Storm chasing

storm chaserstorm chaserschasersstormchasingatmospheric researchchasechasedchaserhurricane hunterStormchaser
Storm chasing is broadly defined as the pursuit of any severe weather condition, regardless of motive, which can be curiosity, adventure, scientific investigation, or for news or media coverage.wikipedia
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David K. Hoadley

David Hoadley
The first recognized storm chaser is David Hoadley (1938– ), who began chasing North Dakota storms in 1956, systematically using data from area weather offices and airports.
David K. Hoadley (born 1938) is the first known storm chaser and was founder of Storm Track magazine.

Neil B. Ward

Neil Ward
Bringing research chasing to the forefront was Neil B. Ward (1914–1972) who in the 1950s and 1960s enlisted the help of Oklahoma Highway Patrol to study storms.
Neil Burgher Ward (June 26, 1914 – April 12, 1972), American meteorologist, was the first scientific storm chaser, and second known storm chaser, developing ideas of thunderstorm and tornado structure and evolution as well as techniques for forecasting and intercept.

Storm Track

Storm Track (magazine)
He is widely considered the pioneer storm chaser and was the founder of Storm Track magazine.
Storm Track was the first magazine for and about storm chasing.

Twister (1996 film)

TwisterTwister: Music from the Motion Picture SoundtrackTwister Soundtrack
Storm chasing then reached popular culture in three major spurts: in 1978 with the broadcast of an episode of the television program In Search of...; in 1985 with a documentary on the PBS series Nova; and in May 1996 with the theatrical release of Twister which provided an action-packed but distorted glimpse at the hobby.
The film stars Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton, Jami Gertz and Cary Elwes, and depicts a group of storm chasers researching tornadoes during a severe outbreak in Oklahoma.

Storm Chasers (TV series)

Storm ChasersStorm Chasers'' (TV series)
The 2007–2011 Discovery Channel reality series Storm Chasers produced another surge in activity.
Produced by Original Media, the program follows several teams of storm chasers as they attempt to intercept tornadoes in Tornado Alley in the United States.

Union City, Oklahoma

Union City
It culminated in a brilliant success in 1973 with the Union City, Oklahoma tornado providing a foundation for tornado and supercell morphology that proved the efficacy of storm chasing field research.
On May 24, 1973, a tornado rated F4 struck the Union City area and was the first tornado widely documented by science as part of storm chasing field research.

Nova (American TV program)

NovaPBS NovaNova (TV series)
Storm chasing then reached popular culture in three major spurts: in 1978 with the broadcast of an episode of the television program In Search of...; in 1985 with a documentary on the PBS series Nova; and in May 1996 with the theatrical release of Twister which provided an action-packed but distorted glimpse at the hobby.
storm chasing,

Tornado Alley

climatologically pronetornadotornado-heavy area
Storm chasers are most active in the spring and early summer, particularly May and June, across the Great Plains of the United States (extending into Canada) in an area colloquially known as Tornado Alley, with many hundred individuals active on some days during this period.
It is largely a media-driven term although tornado climatologists distinguish peaks in activity in certain areas and storm chasers have long recognized the Great Plains tornado belt.

Storm spotting

storm spotterstorm spottersspotter
Many chasers also are storm spotters, reporting their observations of hazardous weather to relevant authorities.
At about the same time, early storm chasers were popularized and associated with spotters.

Tim Samaras

Paul Samaras
Engineer Tim Samaras, his photographer son Paul, and meteorologist Carl Young were killed doing in situ probe and infrasonic field research by an exceptional combination of events in which an already large and rain-obscured tornado swelled within less than a minute to 2.6 mi wide simultaneously as it changed direction and accelerated.
Timothy Michael Samaras (November 12, 1957 – May 31, 2013) was an American engineer and storm chaser best known for his field research on tornadoes and time on the Discovery Channel show, Storm Chasers.

Supercell

supercell thunderstormsupercell thunderstormsforward flank downdraft
Not only are the most intense supercells common here, but due to the moisture profile of the atmosphere the storms tend to be more visible than locations farther east where there are also frequent severe thunderstorms.
This is where observations by storm spotter and storm chasers may be of vital importance in addition to Doppler velocity (and polarimetric) radar data.

