Sulfur

sulphurSbrimstonesulphurousnative sulfursulfur compoundssulphuricelemental sulfursulfuricS 2
Sulfur (in British English, sulphur) is a chemical element with the symbol S and atomic number 16.wikipedia
3,110 Related Articles

Sulfuric acid

sulphuric acidsulfuricH 2 SO 4
The greatest commercial use of the element is the production of sulfuric acid for sulfate and phosphate fertilizers, and other chemical processes.
Sulfuric acid (alternative spelling sulphuric acid), also known as vitriol, is a mineral acid composed of the elements sulfur, oxygen and hydrogen, with molecular formula H 2 SO 4.

Insecticide

insecticidesinsecticidalsystemic insecticide
The element sulfur is used in matches, insecticides, and fungicides.
These can be inorganic insecticides, which are metals and include the commonly used sulfur, and the less commonly used arsenates, copper and fluorine compounds.

Nonmetal

non-metalReactive nonmetalnon-metals
It is abundant, multivalent, and nonmetallic.
The elements generally classified as nonmetals include one element in group 1 (hydrogen); one in group 14 (carbon); two in group 15 (nitrogen and phosphorus); three in group 16 (oxygen, sulfur and selenium); most of group 17 (fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine); and all of group 18 (with the possible exception of oganesson).

Chemical element

elementelementschemical elements
Sulfur (in British English, sulphur) is a chemical element with the symbol S and atomic number 16.
Among the more common of such native elements are copper, silver, gold, carbon (as coal, graphite, or diamonds), and sulfur.

Natural gas

gasgas-firednatural-gas
Today, almost all elemental sulfur is produced as a byproduct of removing sulfur-containing contaminants from natural gas and petroleum.
The by-products of this processing include: ethane, propane, butanes, pentanes, and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons, hydrogen sulfide (which may be converted into pure sulfur), carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sometimes helium and nitrogen.

Amino acid

amino acidsresiduesresidue
Three amino acids (cysteine, cystine, and methionine) and two vitamins (biotin and thiamine) are organosulfur compounds.
They can be classified according to the core structural functional groups' locations as alpha- , beta- , gamma- or delta- amino acids; other categories relate to polarity, pH level, and side chain group type (aliphatic, acyclic, aromatic, containing hydroxyl or sulfur, etc.).

Mineral (nutrient)

mineralsdietary mineralsdietary mineral
Sulfur is an essential element for all life, but almost always in the form of organosulfur compounds or metal sulfides.
The trace elements that have a specific biochemical function in the human body are sulfur, iron, chlorine, cobalt, copper, zinc, manganese, molybdenum, iodine, and selenium.

Symbol (chemistry)

symbolchemical symbolchemical symbols
Sulfur (in British English, sulphur) is a chemical element with the symbol S and atomic number 16.

Hydrogen sulfide

hydrogen sulphideH 2 SStink damp
Hydrogen sulfide gives the characteristic odor to rotting eggs and other biological processes.
At high temperatures or in the presence of catalysts, sulfur dioxide reacts with hydrogen sulfide to form elemental sulfur and water.

Match

matchessafety matchfriction match
The element sulfur is used in matches, insecticides, and fungicides.
A note in the text Cho Keng Lu, written in 1366, describes a sulfur match, small sticks of pinewood impregnated with sulfur, used in China by "impoverished court ladies" in AD 577 during the conquest of Northern Qi.

Cysteine

CysL-cysteinecystein
Three amino acids (cysteine, cystine, and methionine) and two vitamins (biotin and thiamine) are organosulfur compounds.
Cysteine has the same structure as serine, but with one of its oxygen atoms replaced by sulfur; replacing it with selenium gives selenocysteine.

Fungicide

fungicidesantifungalfungicidal
The element sulfur is used in matches, insecticides, and fungicides.
A very common active ingredient is sulfur, present at 0.08% in weaker concentrates, and as high as 0.5% for more potent fungicides.

Methionine

Metmethionine metabolismL-methionine
Three amino acids (cysteine, cystine, and methionine) and two vitamins (biotin and thiamine) are organosulfur compounds.
Together with cysteine, methionine is one of two sulfur-containing proteinogenic amino acids.

