Sudden Fear

Sudden Fear Is a 1952 American film noir thriller directed by David Miller, and starring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance in a tale about a successful woman who marries a murderous man.wikipedia
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Joan Crawford

CrawfordJoanLucille LeSueur
Sudden Fear Is a 1952 American film noir thriller directed by David Miller, and starring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance in a tale about a successful woman who marries a murderous man.
She would go on to receive Best Actress nominations for Possessed (1947) and Sudden Fear (1952).

Jack Palance

Jack Palance’sVolodymyr Palahnyuk
Sudden Fear Is a 1952 American film noir thriller directed by David Miller, and starring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance in a tale about a successful woman who marries a murderous man.
He was nominated for three Academy Awards, all for Best Actor in a Supporting Role, receiving nominations for his roles in Sudden Fear (1952) and Shane (1953), and winning the Oscar almost 40 years later for his role in City Slickers (1991).

David Miller (director)

David Miller
Sudden Fear Is a 1952 American film noir thriller directed by David Miller, and starring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance in a tale about a successful woman who marries a murderous man.
Others feel that Miller's filmic masterpiece is his 1952 Noir thriller and Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear co-starring the terrific and terrifying Jack Palance and Gloria Grahame at her most magnificent.

Gloria Grahame

He plots her murder in cahoots with Irene Neves (Gloria Grahame), an old girlfriend hiding in the wings.
She achieved her highest profile with Sudden Fear (1952), Human Desire (1953), The Big Heat (1953), and Oklahoma! (1955), but her film career began to wane soon afterwards.

Mike Connors

Michael ConnorsTouch Connors
Mike Connors as Junior Kearney
Connors is credited in his early films, such as Sudden Fear (1952), Island in the Sky (1953), Swamp Women (Swamp Diamonds), Five Guns West (1955), The Day the World Ended (1955), Shake, Rattle and Rock (1956), and Flesh and the Spur (1957) as "Touch Connors".

Bruce Bennett

Herman Brix
Bruce Bennett as Steve Kearney
Bennett appeared in many films in the 1940s and early 1950s, including Sahara (1943) with Humphrey Bogart, Mildred Pierce (1945) with Joan Crawford, Nora Prentiss (1947) with Ann Sheridan, Dark Passage (1947) with Bogart and Lauren Bacall, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) with Bogart and Walter Huston, Mystery Street (1950) with Ricardo Montalban, Sudden Fear (1952) with Joan Crawford and Gloria Grahame and Strategic Air Command (1955) with James Stewart.

Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

Best Actress – Motion Picture DramaBest Actress in a Motion Picture – DramaBest Actress
* Best Motion Picture Drama Actress: Joan Crawford

Virginia Huston

Virginia Huston as Ann Taylor
She appeared in The Racket (1951), which also starred Mitchum, and in the Joan Crawford dramas Flamingo Road (1949) and Sudden Fear (1952).

Lenore Coffee

Lenore J. Coffee
The screenplay by Lenore J. Coffee and Robert Smith was based upon the novel of the same name by Edna Sherry.
Sudden Fear (1952; writer)

Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor

Best Supporting ActorBest Actor in a Supporting RoleAcademy Award
Best Supporting Actor: Jack Palance

Academy Award for Best Actress

Best ActressBest Actress in a Leading RoleAcademy Award
Best Actress: Joan Crawford

Academy Award for Best Costume Design

Best Costume DesignBest CostumesBest Costume Design, Black-and-White
Best Costume Design, Black-and-White: Sheila O'Brien

Academy Award for Best Cinematography

Best CinematographyBest Cinematography, Black-and-WhiteBest Cinematography, Color
Best Cinematography, Black-and-White: Charles Lang

Elmer Bernstein

BernsteinE. Bernstein
After he refused to name names, pointing out that he had never attended a Communist Party meeting, he found himself composing music for movies such as Robot Monster and Cat-Women of the Moon, a step down from his earlier Sudden Fear and Saturday's Hero.

Sheila O'Brien

Best Costume Design, Black-and-White: Sheila O'Brien
She was a favourite of Joan Crawford’s, dressing her in Sudden Fear (1952, for which O’Brien received an Oscar nomination), Johnny Guitar (1954) and Female on the Beach (1955).

Charles Lang

Charles B. LangCharles Lang, Jr.
Best Cinematography, Black-and-White: Charles Lang
Sudden Fear (1952)

Film noir

noirnoir filmfilm-noir
Sudden Fear Is a 1952 American film noir thriller directed by David Miller, and starring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance in a tale about a successful woman who marries a murderous man.

Thriller film

thrillersuspensesuspense film
Sudden Fear Is a 1952 American film noir thriller directed by David Miller, and starring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance in a tale about a successful woman who marries a murderous man.

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesTimes
When the film was released, the film critic for The New York Times, A. H. Weiler, reviewed the film favorably, writing, "Joan Crawford should be credited with a truly professional performance in Sudden Fear ... The entire production has been mounted in excellent taste and, it must be pointed out, that San Francisco and Los Angeles, Bunker Hill area, in which most of the action takes place, is an excitingly photogenic area. David Miller, the director, has taken full advantage of the city's steep streets and panoramic views. And, in his climactic scenes in a darkened apartment and a chase through its precipitous dark alleys and backyards he has managed to project an authentically doom-filled atmosphere."

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
When the film was released, the film critic for The New York Times, A. H. Weiler, reviewed the film favorably, writing, "Joan Crawford should be credited with a truly professional performance in Sudden Fear ... The entire production has been mounted in excellent taste and, it must be pointed out, that San Francisco and Los Angeles, Bunker Hill area, in which most of the action takes place, is an excitingly photogenic area. David Miller, the director, has taken full advantage of the city's steep streets and panoramic views. And, in his climactic scenes in a darkened apartment and a chase through its precipitous dark alleys and backyards he has managed to project an authentically doom-filled atmosphere."

Bunker Hill, Los Angeles

Bunker HillBunker Hill District220 S. Bunker Hill Ave.
When the film was released, the film critic for The New York Times, A. H. Weiler, reviewed the film favorably, writing, "Joan Crawford should be credited with a truly professional performance in Sudden Fear ... The entire production has been mounted in excellent taste and, it must be pointed out, that San Francisco and Los Angeles, Bunker Hill area, in which most of the action takes place, is an excitingly photogenic area. David Miller, the director, has taken full advantage of the city's steep streets and panoramic views. And, in his climactic scenes in a darkened apartment and a chase through its precipitous dark alleys and backyards he has managed to project an authentically doom-filled atmosphere."

The Village Voice

Village VoiceVoice Literary Supplement2012 The Village Voice Poll
More recently, Village Voice reviewer Melissa Anderson wrote that Sudden Fear "fits into and defies different genres, its convention-scrambling partly the result of the fact that the film looks both forward and back."

The Star (1952 film)

The Star1952The Star'' (1952 film)
Crawford received her third and final Oscar nomination for this film, the one and only time she competed against arch-rival Bette Davis for Best Actress, who was nominated (for the ninth time) for The Star.

Come Back, Little Sheba (1952 film)

Come Back, Little Sheba1952 film versionCome Back Little Sheba
Neither actress won; Shirley Booth took home the prize for Come Back, Little Sheba.