evident since the 1970s
Aftermath of the Hurricane Ike in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas

A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain and/or squalls.

24-hour animation of Cyclone Xynthia crossing France

European windstorm

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24-hour animation of Cyclone Xynthia crossing France
Conceptual model for a European Windstorm and the associated strong wind "footprints". Note that storm track, footprint locations and footprint sizes vary by case, and that all footprints are not always present.
2015 list of storm names from UK Met Office and Met Éireann
Satellite picture of Cyclone Ulli on 3 January 2012
A fictitious synoptic chart of an extratropical cyclone affecting Great Britain & Ireland. The blue and red arrows between isobars indicate the direction of the wind and its relative temperature, while the "L" symbol denotes the center of the "low". Note the occluded cold and warm frontal boundaries.
Damaged pylon in Germany after Windstorm Kyrill 2007
Contemporary picture of the flood that struck the North Sea coast of Germany and Denmark in October 1634.

European windstorms are powerful extratropical cyclones which form as cyclonic windstorms associated with areas of low atmospheric pressure.

An extratropical cyclone near Iceland on September 4, 2003

Cyclone

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Large air mass that rotates around a strong center of low atmospheric pressure, counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere as viewed from above .

Large air mass that rotates around a strong center of low atmospheric pressure, counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere as viewed from above .

An extratropical cyclone near Iceland on September 4, 2003
Comparison between extratropical and tropical cyclones on surface analysis
The initial extratropical low-pressure area forms at the location of the red dot on the image. It is usually perpendicular (at a right angle to) the leaf-like cloud formation seen on satellite during the early stage of cyclogenesis. The location of the axis of the upper level jet stream is in light blue.
Tropical cyclones form when the energy released by the condensation of moisture in rising air causes a positive feedback loop over warm ocean waters.
A fictitious synoptic chart of an extratropical cyclone affecting the UK and Ireland. The blue arrows between isobars indicate the direction of the wind, while the "L" symbol denotes the centre of the "low". Note the occluded, cold and warm frontal boundaries.
A polar low over the Sea of Japan in December 2009
Subtropical Storm Alex in the north Atlantic Ocean in January 2016
2017 Atlantic hurricane season summary map
Hurricane Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004
Cyclone on Mars, imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope
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{{center|1=Pacific hurricane}}
{{center|1=Pacific typhoon}}
{{center|1=North Indian Ocean cyclone}}
{{center|1=South Pacific cyclone}}
{{center|1=Australian region cyclone}}
{{center|1=South-West Indian Ocean cyclone}}

A tropical cyclone is a storm system characterized by a low-pressure center and numerous thunderstorms that produce strong winds and flooding rain.

Cherry tree moving with the wind blowing about 22 m/sec (about 79 km/h or 49 mph)

Wind

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Natural movement of air or other gases relative to a planet's surface.

Natural movement of air or other gases relative to a planet's surface.

Cherry tree moving with the wind blowing about 22 m/sec (about 79 km/h or 49 mph)
Surface analysis of the Great Blizzard of 1888. Areas with greater isobaric packing indicate higher winds.
Cup-type anemometer with vertical axis, a sensor on a remote meteorological station
An occluded mesocyclone tornado (Oklahoma, May 1999)
Wind plotting within a station model
The westerlies and trade winds
Winds are part of Earth's atmospheric circulation
Benjamin Franklin's map of the Gulf Stream
Local winds around the world. These winds are formed through the heating of land (from mountains or flat terrain)
A: Sea breeze (occurs at daytime), B: Land breeze (occurs at nighttime)
Mountain wave schematic. The wind flows towards a mountain and produces a first oscillation (A). A second wave occurs further away and higher. The lenticular clouds form at the peak of the waves (B).
Hodograph plot of wind vectors at various heights in the troposphere, which is used to diagnose vertical wind shear
RAF Exeter airfield on 20 May 1944, showing the layout of the runways that allow aircraft to take off and land into the wind
This wind turbine generates electricity from wind power.
Otto Lilienthal in flight
A rock formation in the Altiplano, Bolivia, sculpted by wind erosion
Tumbleweed blown against a fence
In the montane forest of Olympic National Park, windthrow opens the canopy and increases light intensity on the understory.
Damage from Hurricane Andrew
A possible future for Earth due to the planetary wind: Venus

Long-duration winds have various names associated with their average strength, such as breeze, gale, storm, and hurricane.

Heavy snow during the January 2016 United States blizzard.

Blizzard

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Severe snowstorm characterized by strong sustained winds and low visibility, lasting for a prolonged period of time—typically at least three or four hours.

Severe snowstorm characterized by strong sustained winds and low visibility, lasting for a prolonged period of time—typically at least three or four hours.

Heavy snow during the January 2016 United States blizzard.
Blizzard into Tochal Skiing resort, Tehran and involved skiers.
Drifted snow near Burrow-with-Burrow, Lancashire, England, January 1963
Near-whiteout conditions dim the far end of Times Square in New York City, 2015.
March blizzard in North Dakota, 1966.
The Brooklyn Bridge during the Great Blizzard of 1888.
Conditions approaching a blizzard whiteout in Minnesota, on March 1, 2007. Note the unclear horizon near the center.
Illustration of the Great Blizzard of 1888
A snow blockade in southern Minnesota, central US. On March 29, 1881, snowdrifts in Minnesota were higher than locomotives.
Stereoscopic view card showing "Blasting ice with dynamite from in front of steamer on the ways, by Stanley J. Morrow" ~ A view of Yankton's riverfront after the flood of March 1881.
Under the weight of snow, a tree falls next to a car in Asheville, North Carolina

A nor'easter is a macro-scale storm that occurs off the New England and Atlantic Canada coastlines.