Tornado

tornadoestornadicwedge tornado
While witnessing a tornado is the single biggest objective for most chasers, many chase thunderstorms and delight in viewing cumulonimbus and related cloud structures, watching a barrage of hail and lightning, and seeing what skyscapes unfold.
The program was called Skywarn, and the spotters were local sheriff's deputies, state troopers, firefighters, ambulance drivers, amateur radio operators, civil defense (now emergency management) spotters, storm chasers, and ordinary citizens.

2013 El Reno tornado

El Reno tornadoMay 31, 2013EF3 tornado
On 31 May 2013, an extreme event led to the first known chaser deaths inflicted directly by weather when the widest tornado ever recorded struck near El Reno, Oklahoma.
The tornado killed four storm chasers, the first known deaths in the history of storm chasing.

Dixie Alley

Only a handful of chasers decide to chase Dixie Alley, an area of the Southern United States in which trees and road networks heavily obscure the often large tornadoes.
The Dixie Alley tornadoes accompanying the HP supercells are often partially or fully wrapped in rain visually impairing the tornadoes to storm spotters and chasers, law enforcement, and the public.

Thunderstorm

thunderstormssevere thunderstormelectrical storm
While witnessing a tornado is the single biggest objective for most chasers, many chase thunderstorms and delight in viewing cumulonimbus and related cloud structures, watching a barrage of hail and lightning, and seeing what skyscapes unfold.
Every spring, storm chasers head to the Great Plains of the United States and the Canadian Prairies to explore the scientific aspects of storms and tornadoes through use of videotaping.

Severe weather

severesevere weather warningsevere-weather
Storm chasing is broadly defined as the pursuit of any severe weather condition, regardless of motive, which can be curiosity, adventure, scientific investigation, or for news or media coverage.

Spotter Network

Since 2006 a growing number of chasers are using Spotter Network (SN), which uses GPS data to plot real time position of participating spotters and chasers, and allows observers to report significant weather as well as GIS layering for navigation maps, weather products, and the like.
The Spotter Network (SN) is a system that utilizes storm spotter and chaser reports of location and severe weather in a centralized framework for use by coordinators such as emergency managers, Skywarn and related spotter organizations, and the National Weather Service.

Glossary of tornado terms

significantintensestorm chaser slang
In the area with the most consistent significant tornado activity, the Southern Plains, the tornado season is intense but is relatively brief whereas central to northern and eastern areas experience less intense and consistent activity that is diffused over a longer span of the year.

National Severe Storms Laboratory

NSSLNational Severe Storms Lab
In 1972 the University of Oklahoma (OU) in cooperation with the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) began the Tornado Intercept Project, with the first outing taking place on 19 April of that year.

GRLevelX

GRLevel3
GRLevel3 utilized both free and subscription based raw radar files, displaying the data in a true vector format with GIS layering abilities.
Its usage base grew to include many television weathercasters, including by The Weather Channel severe storms expert Greg Forbes, as well as storm chasers, storm spotters, emergency managers, weather enthusiasts, private sector meteorologists, and is often used within the NWS, itself.

Skywarn

spotterstorm spotters
More commonly, many chasers are also ham radio operators and use the 2 meters VHF and, less often, 70 cm UHF bands to communicate between vehicles or with Skywarn / Canwarn spotter networks.
Reports from spotters and chasers are given to the National Weather Service so that they have ground truth information to warn the general public.

Lightning detection

lightning detectorlightninglightning detection equipment
The first personal lightning detection and mapping devices also became available and the first online radar data was offered by private corporations or, at first with delays, with free services.

Into the Storm (2014 film)

Into the StormInto the Storm'' (2014 film)Into the Storm'' (2014)
Elsewhere, Pete, a veteran storm chaser, has been attempting to intercept and film tornadoes using a Tornado Intercept Vehicle nicknamed Titus, but has come up short all year long.

Charles A. Doswell III

Chuck DoswellDoswellCharles A. Doswell
Veteran storm chasers Chuck Doswell and Roger Edwards deemed reckless storm chasers as "yahoos".
Doswell was an early storm chaser; in fact, among the first scientific storm chasers, and still actively chases recreationally.

Heavy Weather (Sterling novel)

Heavy WeatherHeavy Weather'' (Sterling novel)
Heavy Weather is a science fiction novel by Bruce Sterling, first published in 1994, about a group of storm chasers in a world where global warming has produced incredibly destructive weather.