Strabo

StrabonStrab.Strabo the geographerStrb.
Strabo (Στράβων Strábōn; 64 or 63 BC – c. undefined AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor during the transitional period of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.wikipedia
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Amasya

District of AmasyaAmaseiaAmasia
Strabo was born to an affluent family from Amaseia in Pontus (in present-day Turkey) in around 64BC.
It was the home of the geographer Strabo and the birthplace of the 15th century scholar and physician Amirdovlat Amasiatsi.

Historian

Objective historianhistoriansamateur historian
undefined AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor during the transitional period of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.
Strabo was an important exponent of the Greco-Roman tradition of combining geography with history, presenting a descriptive history of peoples and places known to his era.

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
undefined AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor during the transitional period of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.
During the reign of Augustus, a "global map of the known world" was displayed for the first time in public at Rome, coinciding with the composition of the most comprehensive work on political geography that survives from antiquity, the Geography of the Pontic Greek writer Strabo.

Pontus (region)

Pontusancient PontusPontos
Strabo was born to an affluent family from Amaseia in Pontus (in present-day Turkey) in around 64BC.
g. by Herodotus and Strabo).

Tigranes the Great

Tigranes IITigranesTigranes II of Armenia
Strabo wrote that "great promises were made in exchange for these services", and as Persian culture endured in Amasia even after Mithridates and Tigranes were defeated, scholars have speculated about how the family's support for Rome might have affected their position in the local community, and whether they might have been granted Roman citizenship as a reward.
After the death of King Tigranes I in 95 BC, Tigranes bought his freedom, according to Strabo, by handing over "seventy valleys" in Atropatene to the Parthians.

Rome

Rome, ItalyRomanRoma
He journeyed to Egypt and Kush, as far west as coastal Tuscany and as far south as Ethiopia in addition to his travels in Asia Minor and the time he spent in Rome.
In addition, Strabo mentions an older story, that the city was an Arcadian colony founded by Evander.

Philae

Philae templePhilæTemple of Philae
Around 25 BC, he sailed up the Nile until reaching Philae, after which point there is little record of his proceedings until AD 17.
Philae is mentioned by numerous ancient writers, including Strabo, Diodorus Siculus, Ptolemy, Seneca, Pliny the Elder.

Mauretania

Kingdom of MauretaniaMauritaniaAfrican coast
The latest passage to which a date can be assigned is his reference to the death in AD 23 of Juba II, king of Maurousia (Mauretania), who is said to have died "just recently".
In the early 1st century Strabo recorded Mauri as the native name.

Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
undefined AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor during the transitional period of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.
With Octavian's victory at Actium in 31 BC, Rome began to become a major centre of Greek literature, as important Greek authors such as Strabo and Dionysius of Halicarnassus came to Rome.

Geography

geographicalgeographicgeographer
undefined AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor during the transitional period of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.

Gyaros

GyarusGyara
In 29 BC, on his way to Corinth (where Augustus was at the time), he visited the island of Gyaros in the Aegean Sea.
In 29 BC, the historian and geographer Strabo had an extended stay on the island, on his way to Corinth.

Geographica

GeographyGeographikaStrabo
As such, Geographica provides a valuable source of information on the ancient world, especially when this information is corroborated by other sources.
The Geographica (Ancient Greek: Γεωγραφικά Geōgraphiká), or Geography, is an encyclopedia of geographical knowledge, consisting of 17 'books', written in Greek by Strabo, an educated citizen of the Roman Empire of Greek descent.

Rhodes

RhodianRhodiansRodi
Aristodemus was the head of two schools of rhetoric and grammar, one in Nysa and one in Rhodes, the former of the two cities possessing a distinct intellectual curiosity of Homeric literature and the interpretation of epics.
Its regular plan was, according to Strabo, superintended by the Athenian architect Hippodamus.

Sultanhisar

District of SultanhisarSultanhisar, Aydın
His first chapter of education took place in Nysa (modern Sultanhisar, Turkey) under the master of rhetoric Aristodemus, who had formerly taught the sons of the very same Roman general who had taken over Pontus.
The first settlement here was the ancient city of Nysa in Asia (on the Maeander), founded in the Hellenistic period and continuing to thrive under the Ancient Romans, also as bishopric, where the geographer Strabo was educated.

Kingdom of Kush

KushKushiteKushites
He journeyed to Egypt and Kush, as far west as coastal Tuscany and as far south as Ethiopia in addition to his travels in Asia Minor and the time he spent in Rome.
Strabo describes a war with the Romans in the 1st century BC.

