A report on Stralsund

Rügen Bridge, Germany's largest bridge, connects Stralsund with Rügen Island
Stralsund: Alter Markt Square with the city hall and the St. Nicholas Church
Stralsund seen from Altefähr
View over Stralsund from the tower of St Mary's
Typical street view of Stralsund: patrician houses with high gables from different eras, including the remarkable Brick Gothic and Renaissance
Portal of the St. Nicholas Church
Alter Markt Square
The city hall
gallery
cellar vaults
Old Port with Ozeaneum, warehouses and historical ships including the Gorch Fock
University of Applied Sciences Stralsund, Department of Economics
Adolf Heinrich von Arnim-Boitzenburg, pre-1868
Angela Merkel, 2019
Harmann Burmeister, ca.1885
Heinrich Kruse, 1890
St. Mary's Church
Stralsund
St. Nicolas Church
Founding document from 1234

City in the Pomeranian part of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.

- Stralsund

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Overall

Mönchgut lagoon countryside

Rügen

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Germany's largest island.

Germany's largest island.

Mönchgut lagoon countryside
Cape Arkona
Jasmund National Park, famous for its chalk cliffs, the symbol of Rügen: Victoria-Sicht (Victoria's View) and Königsstuhl (King's Chair) from the Baltic Sea
Binz
German Romantic painter Caspar Friedrich's Chalk Cliffs on Rügen
One of many megalith sites on Rügen: the Lancken-Granitz dolmen
The Celebration of Svetovid on Rügen (1912), Alphonse Mucha, The Slav Epic
Invasion of Rügen by Brandenburg-Prussia at Neukamp in 1678 (etching by Jan Luiken).
1608 map by Eilhardus Lubinus
Ralswiek Castle
KdF Building Prora
Binz, one of several spas on Rügen, featuring the typical Resort architecture of the German Baltic Sea — Kurhaus (spa hotel) at night
The pier of Sellin at night
Sellin Architecture
Rasender Roland ("Rushing Roland") is Rügen's famous historical steam-powered railway, that runs from Putbus to Binz, Baabe, Sellin and Göhren.
Typical avenue on Rügen. The German Avenue Road starts in Sellin on the island and leads down to the far South of Germany (until Lake Constance).
Ferry port Mukran, (part of Sassnitz)
Runway of Rügen Airport at Bergen
Karl Schwarz, 1865
Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher around 1815

The "gateway" to Rügen island is the Hanseatic city of Stralsund, where it is linked to the mainland by road and railway via the Rügen Bridge and Causeway, two routes crossing the two-kilometre-wide Strelasund, a sound of the Baltic Sea.

Greifswald

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City in northeastern Germany.

City in northeastern Germany.

City hall and St. Nikolai cathedral at the central market square of Greifswald.
Medieval Fangenturm (Prisoners' Tower), Greifswald
Eldena Abbey was founded in 1199. Today only its ruins remain.
The eastern side of the historic city centre (seen from the cathedral tower)
Bay of Greifswald
Greifswald's lively market square (Marktplatz)
Caspar David Friedrich (1774–1840) depicted his hometown in several paintings; this is Wiesen bei Greifswald (Meadows near Greifswald), 1820.
Woman at the 'fishers well', by Jo Jastram in the 20th century
The energy sector is important to the city's economy. Even the church in the Wieck district of Greifswald has solar panels on its roof.
Shops on the High Street (or Main Street): Greifswald is a shopping destination for the entire region.
Flag of Greifswald
University of Greifswald.
The city's public library.
Theater Vorpommern (Theater of Hither Pomerania)
Pommersches Landesmuseum (Pomeranian State Museum)
Tower of St.-Nikolai
St.-Jacobi-Kirche
Synagogue memorial plaque
Greifswald is crossed by the Ryck river that flows into the Bay of Greifswald.
Caspar David Friedrich (painted by Gerhard von Kügelgen, c. 1810–20)
Edmund Hoefer, 1865
Max Lenz, 1897
Doris Gercke, 2007
Luise Amtsberg, 2013

Together with Stralsund, Greifswald forms one of four urban centers of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

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State in the north-east of Germany.

State in the north-east of Germany.

One of more than 1000 megalith sites in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, the Lancken-Granitz dolmen
Slavic ring fortress at Cape Arkona, Rügen Island
Late medieval Brick Gothic architecture in Stralsund, nowadays a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Flag of the State of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania
Division of Pomerania
Rostock was the major overseas port of East Germany, and is one of the most important Baltic Sea ports today. Pictured is Hanse Sail, one of the world's largest maritime events.
Schwerin, the state capital of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
The central market square of Greifswald (Marktplatz), showing typical architecture of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
The Mecklenburg State Theatre in Schwerin
The Ozeaneum in Stralsund, Europe's museum of the year 2010 and Northern Germany's most popular museum (as part of the German Oceanographic Museum)
Low German dialects
The University of Rostock
The University of Greifswald
Manuela Schwesig, Minister-President since 2017
The Schwerin Palace, seat of the Landtag of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, is one of more than 2,000 palaces and castles in the state.
Airports in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania
Angela Merkel's constituency is in Western Pomerania.
Mecklenburg Lakeland, Röbel
Sellin on the island of Rügen
Moonrise over Nationalpark Müritz
V2 rocket replica in Peenemünde. These rockets were the first man-made objects to reach space.
Stralsund − aerial view of an old town, protected by UNESCO
Binz − typical German resort architecture (Bäderarchitektur) at the Baltic Sea
Beach Promenade of Warnemünde, part of Rostock
Rostock − Shopping street
Rostock − Brick Gothic gable house
Greifswald − Gable houses at market square
Schwerin − capital of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Harbour of Wismar, a historical Hanseatic city sharing its World Heritage Site status with Stralsund
Grabow − Half timbered town hall
Neubrandenburg − Concert Church St. Marien
Usedom − Benz windmill, one of many windmills in MV
Rügen − Ralswiek castle, one of many castles in MV
Rügen − Granitz Hunting Castle near Binz
Ahlbeck − Hotel "Ahlbecker Hof" (Usedom Island)
Ahrenshoop − steep coast, peninsula of Fischland-Darß-Zingst
Rügen Island − Jasmund National Park
Hiddensee Island − Dornbusch Lighthouse
Müritz Lake − near Röbel
Schwerin, the state capital of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Rostock, the largest city in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Other major cities include Neubrandenburg, Stralsund, Greifswald, Wismar and Güstrow.

Swedish Pomerania

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Dominion under the Swedish Crown from 1630 to 1815, situated on what is now the Baltic coast of Germany and Poland.

Dominion under the Swedish Crown from 1630 to 1815, situated on what is now the Baltic coast of Germany and Poland.

Swedish Pomerania (orange) within the Swedish Empire in 1658
Gustav II Adolf
Swedish Pomerania (orange) within the Swedish Empire in 1658
The former Duchy of Pomerania (center) partitioned between the Swedish Empire and Brandenburg after the Treaty of Stettin (1653). Swedish Pomerania ("West Pomerania") is indicated in blue, Brandenburgian Pomerania ("East Pomerania") is shown in orange.
Swedish Pomerania (centre-right) in 1812
Johann Joachim Spalding, 1800
portrait of Caspar David Friedrich, c.1810
Philipp Otto Runge
Kurt Christoph Graf von Schwerin
Lord Macleod

The largest cities in Swedish Pomerania were Stralsund, Greifswald and, until 1720, Stettin (now Szczecin).

Current (grey lines) and historical (coloured areas) administrative division of Vorpommern. Historically, the Oder formed the eastern border of Western Pomerania

Western Pomerania

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Western extremity of the historic region of Pomerania forming the southern coast of the Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania's boundaries have changed through the centuries as it belonged to various countries such as Poland, the Duchy of Pomerania (later part of the Holy Roman Empire), Sweden, Denmark, as well as Prussia which incorporated it as the Province of Pomerania.

