Sunday comics

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The Sunday comics or Sunday strip is the comic strip section carried in most western newspapers, almost always in color.wikipedia
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Comic strip

comic stripscartoon stripcomic-strip
The Sunday comics or Sunday strip is the comic strip section carried in most western newspapers, almost always in color.
Traditionally, throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, these have been published in newspapers and magazines, with horizontal strips printed in black-and-white in daily newspapers, while Sunday newspapers offered longer sequences in special color comics sections.

Little Iodine

comic strip
Other strips offer a gag complete in a single episode, such as Little Iodine and Mutt and Jeff.
Little Iodine was an American Sunday comic strip, created by Jimmy Hatlo, which was syndicated by King Features and ran from August 15, 1943 until August 14, 1983.

Prince Valiant

ValiantArncomic strip
Some strips, such as Prince Valiant appear only on Sunday. They were read by millions and produced famous fictional characters in such strips as Flash Gordon, Little Orphan Annie, Prince Valiant, Dick Tracy and Terry and the Pirates.
It is an epic adventure that has told a continuous story during its entire history, and the full stretch of that story now totals more than 4000 Sunday strips.

The Phantom

PhantomFantomenBandar tribe
Many comic strips appear both daily and Sunday, in some cases, as with Little Orphan Annie, telling the same story daily and Sunday, in other cases, as with The Phantom, telling one story in the daily and a different story in the Sunday.
The series began with a daily newspaper strip on February 17, 1936, followed by a color Sunday strip on May 28, 1939; both are still running as of.

Little Orphan Annie

AnnieAnnie Bennettcomic strip
Many comic strips appear both daily and Sunday, in some cases, as with Little Orphan Annie, telling the same story daily and Sunday, in other cases, as with The Phantom, telling one story in the daily and a different story in the Sunday. They were read by millions and produced famous fictional characters in such strips as Flash Gordon, Little Orphan Annie, Prince Valiant, Dick Tracy and Terry and the Pirates.
Reader response was positive, and Annie began appearing as a Sunday strip in the Tribune on November 2 and as a daily strip on November 10.

Mutt and Jeff

A. MuttMutt & JeffCicero's Cat
Other strips offer a gag complete in a single episode, such as Little Iodine and Mutt and Jeff.
In 1918, Mutt and Jeff added a Sunday strip, and as success continued, Fisher became increasingly dependent on assistants to produce the work.

Buck Rogers

Buck Rogers: Planet of ZoomBuck Rogers in the 25th CenturyWilliam "Buck" Rogers
Famous full-page Sunday strips include Alley Oop, Barney Google and Snuffy Smith, Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Buck Rogers, Captain Easy, Flash Gordon, and Thimble Theatre.
On March 30, 1930, a Sunday strip joined the Buck Rogers daily strip.

Topper (comic strip)

toppertopper striptopper strips
Many of the leading cartoonists also drew an accompanying topper strip to run above or below their main strip, a practice which began to fade away during the late 1930s.
A topper in comic strip parlance is a small secondary strip seen along with a larger Sunday strip.

Alley Oop

comic strip of the same nameeponymous comic strip
Famous full-page Sunday strips include Alley Oop, Barney Google and Snuffy Smith, Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Buck Rogers, Captain Easy, Flash Gordon, and Thimble Theatre.
Oop was transported to the 20th century by an early test of the machine (in the Sunday strip of April 9, 1939).

Jimmy Swinnerton

James SwinnertonJames Guilford SwinnertonSwinnerton, James G.
Jimmy Swinnerton's The Little Bears introduced sequential art and recurring characters in William Randolph Hearst's San Francisco Examiner.
The strip had its last appearance in the Sunday comics color supplement in 1904.

Popeye

Popeye the SailorThimble TheatrePopeye the Sailor Man
Famous full-page Sunday strips include Alley Oop, Barney Google and Snuffy Smith, Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Buck Rogers, Captain Easy, Flash Gordon, and Thimble Theatre.
Sagendorf wrote and drew the daily strip until 1986, and continued to write and draw the Sunday strip until his death in 1994.

Captain Easy

Famous full-page Sunday strips include Alley Oop, Barney Google and Snuffy Smith, Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Buck Rogers, Captain Easy, Flash Gordon, and Thimble Theatre.
On July 30, 1933, Crane launched Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune as a Sunday page starring Easy.

