Suffix

suffixesendingsuffixationdesinence-oidpostfixendings-ablederivational suffixEnding (linguistics)
In linguistics, a suffix (sometimes termed postfix) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word.wikipedia
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Affix

suffixaffixesaffixation
In linguistics, a suffix (sometimes termed postfix) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word.
They are bound morphemes by definition; prefixes and suffixes may be separable affixes.

Grammatical case

casecasescase marking
Common examples are case endings, which indicate the grammatical case of nouns or adjectives, and verb endings, which form the conjugation of verbs.
Languages such as Ancient Greek, Armenian, Assamese, most Balto-Slavic languages, Basque, most Caucasian languages, German, Icelandic, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Sanskrit, Tamil, Tibetan (one of a few tonal languages), the Turkic languages and the Uralic languages have extensive case systems, with nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and determiners all inflecting (usually by means of different suffixes) to indicate their case.

Inflection

inflectedinflectional morphologyinflectional
An inflectional suffix is sometimes called a desinence or a grammatical suffix or ending.
An inflection expresses grammatical categories with affixation (such as prefix, suffix, infix, circumfix, and transfix), apophony (as Indo-European ablaut), or other modifications.

Morphological derivation

derivationderivationalderived
Derivational suffixes can be divided into two categories: class-changing derivation and class-maintaining derivation.
Morphological derivation, in linguistics, is the process of forming a new word from an existing word, often by adding a prefix or suffix, such as un- or -ness.

Fusional language

fusionalinflected languageinflected
An inflectional suffix is sometimes called a desinence or a grammatical suffix or ending.
For example, the Spanish verb comer ("to eat") has the first-person singular preterite tense form comí ('I ate'); the single suffix -í represents both the features of first-person singular agreement and preterite tense, instead of having a separate affix for each feature.

Proto-Indo-European root

Indo-European rootrootPIE root
In Indo-European studies, a distinction is made between suffixes and endings (see Proto-Indo-European root).
Typically, a root plus a suffix forms a stem, and adding an ending forms a word.

Grammatical number

numbersingularnumbers
The plural form of a noun is usually created by adding the suffix -(e)s.

-ing

-ing'' (etymology)present participle/gerundWiktionary entry for ''-ing
-ing is a suffix used to make one of the inflected forms of English verbs.

Bound and free morphemes

bound morphemefree morphemebound
A word-final segment that is somewhere between a free morpheme, and a bound morpheme is known as a suffixoid or a semi-suffix (e.g., English -like or German -freundlich 'friendly').
English language affixes are almost exclusively prefixes or suffixes: pre- in "precaution" and -ment in "shipment".

English verbs

English-edEnglish verb
There are certain derivational suffixes that are frequently used to form verbs, such as -ate (formulate), -fy (electrify), and -ise/ize (realise/realize).

-ly

The suffix -ly in English is usually a contraction of -like, similar to the Anglo-Saxon lice and German lich.

Comparison (grammar)

superlativecomparativecomparison
Morphological comparison uses the suffixes -er (the "comparative") and -est (the "superlative").

Privative

-less
In Indo-European languages many privatives are prefixes; but they can also be suffixes, or more independent elements.

-logy

-logia-ologylogy
-logy is a suffix in the English language, used with words originally adapted from Ancient Greek ending in -λογία (-logia).

Continuous and progressive aspects

progressiveprogressive aspectcontinuous aspect
Quechua uses a specific suffix: -chka or -ykaa; which is directly attached before the conjugation suffixes.

Hungarian language

HungarianMagyarHungarian-language
Many synthetic languages—Czech, German, Finnish, Latin, Hungarian, Russian, Turkish, etc.—use many endings.
The standard language lost its diphthongs, and several postpositions transformed into suffixes, including reá "onto" (the phrase utu rea "onto the way" found in the 1055 text would later become útra).

Czech language

CzechcsCzech-language
Many synthetic languages—Czech, German, Finnish, Latin, Hungarian, Russian, Turkish, etc.—use many endings.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
In linguistics, a suffix (sometimes termed postfix) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word.

Word stem

stemstemsverb stem
In linguistics, a suffix (sometimes termed postfix) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word.

Grammatical conjugation

conjugationconjugatedconjugations
Common examples are case endings, which indicate the grammatical case of nouns or adjectives, and verb endings, which form the conjugation of verbs.

Semitic languages

SemiticSemitic languageArabian
Particularly in the study of Semitic languages, suffixes are called afformatives, as they can alter the form of the words.

Indo-European studies

Indo-EuropeanistIndo-European linguisticsIndo-European
In Indo-European studies, a distinction is made between suffixes and endings (see Proto-Indo-European root).

Syntactic category

syntactic categoriesfunctional categoriescategories
Inflection changes the grammatical properties of a word within its syntactic category

Grammatical person

personthird personfirst person