Western extremity of the historic region of Pomerania forming the southern coast of the Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania's boundaries have changed through the centuries as it belonged to various countries such as Poland, the Duchy of Pomerania (later part of the Holy Roman Empire), Sweden, Denmark, as well as Prussia which incorporated it as the Province of Pomerania.

Current (grey lines) and historical (coloured areas) administrative division of Vorpommern. Historically, the Oder formed the eastern border of Western Pomerania
Coat of arms of the region
Flag of the region
Stralsund (pictured) and Greifswald form the urban center of Western Pomerania
Western Pomerania is famous for its sandy beaches along the Baltic Sea, its islands such as Rügen, Usedom and Hiddensee – and the many lagoons, part of them protected in the Western Pomerania Lagoon Area National Park. The photo shows the steep coast at Darss West Beach, near Ahrenshoop.
Slavic cult site Jaromarsburg at Cape Arkona, island of Rügen.
Coat of arms of Duchy of Pomerania, during the reign of Bogislaw X
The former Duchy of Pomerania (center) partitioned between the Swedish Empire and Brandenburg after the Treaty of Stettin (1653). Swedish Pomerania (Western Pomerania) is indicated in light blue, Brandenburgian Pomerania (East Pomerania) is shown in orange.

Its majority forms part of Germany and has been divided between the states of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and Brandenburg, with the cities of Stralsund (Strzałów) and Greifswald (Gryfia), as well as towns such as Ribnitz-Damgarten (Damgarten only), Bergen auf Rügen (Rügen Island), Anklam, Wolgast (Wołogoszcz), Demmin, Pasewalk, Grimmen, Sassnitz (Rügen Island), Ueckermünde (Wkryujście), Torgelow, Barth, and Gartz (Gardziec).

Duchy of Pomerania

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Duchy in Pomerania on the southern coast of the Baltic Sea, ruled by dukes of the House of Pomerania (Griffins).

Duchy in Pomerania on the southern coast of the Baltic Sea, ruled by dukes of the House of Pomerania (Griffins).

Pomerania under the rule of the last Griffins
The Pomeranian Griffin
Poland with Pomerania during the rule of Bolesław III Wrymouth
Kammin diocese
St. Nicholas, Wolin
Cathedral, Kamien Pomorski
Medieval Greifswald, a typical Ostsiedlung town. Locators set up rectangular blocs in an area resembling an oval with a central market, and organized the settlement.
The Duchy of Pomerania (yellow) in 1400, P.-Stettin and P.-Wolgast are indicated; purple: Diocese of Cammin (BM. Cammin) and the Teutonic Order state; orange: Margraviate of Brandenburg; pink: duchies of Mecklenburg
Wolgast palace, 1652
Słupsk castle
Eric of Pomerania crowned king of the Kalmar Union
Pomeranian Dukes' Castle, Szczecin
Duchy of Pomerania in 1477
Coat of Arms of the House of Pomerania at Pudagla palace, secularized former Usedom Abbey
Ducal castle in Darlowo
Barth with ducal palace in the upper left
Coin showing Bogislaw XIV, last Duke of Pomerania
The former Duchy of Pomerania (center) partitioned between the Swedish Empire and Brandenburg after the Treaty of Stettin (1653). Swedish Pomerania (West Pomerania) is indicated in blue, Brandenburgian Pomerania (East Pomerania) is shown in orange.
Location of the residence cities of the Dukes of Pomerania (blue) and Pomerelia (ocre) within the modern borders of Pomerania
Coat of Arms since Bogislaw X's reform in 1530.

The first towns were Stralsund (Principality of Rügen, 1234), Prenzlau (Uckermark, then Pomerania-Stettin, 1234), Bahn (Knights Templar, about 1234), and Stettin (1237–43), Gartz (Oder) (Pomerania-Stettin, 1240), and Loitz (by Detlev of Gadebusch, 1242).

13th century borders of the principality of Rügen

Principality of Rügen

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Danish principality, formerly a duchy, consisting of the island of Rügen and the adjacent mainland from 1168 until 1325.

Danish principality, formerly a duchy, consisting of the island of Rügen and the adjacent mainland from 1168 until 1325.

13th century borders of the principality of Rügen
Slavic stone embedded in St. Mary's walls, Bergen auf Rügen, probably the tombstone of Jaromar I
13th century borders of the principality of Rügen
Bishop Absalon topples the god Svantevit at Arkona, by Laurits Tuxen

1234 Stralsund

Szczecin

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Capital and largest city of the West Pomeranian Voivodeship in northwestern Poland.

Capital and largest city of the West Pomeranian Voivodeship in northwestern Poland.

The stone near Szczecin Cathedral commemorating the Kashubians (a Lehitic peoples), with an image of the Pomeranian Griffin
Szczecin Cathedral, built in the 14th century
Szczecin Castle, the seat of the dukes of the House of Griffin, which was founded by Duke Wartislaw I
View of the city with fortifications, 1581
The city's fortifications, as seen in 1642
Late 19th-century view of the city's riverfront
Sedina Monument (1899-1913) — Sedina was a personification of the city, symbolizing maritime trade and commerce
The city centre in 1945
View of the Old Town from the Oder river. Most of the medieval buildings in the city centre were completely destroyed during World War II. The Ducal Castle can be seen in the background
Monument to Polish Endeavor (Pomnik Czynu Polaków), dedicated to three Generations of Poles in Western Pomerania: the pre-war Poles in Szczecin, the Poles who rebuilt the city after World War II and the modern generation
Szczecin Shipyard workers' strike against the communist government authorities in Poland, August 1980
Façades in the rebuilt old town
Grumbkow's Palace
Szczecin's administrative divisions
Exposition centre "Przełomy" near the Old Town
Pasztecik szczeciński with clear borscht, a local fast food
Szczecin gingerbread
Stadium of Pogoń Szczecin during reconstruction (as of 2021)
Netto Arena
Athletics stadium
Former Niemierzyn tram depot – nowadays museum
Modern Solaris Urbino 18 buses
The S3 Expressway links Szczecin with its airport (at Goleniów) and Baltic ferry terminal (in Świnoujście), as well as with the major cities of Western Poland to the south – Gorzów Wielkopolski and Zielona Góra
Administration building of the Pomeranian Medical University
The monument of Jan Czekanowski, president of Polish Copernicus Society of Naturalists (1923–1924), at the General Władysław Anders Square
Catherine the Great was born in Szczecin
Chrobry Embankment
Szczecin City Hall
Red City Hall
The fountain of the White Eagle
Tower of the castle
The Feliks Nowowiejski Complex of Music Schools in Szczecin
Tenement house in Szczecin
Jagiellońska Street
Main Post Office building
Provincial Office building
Main police headquarters
Palace of the Pomeranian Land Owners
Joński Palace
The Old Art Gallery of Szczecin National Museum
State High School of Fine Arts
Hanza Tower
Jasne Błonia Park

During the war, Stettin had tended to side with Denmark, while Stralsund tended toward Sweden – as a whole, however, the Duchy of Pomerania tried to maintain neutrality.

Map of the Baltic Sea region

Baltic Sea

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Arm of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia, Sweden and the North and Central European Plain.

Arm of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia, Sweden and the North and Central European Plain.

