Streptococcus pyogenes

S. pyogenesgroup A streptococcusgroup A beta-hemolytic ''StreptococcusGroup A beta-hemolytic streptococcusGroup A streptococcibeta-hemolytic streptococcigroup AGroup A (beta-hemolytic) StreptococcusGroup A Beta- hemolytic strepgroup A hemolytic ''Streptococcus
Streptococcus pyogenes is a species of Gram-positive, aerotolerant bacterium in the genus Streptococcus.wikipedia
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Group A streptococcal infection

group A streptococciGroup Ascarlet fever
Group A streptococci when grown on blood agar typically produces small zones of beta-hemolysis, a complete destruction of red blood cells.
A group A streptococcal infection is an infection with group A streptococcus (GAS).

Streptococcus

streptococcistreptococcalstreptococcal infection
Streptococcus pyogenes is a species of Gram-positive, aerotolerant bacterium in the genus Streptococcus.
Group A S. pyogenes is the causative agent in a wide range of group A streptococcal infections (GAS).

Pathogenic bacteria

bacterial infectionbacterial infectionsbacterial
It is an infrequent, but usually pathogenic, part of the skin microbiota.

Skin flora

skin microbiotacutaneous floramicrobiome
It is an infrequent, but usually pathogenic, part of the skin microbiota.

Streptococcus dysgalactiae

S. dysgalactiae
However, both Streptococcus dysgalactiae and the Streptococcus anginosus group can possess group A antigen.
However, an increasing incidence of S.dysgalactiae infections has been documented, and in some geographic regions, the rate of invasive infection has even surpassed that of Streptococcus pyogenes.

Microbiological culture

culturepure culturecultured
S. pyogenes can be cultured on fresh blood agar plates.
For example, a throat culture is taken by scraping the lining of tissue in the back of the throat and blotting the sample into a medium to be able to screen for harmful microorganisms, such as Streptococcus pyogenes, the causative agent of strep throat.

Streptococcal pharyngitis

strep throatstrepstreptococcal throat infection
Such bacteria can cause a variety of diseases such as streptococcal pharyngitis, rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, and scarlet fever.
Streptococcal pharyngitis, also known as strep throat, is an infection of the back of the throat including the tonsils caused by group A streptococcus (GAS).

Lancefield grouping

LancefieldLancefield classificationLancefield classification system
It is the predominant species harboring the Lancefield group A antigen, and is often called group A Streptococcus (GAS).

Rheumatic fever

rheumatic heart diseaseAcute rheumatic feverrheumatic
Such bacteria can cause a variety of diseases such as streptococcal pharyngitis, rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, and scarlet fever.
Rheumatic fever may occur following an infection of the throat by the bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes.

Sepsis

septicaemiablood poisoningseptic
Early recognition and treatment are critical; diagnostic failure can result in sepsis and death.
Other commonly implicated bacteria include Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella species.

Coccus

coccicoccoidspherical
Like other cocci, streptococci are round bacteria.

Exotoxin

exotoxinstoxintoxins
The best-characterized superantigens are those produced by the strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes that cause toxic shock syndrome.

Bacterial capsule

capsulecapsulesPolysaccharide encapsulated bacteria
A carbohydrate-based bacterial capsule composed of hyaluronic acid surrounds the bacterium, protecting it from phagocytosis by neutrophils.
Capsules too small to be seen with an ordinary microscope, such as the M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes, are called microcapsules.

Impetigo

impetigo contagiosaImpetigineimpetiginous lesion
pyogenes'' infections include pharyngitis (strep throat) and localized skin infection (impetigo).
It is typically due to either Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes.

Toxic shock syndrome

toxic shockStreptococcal toxic shock syndromeendotoxic shock
pyogenes'' infections may lead to streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which can be life-threatening.
TSS is typically caused by bacteria of the Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus type, though others may also be involved.

Necrotizing fasciitis

necrotising fasciitisflesh-eating bacteriaFlesh-eating disease
S. pyogenes invasion and multiplication in the fascia can lead to necrotizing fasciitis, a life-threatening condition requiring surgery.
This type of infection is usually caused by various species of Gram-positive cocci, (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and enterococci), Gram-negative rods, (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and anaerobes, (Bacteroides and Clostridium species).

Erysipelas

St. Anthony's fireChronic recurrent erysipelaserisipela
Erysipelas and cellulitis are characterized by multiplication and lateral spread of ''S.
Most cases of erysipelas are due to Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as beta-hemolytic group A streptococci), although non-group A streptococci can also be the causative agent.

Neonatal infection

infectionsbacterial infectioninfection
The bacterium is found in neonatal infections.
Other bacterial pathogens include Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Viridans streptococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Pharyngitis

throat infectionsore throatthroat infections
pyogenes'' infections include pharyngitis (strep throat) and localized skin infection (impetigo).
The most common is group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes), but others include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Bacillus anthracis, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Fusobacterium necrophorum.

Hyaluronidase

hyaluronoglucosaminidaseVitraseEC 3.2.1.35
Some bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Clostridium perfringens, produce hyaluronidase as a means of using hyaluronan as a carbon source.

CRISPR

CRISPR/Cas9CRISPR-Cas9CRISPR/Cas
The CRISPR system from this organism that is used to recognize and destroy DNA from invading viruses, stopping the infection, was appropriated in 2012 for use as a genome-editing tool that could potentially alter any piece of DNA and later RNA.
Researchers studied a simpler CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes that relies on the protein Cas9.

Toxin

toxinstoxicbiotoxin
pyogenes'' can be associated with the release of bacterial toxins.

Friedrich Fehleisen

In 1883, he became the first person to culture and collect Streptococcus pyogenes, which causes scarlet fever and other streptococcal illnesses.

Macrolide

macrolidesmacrolide antibioticmacrolide antibiotics
Certain strains have developed resistance to macrolides, tetracyclines, and clindamycin.
Azithromycin has been used to treat strep throat (Group A streptococcal (GAS) infection caused by Streptococcus pyogenes) in penicillin-sensitive patients, however macrolide-resistant strains of GAS are not uncommon.

Species

specificspecific epithetspecific name
Streptococcus pyogenes is a species of Gram-positive, aerotolerant bacterium in the genus Streptococcus.