Bob Gustafson

On the other hand, numerous strips such as Bob Gustafson's Specs and Virgil Partch's The Captain's Gig are almost completely forgotten today, other than a brief display in the Stripper's Guide site run by comics historian Allan Holtz.
In the post-World War II years he did his Sunday strip Specs for the New York Tribune Syndicate.

New York Journal-American

New York JournalNew York AmericanNew York Journal American
:It was in Joseph Pulitzer's New York World that cartoonist Richard Outcault's legendary Yellow Kid made his newspaper debut in 1895, but it was Hearst's New York Journal that cannily snatched the Kid away from the rival sheet and deployed him as a key weapon in the historic newspaper circulation wars.
The comics expanded into two full pages daily and a 12-page Sunday color section with leading King Features Syndicate strips.

Peanuts

Peanuts WorldwideSnoopyCharlie Brown/Peanuts Specials
Leading the lists of classic humor strips are Bringing Up Father, Gasoline Alley, Li'l Abner, Pogo, Peanuts and Smokey Stover.
Peanuts is a syndicated daily and Sunday American comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz that ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000, continuing in reruns afterward.

Terry and the Pirates (comic strip)

Terry and the Piratescomic stripcomic strip of the same name
They were read by millions and produced famous fictional characters in such strips as Flash Gordon, Little Orphan Annie, Prince Valiant, Dick Tracy and Terry and the Pirates.
The daily strip began October 22, 1934, and the Sunday color pages began December 9, 1934.

Gasoline Alley

Skeezixcartoon of the same namecomic strip
Leading the lists of classic humor strips are Bringing Up Father, Gasoline Alley, Li'l Abner, Pogo, Peanuts and Smokey Stover.
The strip originated on the Chicago Tribune's black-and-white Sunday page, The Rectangle, where staff artists contributed one-shot panels, continuing plots or themes.

Our Own Oddities

Some newspapers added their own local features, such as Our Own Oddities in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
Our Own Oddities is an illustrated panel that ran in the Sunday comics section of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from September 1, 1940 to February 24, 1991.

Buz Sawyer

In some cases, such as Buz Sawyer, the Sunday strip is a spin-off, focusing on different characters than the daily.
Rosco Sweeney, who is now featured on the entire Sunday page, was Buz’s wartime buddy.

Dick Tracy

comic strip1930s comic strip character of the same nameSparkle Plenty
They were read by millions and produced famous fictional characters in such strips as Flash Gordon, Little Orphan Annie, Prince Valiant, Dick Tracy and Terry and the Pirates.
At this time, the standard publication size and space of newspaper comics was sharply reduced; for example, the Dick Tracy Sunday strip, which had traditionally been a full-page episode containing 12 panels, was cut in size to a half-page format that offered, at most, eight panels—these new restrictions created challenges for all comic artists.

The World Museum

The World Museum gave readers instructions for cutting pictures apart and assembling them into a diorama, often with a subject from nature, such as The Grand Canyon or Buffalo Hunt.
The World Museum was a full-page illustrated feature in some American Sunday newspapers, starting in May 9, 1937 until January 30, 1938.

Hägar the Horrible

Hagar the HorribleHägar the Horrible: Hägar Knows BestHägar
For instance, a daily strip in The Arizona Republic measures 43⁄4" wide by 11⁄2" deep, while the three-tiered Hägar the Horrible Sunday strip in the same paper is 5" wide by 33⁄8" deep.
The strip follows a standard gag-a-day daily format with an extended color sequence on Sundays.

Comic strip formats

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The last full-page Sunday strip was Prince Valiant, which was published as a full page in some newspapers until 1971.
The first distinction in comic strips formats is between the daily comic strip and the Sunday strip.

Flash Gordon

comic strip of the same nameAnnihilantsFlash
Famous full-page Sunday strips include Alley Oop, Barney Google and Snuffy Smith, Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Buck Rogers, Captain Easy, Flash Gordon, and Thimble Theatre. They were read by millions and produced famous fictional characters in such strips as Flash Gordon, Little Orphan Annie, Prince Valiant, Dick Tracy and Terry and the Pirates.
Raymond's work, particularly his Sunday strips, has been reprinted many times over the years by many publishers, most notably Nostalgia Press, Kitchen Sink Press and Checker Book Publishing Group.

Warren Tufts

Examples such as Lance by Warren Tufts and Frank Giacoia's Johnny Reb and Billy Yank proved artistic, though not commercial, successes.
Distributed by United Feature, launching May 22, 1949, it initially appeared only in the Sunday comics, but when the story became popular, a daily strip was added.