Map of the Baltic Sea region
Danish Straits and southwestern Baltic Sea
Åland between Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia
Cape Arkona on the island of Rügen in Germany, was a sacred site of the Rani tribe before Christianization.
Main trading routes of the Hanseatic League (Hanse).
In 1649 the settlement of the Latvian-speaking Kursenieki spanned from Klaipėda to Gdańsk along the coast of the Baltic Sea.
The naval Battle of the Sound took place on 8 November 1658 during the Dano-Swedish War.
The burning Cap Arcona shortly after the attacks, 3 May 1945. Only 350 survived of the 4,500 prisoners who had been aboard
Baltic drainage basins (catchment area), with depth, elevation, major rivers and lakes
Curonian Spit in Kaliningrad Oblast, Russia
Regions and basins of the Baltic Sea: 
1 = Bothnian Bay
2 = Bothnian Sea
1 + 2 = Gulf of Bothnia, partly also 3 & 4
3 = Archipelago Sea
4 = Åland Sea
5 = Gulf of Finland
6 = Northern Baltic Proper
7 = Western Gotland Basin
8 = Eastern Gotland Basin
9 = Gulf of Riga
10 = Bay of Gdańsk/Gdansk Basin
11 = Bornholm Basin and Hanö Bight
12 = Arkona Basin 6–12 = Baltic Proper
13 = Kattegat, not an integral part of the Baltic Sea
14 = Belt Sea (Little Belt and Great Belt)
15 = Öresund (The Sound) 14 + 15 = Danish Straits, not an integral part of the Baltic Sea
Satellite image of the Baltic Sea in a mild winter
Traversing Baltic Sea and ice
On particularly cold winters, the coastal parts of the Baltic Sea freeze into ice thick enough to walk or ski on.
Piles of drift ice on the shore of Puhtulaid, near Virtsu, Estonia, in late April
Depths of the Baltic Sea in meters
Baltic Sea near Klaipėda (Karklė).
Skerries form an integral and typical part of many of the archipelagos of the Baltic Sea, such as these in the archipelago of Åland, Finland.
Stockholm archipelago
Aerial view of Bornholm, Denmark
Population density in the Baltic Sea catchment area
Vasilyevsky Island in Saint Petersburg, Russia
Stockholm in Sweden
Riga in Latvia
Helsinki in Finland
Gdańsk in Poland
Tallinn in Estonia
Satellite photo of the Baltic Sea surrounding Gotland, Sweden, with algae bloom (phytoplankton) swirling in the water
Pedestrian pier in Sellin, Germany
Svetlogorsk resort town in Kaliningrad Oblast, Russia
Mrzeżyno beach in Poland

Stralsund 58,000

Province of Pomerania (1815–1945)

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Province of Prussia from 1815 to 1945.

Province of Prussia from 1815 to 1945.

Pomerania (red), within the Kingdom of Prussia (White), within the German Empire (Tannish Color)
Karl August von Hardenberg
Pomerania (red), within the Kingdom of Prussia (White), within the German Empire (Tannish Color)
Narrow gauge railway "Rügensche Kleinbahn", operating since 1895
Binz, tourist resort since the 1860s
Pomeranian Coarsewool Sheep. Pomerania was the leading Prussian province in sheep breeding.
Otto von Bismarck in 1873
Dietrich Bonhoeffer
The Battle of Kolberg left 80% of the town in ruins.
Province of Pomerania in 1905
Pyritz
Districts of the Province of Pomerania (1913) with the Stralsund government region shown in Blue.
Districts of the Province of Pomerania (1939) with the Posen-West Prussia government region shown in Green.
Western part of the former province (Western Pomerania, Vorpommern, red) in modern Germany (grey)
Pomeranian part as of 1937 (orange) of the former eastern territories of Germany (dark green) now in post-war Poland
Posen-West Prussia (former Grenzmark Posen-Westpreußen) as of 1937 (orange, bulk in Pomerania since 1938) within the former German territories

The provincial capital was Stettin (now Szczecin), the Regierungsbezirk capitals were Köslin (now Koszalin), Stettin, Stralsund and Schneidemühl (now Piła), respectively.