Fertilizer

fertiliserfertilizersnitrogen fertilizer
The greatest commercial use of the element is the production of sulfuric acid for sulfate and phosphate fertilizers, and other chemical processes.
The global primary uses for both sulfur and phosphorus compounds relate to this basic process.

Sulfur dioxide

sulphur dioxideSO 2 SO2
Sulfur burns with a blue flame with formation of sulfur dioxide, which has a suffocating and irritating odor.
Sulfur dioxide is the product of the burning of sulfur or of burning materials that contain sulfur:

Petroleum

crude oiloilcrude
Today, almost all elemental sulfur is produced as a byproduct of removing sulfur-containing contaminants from natural gas and petroleum.
The hydrocarbons in crude oil are mostly alkanes, cycloalkanes and various aromatic hydrocarbons, while the other organic compounds contain nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur, and trace amounts of metals such as iron, nickel, copper and vanadium.

Carbon disulfide

carbon disulphideCS 2 carbon bisulphide
Sulfur is insoluble in water but soluble in carbon disulfide and, to a lesser extent, in other nonpolar organic solvents, such as benzene and toluene.
CS 2 once was manufactured by combining carbon (or coke) and sulfur at high temperatures.

Sicily

SicilianSiciliaSicilians
Historically, Sicily was a major source of sulfur in the Industrial Revolution.
In the southeast lie the lower Hyblaean Mountains, 1000 m. The mines of the Enna and Caltanissetta districts were part of a leading sulphur-producing area throughout the 19th century, but have declined since the 1950s.

Io (moon)

IoAtmosphere of IoIo torus
The distinctive colors of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io are attributed to various forms of molten, solid, and gaseous sulfur.
Several volcanoes produce plumes of sulfur and sulfur dioxide that climb as high as 500 km above the surface.

Abundance of the chemical elements

abundanceabundancesabundant
It is abundant, multivalent, and nonmetallic.
In bulk, by mass, it is composed mostly of iron (32.1%), oxygen (30.1%), silicon (15.1%), magnesium (13.9%), sulfur (2.9%), nickel (1.8%), calcium (1.5%), and aluminium (1.4%); with the remaining 1.2% consisting of trace amounts of other elements.

Iridium

IrIr-192Ir(III)
Sulfur reacts with nearly all other elements with the exception of the noble gases, even with the notoriously unreactive metal iridium (yielding iridium disulfide).
Iridium also reacts directly with sulfur at atmospheric pressure to yield iridium disulfide.

Sphalerite

zinc blendezincblendeblende
Common naturally occurring sulfur compounds include the sulfide minerals, such as pyrite (iron sulfide), cinnabar (mercury sulfide), galena (lead sulfide), sphalerite (zinc sulfide), and stibnite (antimony sulfide); and the sulfate minerals, such as gypsum (calcium sulfate), alunite (potassium aluminium sulfate), and barite (barium sulfate).
Sphalerite ((Zn, Fe)S) is a mineral that is the chief ore of zinc.

Chlorine

Clchlorine gaschlorinated
The fourth and sixth ionization energies are 4556 and 8495.8 kJ/mol, the magnitude of the figures caused by electron transfer between orbitals; these states are only stable with strong oxidants such as fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine.
The most stable chlorine radioisotope is 36 Cl. The primary decay mode of isotopes lighter than 35 Cl is electron capture to isotopes of sulfur; that of isotopes heavier than 37 Cl is beta decay to isotopes of argon; and 36 Cl may decay by either mode to stable 36 S or 36 Ar.

Nutrient

nutrientsessential nutrientmacronutrient
Sulfur is one of the core chemical elements needed for biochemical functioning and is an elemental macronutrient for all living organisms.
In addition to carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur are also needed in relatively large quantities.

Carbon

Ccarbonaceouscarbon atom
The δC-13 and δS-34 of coexisting carbonate minerals and sulfides can be used to determine the pH and oxygen fugacity of the ore-bearing fluid during ore formation.
with sulfur to form carbon disulfide and with steam in the coal-gas reaction: