Sub-subunit

Royal Anglian Regiment soldiers during a lull in operations in Afghanistan in 2014; their numbers and equipment correspond to a British fireteam of the period (Left to right: L110A2 LMG, L85A2 with L123A2 UGL, L85A2, L129A1).

Subordinated element below platoon level of company-sized units or sub-units which normally might not be separately identified in authorization documents by name, number, or letter.

- Sub-subunit
Royal Anglian Regiment soldiers during a lull in operations in Afghanistan in 2014; their numbers and equipment correspond to a British fireteam of the period (Left to right: L110A2 LMG, L85A2 with L123A2 UGL, L85A2, L129A1).

10 related topics

Relevance

A Wehrmacht infantry Gruppe with the MG 34 in the light machine gun role

Section (military unit)

A Wehrmacht infantry Gruppe with the MG 34 in the light machine gun role

A section is a military sub-subunit.

UN Peacekeepers in Eritrea monitoring the Eritrea-Ethiopia international border.

Patrol

Commonly a group of personnel, such as law enforcement officers, military personnel, or private security contractors that are assigned to monitor a specific geographic area.

Commonly a group of personnel, such as law enforcement officers, military personnel, or private security contractors that are assigned to monitor a specific geographic area.

UN Peacekeepers in Eritrea monitoring the Eritrea-Ethiopia international border.
U.S. Border Patrol agent monitoring the U.S.-Canada border in Montana. Many more agents are stationed at the US Mexico border to combat illegal immigration

In military tactics, a patrol is a sub-subunit or small tactical formation, sent out from a military organization by land, sea or air for the purpose of combat, reconnaissance, or a combination of both.

Royal Anglian Regiment soldiers during a lull in operations in Afghanistan in 2014; their numbers and equipment correspond to a British fireteam of the period (Left to right: L110A2 LMG, L85A2 with L123A2 UGL, L85A2, L129A1).

Fireteam

Royal Anglian Regiment soldiers during a lull in operations in Afghanistan in 2014; their numbers and equipment correspond to a British fireteam of the period (Left to right: L110A2 LMG, L85A2 with L123A2 UGL, L85A2, L129A1).
US Marines on patrol in Afghanistan, 2009; their numbers and equipment correspond to a United States Marine Corps fireteam (Left to right: M4 carbine, M16A4 rifle with M203, M16A4 rifle, M249).
An example of fire and maneuver in actual combat. Here, during the Battle of Okinawa, a US Marine on the left provides covering fire for the Marine on the right to break cover and move to a different position.

A fireteam or fire team is a small military sub-subunit of infantry designed to optimise "bounding overwatch" and "fire and movement" tactical doctrine in combat.

Badge of the Canadian Armed Forces

Canadian Army Advanced Warfare Centre

Canadian Forces training facility located at CFB Trenton, Ontario, Canada.

Canadian Forces training facility located at CFB Trenton, Ontario, Canada.

Badge of the Canadian Armed Forces

The SkyHawks Parachute Team is a sub-subunit of CAAWC, which conducts parachute demonstration and relative canopy work at airshows and special events worldwide.

Insignia of the Bundesheer

Zugsführer

Rank of the enlisted men rank group (EN group) in the Austrian Bundesheer.

Rank of the enlisted men rank group (EN group) in the Austrian Bundesheer.

Insignia of the Bundesheer

A Zugsführer might be tasked to lead a sub-subunit of 8 to 13 soldiers.

Trupp self-contained
(German fire-brigade)

Truppführer (modern)

German term for the position of a unit/troop leader.

German term for the position of a unit/troop leader.

Trupp self-contained
(German fire-brigade)

Normally one is authorized, mandated and competent to command, control, or lead (permanent or temporary) a Trupp (sub-subunit or small military team below platoon level) that – depending on the service, branch, or branch of service – normally contains two to six members.

Soviet tankers with visible insignia of Starshy leytenant during the Nazi-Soviet joint military parade in Brest-Livosk, Poland, on September 22, 1939.

Ranks and insignia of the Red Army and Navy 1935–1940

Individual rank insignia to the (Army) ground forces and (Navy) naval forces (1935–1940) were established by orders 2590 and 2591, effective from September 22, 1935.

Individual rank insignia to the (Army) ground forces and (Navy) naval forces (1935–1940) were established by orders 2590 and 2591, effective from September 22, 1935.

Soviet tankers with visible insignia of Starshy leytenant during the Nazi-Soviet joint military parade in Brest-Livosk, Poland, on September 22, 1939.

Sub-subunit leader and enlisted men OR8 to OR1

Drawings from the article "Hussars". Military Encyclopedia of Sytin

Hussar regiment

Formation of the light cavalry of the Army of the Russian Kingdom and the Russian Imperial Army of the Armed Forces of the Kingdom and the Empire.

Formation of the light cavalry of the Army of the Russian Kingdom and the Russian Imperial Army of the Armed Forces of the Kingdom and the Empire.

Drawings from the article "Hussars". Military Encyclopedia of Sytin
Russian hussar, engraved by Abraham de Bruyn
Akhtyrsky Regiment
Izium Regiment
Sumy Regiment
Elisavetgrad Regiment
Mariupol Regiment
Belarusian Regiment
Alexandrian Regiment
Pavlograd Regiment
Lubensky Regiment
Grodno Regiment
Olviopol Regiment
Irkutsk Regiment
Tashka in the Life Guards Hussar Regiment, sample from 1802 to 1825
The uniform of a serviceman of the 1st Sumy Hussar Regiment, 1812, drawing by Lev Kil
Karl Piratsky. The Headquarters Officer of the Hussar Life Guards and the Chief Officer of the Life Guards of the Grodno Hussars. 1858<ref>Illustration 306. The Headquarters Officer of the Hussar Life Guards and the Chief Officer of the Life Guards of the Grodno Hussars. December 18, 1858 // Changes in the Uniforms and Armament of the Troops of the Russian Imperial Army Since the Accession to the Throne of the Sovereign Emperor Alexander Nikolaevich (with additions): Compiled by the Imperial Command / Compiled by Alexander II (Russian Emperor), Illustrations by Peter Balashov and Karl Piratsky – Saint Petersburg: Military Printing House, 1857–1881 – Notebooks 1–111: (With Pictures No. 1–661) – 47 × 35 Centimeters</ref>
The Sergeant–Major of the Elisavetgrad Hussar Regiment with the Regimental Standard. Drawing by Lieutenant Colonel Samonov
1913. Parade to the 3rd Elisavetgrad Hussar Regiment in Peterhof

In the campaign, the subunits of the hussar regiment invariably were part of the vanguard and rearguard, hiding the movement of the main troops of the active formation, conducting reconnaissance of the enemy's actions.

K Troop, 9th U.S. Cavalry

Troop

K Troop, 9th U.S. Cavalry
12th Royal Lancers on manoeuvres

A troop is a military sub-subunit, originally a small formation of cavalry, subordinate to a squadron.

Gorget patch

Scharführer

Title or rank used in early 20th Century German military terminology.

Title or rank used in early 20th Century German military terminology.

Gorget patch
An SS-Scharführer serving in KZ Mauthausen
Shoulder strap
HJ Shoulder strap
NSFK Gorget patches
NSKK Gorget patch
SA Gorget patch
SS smock insignia

In German, Schar was one term for the smallest sub-unit, equivalent to (for example) a "troop", "squad", or "section".