Strategic Air Command

SACUnited States Strategic Air CommandStrategic Air Command (SAC)United States Air Force Strategic Air Command1957 SAC nuclear bunkerContinental Air ForcesContinental Air Forces (later, Strategic Air Command)Headquarters Strategic Air CommandICBMsOffutt AFB nuclear bunkers
Strategic Air Command (SAC) was both a United States Department of Defense (DoD) Specified Command and a United States Air Force (USAF) Major Command (MAJCOM), responsible for Cold War command and control of two of the three components of the U.S. military's strategic nuclear strike forces, the so-called "nuclear triad," with SAC having control of land-based strategic bomber aircraft and intercontinental ballistic missiles or ICBMs (the third leg of the triad being submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) of the U.S.wikipedia
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Fairchild Air Force Base

Fairchild AFBSpokane Air Force BaseSpokane Army Air Field
Effective at 2359L on 31 August 1947, the base was transferred to the Strategic Air Command (SAC) and assigned to the 15th Air Force (15 AF).

509th Bomb Wing

509th Bombardment Wing509 BW509th Bombardment Wing (Medium)
Furthermore, it was later determined that an attack by the 509th Composite Bomb Group during the 1947 to 1948 time frame would have required at least five to six days just to transfer custody of the bombs from United States Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sites to SAC and deploy the aircraft and weapons to forward operating bases before launching nuclear strikes.
There, the wing continued to function as an integral part of Strategic Air Command (SAC).

R.I. Bong Air Force Base

Richard I. Bong Air Force BaseBong Air Force BaseRichard Bong Air Force Base
His recommendations were to select a site north of Milwaukee where the location would be beneficial to not only the Air Defense Command, but the Strategic Air Command, which was planned to be the base tenant at the time.

McGuire Air Force Base

McGuire AFBFort Dix Army Air BaseFort Dix Army Air Field
Jurisdiction of the base was transferred to Strategic Air Command at Andrews Field, Maryland on 1 August 1947, the base remaining in inactive status.

MacDill Air Force Base

MacDill FieldMacDill AFBMacDill Air Force Base, Florida
During the 1950s and 1960s, it was a Strategic Air Command (SAC) installation for B-47 Stratojet bombers.

311th Air Division

311th Reconnaissance Wing311th Photographic Wing311th Photographic (later Reconnaissance) Wing
Units directly under SAC HQ included the 8AF and 15AF, as well as the 311th Air Division, 4th Fighter Wing, 82nd Fighter Wing, 307th Bomb Wing, and two reconnaissance units, the 311th Reconnaissance Wing and the 46th Reconnaissance Squadron.
Its last assignment was with Strategic Air Command at Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana, where it was inactivated on 1 November 1949.

North American F-82 Twin Mustang

F-82 Twin MustangNorth American P-82 Twin MustangP-82
SAC also enhanced its organic fighter escort capability by initiating replacement of its World War II vintage piston-engine F-51D Mustang and F-82E Twin Mustang fighter aircraft with F-84G Thunderjets.
In the postwar era, Strategic Air Command used the planes as a long-range escort fighter.

Mountain Home Air Force Base

Mountain Home Army Air FieldMountain Home AFBMountain Home Army Airfield
In 1953, the base was transferred to Strategic Air Command which assigned its 9th Bombardment Wing to Mountain Home.

Curtis LeMay

Curtis E. LeMayGeneral Curtis LeMayCurtis Emerson LeMay
After a "scathing" 1948 Lindbergh review of SAC operations in the air and at six SAC bases, General Kenney was removed as Commanding General on 15 October 1948 and replaced on 19 October 1948 by 8AF's commander, Lieutenant General Curtis LeMay.
He served as commander of the Strategic Air Command (SAC) from 1948 to 1957, where he presided over the transition to an all-jet aircraft force that focused on the deployment of nuclear weapons.

Republic F-84 Thunderjet

F-84 ThunderjetRepublic F-84G ThunderjetF-84G Thunderjet
SAC also enhanced its organic fighter escort capability by initiating replacement of its World War II vintage piston-engine F-51D Mustang and F-82E Twin Mustang fighter aircraft with F-84G Thunderjets. SAC's in-flight refueling mission began in July 1952 when its 31st Fighter-Escort Wing refueled sixty F-84G Thunderjets from Turner AFB, Georgia to Travis AFB, California non-stop with fuel from twenty-four KB-29P Superfortresses modified into aerial tankers.
The USAF Strategic Air Command had F-84 Thunderjets in service from 1948 through 1957.

73rd Air Division

73d Air Division73d Bombardment Wing73rd Bombardment Wing
Under the first SAC Commander in Chief, General George C. Kenney, initial units reporting to the Strategic Air Command headquarters on 21 March 1946 included the Second Air Force, the IX Troop Carrier Command and the 73d Air Division.
The 73d Bomb Wing was reassigned to the United States in December 1945, where it was assigned first to Continental Air Force's Fourth Air Force, then to Strategic Air Command (SAC) on 21 March 1946.

56th Fighter Wing

56th Special Operations Wing56th Air Commando Wing56th Tactical Fighter Wing
The 56th Fighter Wing was subsequently assigned to SAC on 1 October 1947.
As this mission became more important, the 56th was transferred from Strategic Air Command (SAC) to Continental Air Command in December 1948, and then to the newly reformed Air Defense Command (ADC) on 1 December 1950.

Vandenberg Air Force Base

Vandenberg AFBVandenbergVAFB
The Air Force transferred management responsibilities for Cooke AFB from ARDC to the Strategic Air Command (SAC) on 1 January 1958.

Strategic bomber

strategic bombersbomberstrategic
Strategic Air Command (SAC) was both a United States Department of Defense (DoD) Specified Command and a United States Air Force (USAF) Major Command (MAJCOM), responsible for Cold War command and control of two of the three components of the U.S. military's strategic nuclear strike forces, the so-called "nuclear triad," with SAC having control of land-based strategic bomber aircraft and intercontinental ballistic missiles or ICBMs (the third leg of the triad being submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) of the U.S. Navy).
During the 1950s the U.S. Strategic Air Command also briefly brought back the outdated term "medium bomber" to distinguish its Boeing B-47 Stratojets from somewhat larger contemporary Boeing B-52 Stratofortress "heavy bombers" in bombardment wings; older B-29 and B-50 heavy bombers were also redesignated as "medium" during this period.

43rd Air Mobility Operations Group

43d Bombardment Group43rd Bombardment Group43d Operations Group
Winners of this inaugural event were the 43rd Bombardment Group (unit) and, for aircrew award, a B-29 team from the 509th Bombardment Group.
In the postwar era, the 43d Bombardment Group was one of the first USAAF units assigned to the Strategic Air Command on 1 October 1946, prior to the establishment of the United States Air Force as a redesignation of the 444th Bombardment Group due to the Air Force's policy of retaining only low-numbered groups on active duty after the war.

509th Operations Group

509th Bombardment Group509th Composite Group509 Bombardment Group
Winners of this inaugural event were the 43rd Bombardment Group (unit) and, for aircrew award, a B-29 team from the 509th Bombardment Group.
Redesignated the 509th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy in 1946, the group was one of the original ten bombardment groups of Strategic Air Command.

Travis Air Force Base

Travis AFBFairfield-Suisun Air Force BaseFairfield-Suisun AFB
SAC's in-flight refueling mission began in July 1952 when its 31st Fighter-Escort Wing refueled sixty F-84G Thunderjets from Turner AFB, Georgia to Travis AFB, California non-stop with fuel from twenty-four KB-29P Superfortresses modified into aerial tankers.
In addition, the base's former Strategic Air Command Alert Facility is now a U.S. Navy complex that typically supports two transient Navy E-6B Mercury TACAMO aircraft assigned to Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron THREE (VQ-3) Detachment and normally home-based at Tinker AFB, Oklahoma.

307th Bomb Wing

307th Bombardment Wing307th Strategic Wing307th Bombardment Group
Units directly under SAC HQ included the 8AF and 15AF, as well as the 311th Air Division, 4th Fighter Wing, 82nd Fighter Wing, 307th Bomb Wing, and two reconnaissance units, the 311th Reconnaissance Wing and the 46th Reconnaissance Squadron.
It managed deployed Strategic Air Command tankers and bombers participating in combat operations in Southeast Asia until it was inactivated on 30 September 1975.

46th Reconnaissance Squadron

46th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron719th Bombardment Squadron46th
Units directly under SAC HQ included the 8AF and 15AF, as well as the 311th Air Division, 4th Fighter Wing, 82nd Fighter Wing, 307th Bomb Wing, and two reconnaissance units, the 311th Reconnaissance Wing and the 46th Reconnaissance Squadron.
It was redesignated the 46th Reconnaissance Squadron two months later, becoming one of the first long range reconnaissance units in Strategic Air Command (SAC).

Bergstrom Air Force Base

Bergstrom AFBBergstrom FieldBergstrom Army Air Field
It was declared a permanent base after World War II and was at various times assigned to the Strategic Air Command and the Tactical Air Command.

4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing

4080th Strategic Wing4080th SRWin April 1956
In an effort to concurrently enhance it reconnaissance capabilities, SAC also received several RB-57D Canberra aircraft in April 1956, with the aircraft initially based at Turner AFB, Georgia.
The 4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing is a discontinued United States Air Force (USAF) wing last assigned to the 12th Strategic Aerospace Division of Strategic Air Command (SAC) at Davis–Monthan AFB, Arizona.

Military Airlift Command

MACAir Corps Ferrying CommandMilitary Airlift
However, SAC did not operate the KB-50, WB-50 and WB-47 weather reconnaissance aircraft operated through the mid and late 1960s by the Air Weather Service, nor did SAC operate the HC-130 or MC-130 operations aircraft capable of aerial refueling helicopters that were assigned to Tactical Air Command (TAC), then Military Airlift Command (MAC), and from 1990 onward, those MC-130 aircraft operated by the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC), or any AFRES (now Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC)) or ANG tactical aerial refueling aircraft (e.g., HC-130, MC-130) operationally gained by TAC, MAC or AFSOC.
AMC also assumed control of most of the former Strategic Air Command (SAC) aerial refueling fleet that same day, to include all KC-10 Extender aircraft and most KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft, the only exceptions being those KC-135s that were transferred to U.S. Air Forces in Europe (USAFE), Pacific Air Forces (PACAF) and Air Education and Training Command (AETC).

Hunter Army Airfield

Hunter FieldHunter Air Force BaseHunter AFB
On 1 March 1949, Chatham Air Force Base, located eight miles (13 km) northwest of Savannah, was reopened by the United States Air Force Strategic Air Command.