Tiberius

Tiberius CaesarEmperor TiberiusTiberius Claudius Nero
It is not known precisely when Strabo's Geography was written, though comments within the work itself place the finished version within the reign of Emperor Tiberius.
Fragmentary evidence also remains from Pliny the Elder, Strabo and Seneca the Elder.

Hipparchus

HipparchosHipparchus of NicaeaHipparchus of Nicea
Although Strabo cited the antique Greek astronomers Eratosthenes and Hipparchus, acknowledging their astronomical and mathematical efforts towards geography, he claimed that a descriptive approach was more practical, such that his works were designed for statesmen who were more anthropologically than numerically concerned with the character of countries and regions.
Most of what is known about Hipparchus comes from Strabo's Geography and Pliny's Natural History in the 1st century; Ptolemy's 2nd-century Almagest; and additional references to him in the 4th century by Pappus and Theon of Alexandria in their commentaries on the Almagest.

Nysa on the Maeander

NysaNyssaNisa
His first chapter of education took place in Nysa (modern Sultanhisar, Turkey) under the master of rhetoric Aristodemus, who had formerly taught the sons of the very same Roman general who had taken over Pontus.
Nysa appears to have been distinguished for its cultivation of literature, for Strabo mentions several eminent philosophers and rhetoricians; and the geographer himself, when a youth, attended the lectures of Aristodemus, a disciple of Panaetius and grandson of the famous Posidonius, whose influence is manifest in Strabo's Geography]; another Aristodemus of Nysa, a cousin of the former, had been the instructor of Pompey.

Isaac Casaubon

CasaubonCasaubonianaIsaac Causabon
Isaac Casaubon, classical scholar and editor of Greek texts, provided the first critical edition in 1587.
He debuted as an editor with a complete edition of Strabo (1587), of which he was so ashamed afterwards that he apologized to Scaliger for it.

Athenodorus Cananites

Athenodoros CananitesAthenodorus
The final noteworthy mentor to Strabo was Athenodorus Cananites, a philosopher who had spent his life since 44 BC in Rome forging relationships with the Roman elite.
He was a personal friend of Strabo, from whom we derive some knowledge of his life.

Xenarchus of Seleucia

Xenarchus
At around the age of 21, Strabo moved to Rome, where he studied philosophy with the Peripatetic Xenarchus, a highly respected tutor in Augustus's court.
Xenarchus left home early, and devoted himself to the profession of teaching, first at Alexandria, afterwards at Athens, and last at Rome, where he enjoyed the friendship of Arius, and afterwards of Augustus; and he was still living, in old age and honour, when Strabo wrote.

Herodotus

HerodotosHerodotus of HalicarnassusHerod.
Other historians, such as Herodotus, Aristotle, and Flavius Josephus, mentioned similar creatures.
Many scholars, ancient and modern, routinely cite Herodotus (e.g., Aubin, A. H. L. Heeren, Davidson, Cheikh Anta Diop, Poe, Welsby, Celenko, Volney, Pierre Montet, Bernal, Jackson, DuBois, Strabo).

Eratosthenes

Eratosthenes of Cyrenea seminal experimentEratosthenes of Alexandria
Although Strabo cited the antique Greek astronomers Eratosthenes and Hipparchus, acknowledging their astronomical and mathematical efforts towards geography, he claimed that a descriptive approach was more practical, such that his works were designed for statesmen who were more anthropologically than numerically concerned with the character of countries and regions.

Tyrannion of Amisus

Tyrannion
In Rome, he also learned grammar under the rich and famous scholar Tyrannion of Amisus.
Strabo speaks of having received instruction from Tyrannion.

Typhon

TyphoeusTyphaonArima, couch of Typhoeus
"... There are no trees here, but only the vineyards where they produce the Katakekaumene wines which are by no means inferior from any of the wines famous for their quality. The soil is covered with ashes, and black in color as if the mountainous and rocky country was made up of fires. Some assume that these ashes were the result of thunderbolts and sub-terranean explosions, and do not doubt that the legendary story of Typhon takes place in this region. Ksanthos adds that the king of this region was a man called Arimus. However, it is not reasonable to accept that the whole country was burned down at a time as a result of such an event rather than as a result of a fire bursting from underground whose source has now died out. Three pits are called "Physas" and separated by forty stadia from each other. Above these pits, there are hills formed by the hot masses burst out from the ground as estimated by a logical reasoning.
The geographer Strabo (c.