Coastal flooding during Hurricane Lili in 2002 on Louisiana Highway 1

Coastal flooding

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Submerged by seawater.

Submerged by seawater.

Coastal flooding during Hurricane Lili in 2002 on Louisiana Highway 1
Storm surge from Hurricane Carol in 1954
Groynes are engineered structures that aim to prevent erosion of the beach front
Mangroves are one of the coasts natural defense systems against storm surges and flooding. Their high biomass both above and below the water can help dissipate wave energy.
The Thames Barrier provides flood control for London, U.K.
Significant flooding in New Orleans as a result of Hurricane Katrina and the failure of the city's flood protection systems
A village near the coast of Sumatra lies in ruin on 2 January 2005 after the devastating tsunami that struck on Boxing Day 2004

Storms, including hurricanes and tropical cyclones, can cause flooding through storm surges which are waves significantly larger than normal.

Heavy snowfall and strong winds during a 2016 blizzard, New York City

Winter storm

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Event in which wind coincides with varieties of precipitation that only occur at freezing temperatures, such as snow, mixed snow and rain, or freezing rain.

Event in which wind coincides with varieties of precipitation that only occur at freezing temperatures, such as snow, mixed snow and rain, or freezing rain.

Heavy snowfall and strong winds during a 2016 blizzard, New York City
National Guard members clear a road of fallen trees after a February 2021 winter storm in Putnam County, West Virginia.
Snow storm in Modena, Italy
Wet snow and sleet during a winter storm, on the deck of RFA Tidespring south of Plymouth in the English Channel.
Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages.
Crabapple covered in icy glaze due to freezing rain. Ice storms often coat many surfaces. Severe ice storms, which may occur in spring, can kill plant life.
2008 Chinese winter storm in Hefei, Anhui Province, China

Severe winter weather conditions called "winter storms", can be local weather fulfilling the criteria for 24 hours, or large storm systems covering part of a continent for several days.

A shelf cloud along the leading edge of a derecho in Minnesota

Derecho

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A shelf cloud along the leading edge of a derecho in Minnesota
Development of derechos
Composite radar image of the June 2012 North American derecho (a progressive derecho) as it moved from Indiana to Virginia
A typical multi-bow serial derecho
A typical progressive derecho
This image shows derecho frequency for the lower 48 United States
Damage to the Väike-Maarja Church in Estonia after the derecho hit on 8 August 2010
Trees felled by downbursts in the Boundary Waters – Canadian derecho of 1999
Barn in Mount Solon, Virginia, destroyed by June 2012 North American derecho

A derecho (, from derecho, "straight" as in direction) is a widespread, long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms known as a mesoscale convective system.

Hard rain on a roof

Rain

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Liquid water in the form of droplets that have condensed from atmospheric water vapor and then become heavy enough to fall under gravity.

Liquid water in the form of droplets that have condensed from atmospheric water vapor and then become heavy enough to fall under gravity.

Hard rain on a roof
Rain falling on a field, in southern Estonia
Streets in Tampere, Finland watered by night rain.
The shape of rain drops depending upon their size
Black Rain Clouds
A raindrop on a leaf
Convective precipitation
Orographic precipitation
Rainfall distribution by month in Cairns showing the extent of the wet season at that location
Image of Atlanta, US showing temperature distribution, with blue showing cool temperatures, red warm, and hot areas appearing white.
Average surface air temperatures from 2011 to 2020 compared to the 1951–1980 average. Source: NASA
Band of thunderstorms seen on a weather radar display
Sources of acid rain
Updated Köppen–Geiger climate map
Standard rain gauge
Twenty-four-hour rainfall accumulation on the Val d'Irène radar in Eastern Canada. Zones without data in the east and southwest are caused by beam blocking from mountains. (Source: Environment Canada)
Example of a five-day rainfall forecast from the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center
Rainfall estimates for southern Japan and the surrounding region from July 20–27, 2009.
A rain dance being performed in Harar, Ethiopia
Rain, depicted in the 1493 Nuremberg Chronicle
Largest deserts
Isolated towering vertical desert shower
Long-term mean precipitation by month

The humid subtropical climate zone is where winter rainfall is associated with large storms that the westerlies steer from west to east.

A clockwise spinning low-pressure area or cyclone of southern Australia. The center of the spiral-shaped cloud system is also the center of the low.

Low-pressure area

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Diverging winds aloft, ahead of these troughs, cause atmospheric lift within the troposphere below as air flows upwards away from the surface, which lowers surface pressures as this upward motion partially counteracts the force of gravity packing the air close to the ground.

Diverging winds aloft, ahead of these troughs, cause atmospheric lift within the troposphere below as air flows upwards away from the surface, which lowers surface pressures as this upward motion partially counteracts the force of gravity packing the air close to the ground.

A clockwise spinning low-pressure area or cyclone of southern Australia. The center of the spiral-shaped cloud system is also the center of the low.
A low-pressure system over Iceland.
This depiction of the Hadley cell shows the process which sustains low-pressure areas. Diverging winds aloft allow for lower pressure and convergence at the Earth's surface, which leads to upward motion.
QuikSCAT image of typical extratropical cyclones over the ocean. Note the maximum winds on the poleward side of the occluded front.
February position of the ITCZ and monsoon trough in the Pacific Ocean, depicted by area of convergent streamlines offshore Australia and in the equatorial eastern Pacific
Infrared image of a powerful northern hemisphere cyclone, Megi, at its peak intensity
Schematic representation of flow (represented in black) around a low-pressure area in the Northern hemisphere. The pressure-gradient force is represented by blue arrows, the Coriolis acceleration (always perpendicular to the velocity) by red arrows.

A hurricane is a storm that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and a tropical cyclone occurs in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean.