Subject (grammar)

Subjects 1.1
Subjects 2
Subjects 3

Teacher, or John was run over by a car, is the person or thing about whom the statement is made, in this case John.

- Subject (grammar)

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Ergative–absolutive alignment

Some of the different types of data.

In linguistic typology, ergative–absolutive alignment is a type of morphosyntactic alignment in which the single argument ("subject") of an intransitive verb behaves like the object of a transitive verb, and differently from the agent of a transitive verb.

Transitive verb

Verb that accepts one or more objects.

A single-word verb in Spanish contains information about time (past, present, future), person and number. The process of grammatically modifying a verb to express this information is called conjugation.

Verbs that accept only two arguments, a subject and a single direct object, are monotransitive.

Predicate (grammar)

Used in one of two ways in linguistics and its subfields.

Subjects 1.1

The first defines a predicate as everything in a standard declarative sentence except the subject, and the other views it as just the main content verb or associated predicative expression of a clause.

Intransitive verb

Intransitive verb is a verb whose context does not entail a direct object.

A generative parse tree: the sentence is divided into a noun phrase (subject), and a verb phrase which includes the object. This is in contrast to structural and functional grammar which consider the subject and object as equal constituents.

The sentence can be made passive with the direct object "Mary" as the grammatical subject as follows:

Greenlandic language

Eskimo–Aleut language with about 56,000 speakers, mostly Greenlandic Inuit in Greenland.

Illustration 1: Distribution of Inuit language variants across the Arctic.
Ranges of West Greenlandic monophthongs on a vowel chart.
A bilingual sign in Nuuk showing the contrast between Danish and Kalaallisut. The sign translates to "parking forbidden for all vehicles".
The orthography and the vocabulary of the Greenlandic language is governed by Oqaasileriffik, the Greenlandic language secretariat, located in the Ilimmarfik university campus in Nuuk.
ĸ in a Greenlandic–Danish dictionary from 1926

Verbs are inflected for one of eight moods and for the number and person of its subject and object.

Sentence (linguistics)

Linguistic expression, such as the English example "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."

A generative parse tree: the sentence is divided into a noun phrase (subject), and a verb phrase which includes the object. This is in contrast to structural and functional grammar which consider the subject and object as equal constituents.

In traditional grammar, it is typically defined as a string of words that expresses a complete thought, or as a unit consisting of a subject and predicate.

Agent (grammar)

Thematic relation of the cause or initiator to an event.

The triangle of reference, from the influential book The Meaning of Meaning (1923) by C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards.

The agent is a semantic concept distinct from the subject of a sentence as well as from the topic.

Clause

Constituent that comprises a semantic predicand and a semantic predicate.

A conversation in American Sign Language

A typical clause consists of a subject and a syntactic predicate, the latter typically a verb phrase composed of a verb with any objects and other modifiers.

Phrase structure grammar

Originally introduced by Noam Chomsky as the term for grammar studied previously by Emil Post and Axel Thue .

Chomsky in 2017

The constituency relation derives from the subject-predicate division of Latin and Greek grammars that is based on term logic and reaches back to Aristotle in antiquity.

Constituent (linguistics)

Word or a group of words that function as a single unit within a hierarchical structure.

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The object of the active sentence is changed to the subject of the corresponding passive sentence: