Sunda Kingdom

SundaKingdom of SundaPajajaranSundaneseHindu Sunda kingdomKingdom of PajajaranMaharaja Lingga BuanaHindu Sundaneseking of Pajajarankingdoms
The Sunda Kingdom (Sundanese: ; Karajaan Sunda) was a Sundanese Hindu kingdom located in the western portion of the island of Java from 669 to around 1579, covering the area of present-day Banten, Jakarta, West Java, and the western part of Central Java.wikipedia
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Banten

Banten ProvinceBantamBantam Residency
The Sunda Kingdom (Sundanese: ; Karajaan Sunda) was a Sundanese Hindu kingdom located in the western portion of the island of Java from 669 to around 1579, covering the area of present-day Banten, Jakarta, West Java, and the western part of Central Java.
After the fall of the Tarumanegara, Banten was controlled by many Hindu-Buddhist kingdoms, such as the Srivijaya Empire and the Sunda Kingdom.

Sundanese people

SundaneseSundaSundanese culture
The Sunda Kingdom (Sundanese: ; Karajaan Sunda) was a Sundanese Hindu kingdom located in the western portion of the island of Java from 669 to around 1579, covering the area of present-day Banten, Jakarta, West Java, and the western part of Central Java. Knowledge of the kingdom among Sundanese people has been kept alive through Sundanese Pantun oral tradition, the chant of poetic verses about the golden age of Sunda Pajajaran, and the legend of Prabu Siliwangi, the most popular king of Sunda.
Court cultures flourished in ancient times, for example, during the era of Sunda Kingdom, however the Sundanese appear not to have had the resources nor desire to construct large religious monuments similar to those built by Javanese in Central and East Java.

West Java

West Java ProvinceJabarSunda
The Sunda Kingdom (Sundanese: ; Karajaan Sunda) was a Sundanese Hindu kingdom located in the western portion of the island of Java from 669 to around 1579, covering the area of present-day Banten, Jakarta, West Java, and the western part of Central Java.
The Sunda Kingdom subsequently became the ruling power of the region, as recorded on the Kebon Kopi II inscription (AD 932).

Bujangga Manik

According to primary historical records, the Bujangga Manik manuscript, the eastern border of the kingdom was the Pamali River (Ci Pamali, the present day Brebes River) and the Serayu River (Ci Sarayu) in Central Java. Most account and records of the Sunda Kingdom came from manuscripts dated from a later period circa 15th to 16th century, such as Bujangga Manik, Sanghyang Siksakanda ng Karesian, Carita Parahyangan and Kidung Sunda.
The hero of the literature is Prabu (English: Prince) Jaya Pakuan alias Bujangga Manik, a Sundanese Hindu rishi, who, though a prince at the court of Pakuan Pajajaran (capital city of Sunda kingdom, which was located near present-day Bogor city in western part of Java island), preferred to live a life of a man of religion.

Kebon Kopi II inscription

Juru Pangambat inscription
The Juru Pangambat inscription dated from 854 Saka (932 CE) confirmed this. Several stone inscriptions mention the kingdom, such as Juru Pangambat, Jayabupati, Kawali, and Batutulis. According to Kebon Kopi II inscription, dated from 854 Saka (932 CE), discovered in Kebon Kopi village, Bogor, a noble which also a skilled hunter named Juru Pangambat, declared that the authority (order) is returned to the king of Sunda.
Kebonkopi II inscription or Pasir Muara inscription or Rakryan Juru Pangambat inscription is the oldest inscription that mentioned the toponymy Sunda dated from 854 Saka (932 CE), discovered in Kebon Kopi village, Bogor, near Kebon Kopi I inscription, and named as such to differ it from this older inscription dated from Tarumanagara era.

Sri Baduga Maharaja

Sri BadugaSiliwangiKing Siliwangi
By the 15th to 16th century, after the consolidation of the kingdom by Sri Baduga Maharaja, the name Sunda has shifted from a possibly eponymous toponymy, into a name that identify a kingdom and its people.
Sri Baduga Maharaja (Sundanese: ) or Sang Ratu Jayadewata (born 1401) was the great king of the Hindu Sunda kingdom in West Java, reigned 1482 to 1521 from his capital in Pakuan Pajajaran.

Batutulis inscription

BatutulisBatu Tulis
Several stone inscriptions mention the kingdom, such as Juru Pangambat, Jayabupati, Kawali, and Batutulis.
The Batutulis inscription is an ancient Sunda Kingdom inscription dated 1533, located at Batutulis village, South Bogor, West Java.

Javanese people

JavaneseJavaJavanese culture
The name is then used by the Javanese to identify their western neighbour, also rival and enemy, as mentioned in Horren inscription (c.
They also attacked the allied forces of the Portuguese and the Sunda Kingdom, establishing in the process the Sultanate of Banten.

Sunda Strait

Sunda StraitsStraits of SundaSunda
The kingdom located in the western parts of Java near Sunda Strait, corresponds to today Banten, Jakarta and west part of West Java province.
The name came from Sunda Kingdom, a kingdom ruling the west part of Java (now including West Java, Banten, and some west part of Central Java).

Majapahit

Majapahit EmpireMajapahit KingdomKing of Majapahit
This manuscript specifically the mention of Majapahit, Malacca and Demak allow us to date the writing of the story in the 15th century, probably the later part of this century, or the early 16th century at the latest. Sangrama Wijaya (Raden Wijaya), the first King of Majapahit, was the son of the Sunda king, Rakeyan Jayadharma.
Hayam Wuruk decided, probably for political reasons, to take princess Citra Rashmi (Dyah Pitaloka) of neighbouring Sunda Kingdom as his consort.

Sukabumi

SoekaboemicitySoekabumi
Another reference to the kingdom is the Jayabupati inscription which consists of 40 lines written on four pieces of stone found on the Cicatih river bank in Cibadak, Sukabumi.
Written in Kawi script, the stone tells about the prohibition of fishing activity in the nearby river by the authorities of the Sunda Kingdom.

Banten Girang

Its capital is located 10 kilometres inland southward in Banten Girang near Mount Pulosari.
In that place there is an archaeological site which estimated dated to the era of Sunda Kingdom between 932 and 1030 CE.

Bogor

BuitenzorgBogor, IndonesiaBogor, West Java
According to Kebon Kopi II inscription, dated from 854 Saka (932 CE), discovered in Kebon Kopi village, Bogor, a noble which also a skilled hunter named Juru Pangambat, declared that the authority (order) is returned to the king of Sunda.
In the Middle Ages, the city served as the capital of Sunda Kingdom (Kerajaan Sunda) and was called Pakuan Pajajaran or Dayeuh Pakuan.

Cirebon

CheribonResidency of CirebonBahasa Cirebon
With the aid of his father-in-law, King Indraprahasta, from a kingdom near present-day Cirebon, Purbasora launched his coup on the Galuh throne.
A 15th century prince from Pajajaran, Prince Walangsungsang, converted to Islam, and was appointed as the Adipati (Duke) of Cirebon with the title Cakrabumi.

Battle of Bubat

BubatBubat incidentPasunda Bubat incident
He died in the Battle of Bubat, Majapahit, in 1357, fell victim to a stratagem crafted by the Majapahit prime minister, Gajah Mada.
The Battle of Bubat also known as Pasunda Bubat is the battle between the Sundanese royal family and Majapahit army that took place in Bubat square on the northern part of Trowulan (Majapahit capital city) in 1279 Saka or 1357 CE.

Banten (town)

BantamBantenBantam (city)
Port of Sunda was highly possible refer to port of Banten instead of Kalapa.
After the collapse of the kingdom Tarumanagara following an attack by the Srivijaya empire, power in western Java fell to the Kingdom of Sunda.

Dyah Pitaloka Citraresmi

Citra RashmiDyah PitalokaPitaloka Citraresmi
The tragedy's prelude came with the intention of Hayam Wuruk, the king of Majapahit, to marry Princess Dyah Pitaloka (also known as Citraresmi), a daughter of Prabu Maharaja Lingga Buana.
Dyah Pitaloka Citraresmi or Citra Rashmi (1340–1357), was the princess of the Sunda Kingdom in Western Java.

Carita Parahyangan

Most account and records of the Sunda Kingdom came from manuscripts dated from a later period circa 15th to 16th century, such as Bujangga Manik, Sanghyang Siksakanda ng Karesian, Carita Parahyangan and Kidung Sunda.
The Carita Parahyangan tells the history of Sunda Kingdom, from the early Galuh period in the early 8th century, during the era of Wretikandayun and King Sanjaya, until the fall of Pakuan Pajajaran in the 16th century, the capital of Sunda kingdom under invasion by the Banten Sultanate assisted by the Cirebon and Demak Sultanates.

King Siliwangi

Prabu SiliwangiSiliwangiKing Sri Baduga
Knowledge of the kingdom among Sundanese people has been kept alive through Sundanese Pantun oral tradition, the chant of poetic verses about the golden age of Sunda Pajajaran, and the legend of Prabu Siliwangi, the most popular king of Sunda.
King Siliwangi or Prabu Siliwangi (Sundanese: ) was a semi-legendary great king of the Hindu Sunda kingdom prior to the coming of Islam in West Java.

Kawali

King Jayadewata moved the government seat from Kawali back to Pakuan in 1482.
Kawali was the capital of Sunda Kingdom during Galuh period, between early 14th to late 15th century.

Srivijaya

Srivijaya EmpireSriwijayaSri Vijaya
According to this source, the port of Sunda was under Srivijaya mandala domination.
According to the Chinese Song Dynasty book Zhu Fan Zhi, written around 1225 by Zhao Rugua, the two most powerful and richest kingdoms in the Southeast Asian archipelago were Srivijaya and Java (Kediri), with the western part (Sumatra, the Malay peninsula, and western Java/Sunda) under Srivijaya's rule and the eastern part was under Kediri's domination.

Kalingga Kingdom

KalinggaHo-Ling
Since the crown prince of Galuh was the son-in-law of Queen Shima of Kalingga, a Hindu kingdom in central Java, Wretikandayun, supported by Kalingga, demanded that the remnant of what was known as Tarumanagara's territory be divided into two kingdoms.
According to Carita Parahyangan, a book composed in later period, Shima's great-grandson is Sanjaya, who is the king of Sunda Kingdom and Galuh Kingdom, and also the founder of Medang Kingdom.

Jakarta

Jakarta, IndonesiaBataviaDKI Jakarta
The Sunda Kingdom (Sundanese: ; Karajaan Sunda) was a Sundanese Hindu kingdom located in the western portion of the island of Java from 669 to around 1579, covering the area of present-day Banten, Jakarta, West Java, and the western part of Central Java.
Established in the fourth century as Sunda Kelapa, the city became an important trading port for the Sunda Kingdom.

Raden Wijaya

KertarajasaKertarajasa JayawardhanaNararya Sangramawijaya
Sangrama Wijaya (Raden Wijaya), the first King of Majapahit, was the son of the Sunda king, Rakeyan Jayadharma.
Rakeyan Jayadarma was poisoned and after her husband's death, Dyah Lembu Tal returned from Sunda-Galuh Kingdom to Singhasari with Raden Wijaya.

Galuh Kingdom

GaluhGaluh period
The capital of the Sunda Kingdom moved several times during its history, shifting between the Galuh (Kawali) area in the east and Pakuan Pajajaran in the west.
Galuh and the Sunda kingdom, another Sundanese kingdom, established the United Kingdom of Sunda and Galuh.