Super Mario Bros. 2

Super Mario AdvanceSuper Mario USABS Super Mario USA Power ChallengeYume Kōjō: Doki Doki PanicDoki Doki PanicDream Factory: Heartbeat Panicgame with the same nameSuper Mario
Super Mario Bros. 2 is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo Entertainment System.wikipedia
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Fuji TV

CXFuji TelevisionBS Fuji
Not part of the Mario series, this game was cobranded with Fuji Television's media technology expo, called Yume Kōjō ("Dream Factory").
In 1986 and 1987, Fuji TV worked with Nintendo to create two games called All Night Nippon Super Mario Bros. and Yume Kojo: Doki Doki Panic for the Famicom.

Super Mario All-Stars

Super Mario All-Stars + WorldSuper Mario All-Stars 25th AnniversarySuper Mario All-Stars: 25th Anniversary Edition
The game was a commercial success, leading to its release in Japan for the Family Computer as Super Mario USA. It was re-released as part of the Super Mario All-Stars collection, as well as in the form of Super Mario Advance for the Game Boy Advance handheld system.
The game contains enhanced remakes of the four Super Mario games released for the Nintendo Entertainment System: Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 2, Super Mario Bros. 3, and Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, the last of which was the original Japanese version of Super Mario Bros. 2 which was not released outside Japan prior to this compilation.

Toad (Nintendo)

ToadToadsKinopio
Before each stage, the player chooses one of four different protagonists to use: Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Toadstool.
He is usually seen as a non-player character (NPC) who provides assistance to Mario and his friends in most games, but there are times when Toad(s) takes center stage and appears as a protagonist, as seen in Super Mario Bros. 2, Wario's Woods, Super Mario 3D World, and Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker.

Luigi

Luigi MarioBaby LuigiBrothers
Before each stage, the player chooses one of four different protagonists to use: Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Toadstool.
The first game where he was available as a primary character was Super Mario Bros. 2.

Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels

Super Mario Bros. 2Japanese ''Super Mario Bros. 2Super Mario Bros 2.
After Nintendo of America found the Japanese version of Super Mario Bros. 2 (later released internationally as Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels) to be too difficult and too similar to its predecessor for release outside of Japan, Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic was cosmetically modified to become what had essentially been the original concept of Super Mario Bros. 2.
Nintendo of America deemed the title too difficult for its North American audience and instead chose another game as the region's Super Mario Bros. 2: a retrofitted version of the Japanese Doki Doki Panic.

List of Mario franchise characters

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The objective of the game is to navigate the player's character through the dream world Subcon and defeat the main antagonist Wart.
Her first appearance was as an enemy to Mario in Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic, which was localized for English audiences as Super Mario Bros. 2.

Mario

Super MarioMario DayBaby Mario
Before each stage, the player chooses one of four different protagonists to use: Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Toadstool.
In Super Mario Bros. 2, the player can choose between Mario, Luigi, Toad, or Princess Peach.

Princess Peach

PeachPrincess Toadstoolprincess
Before each stage, the player chooses one of four different protagonists to use: Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Toadstool.
Princess Peach has long, blonde hair (except in Super Mario Bros. 2 and Super Mario Bros. 3, where she has brown hair), blue eyes, tall frame, an hourglass figure, and a rosy complexion.

Super Mario Advance

The game was a commercial success, leading to its release in Japan for the Family Computer as Super Mario USA. It was re-released as part of the Super Mario All-Stars collection, as well as in the form of Super Mario Advance for the Game Boy Advance handheld system.
Super Mario Advance, an adaptation of Super Mario Bros. 2

Kensuke Tanabe

What was to eventually become this new game had originated as a prototype, which was developed and directed by Kensuke Tanabe and implemented by Nintendo's frequent programming partner, SRD.
He directed the platform games Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic and Super Mario Bros. 2, and worked on the scripts for the action-adventures The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening.

Family Computer Disk System

Famicom Disk SystemFDSDisk System
The original prototype concept later became Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic for Family Computer Disk System. In collaboration with Shigeru Miyamoto's team, they greatly expanded the gameplay and developed Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic for the Family Computer Disk System, released in Japan on July 10, 1987.
The Western-market Super Mario Bros. 2 originated from a disk-only game called Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic.

Super Mario

MarioMushroomSuper Mario Bros.
Magic potions found in each level are used to temporarily access "Sub-space", an inverted area where the player can collect coins and Mushrooms that increase the character's maximum health. Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic needed only a few alterations for its conversion into the Mario series because it had already contained familiar features: Starmen, sound effects for coins and jumping, POW blocks, warp zones, and a soundtrack composed by original Super Mario Bros. composer Koji Kondo.
Based on a discarded prototype, the game was instead originally released as Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic in Japan, and was ultimately converted back into a Mario game for the rest of the world as Super Mario Bros. 2, before being named in Japan as Super Mario USA as part of Super Mario All-Stars.

Koji Kondo

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Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic needed only a few alterations for its conversion into the Mario series because it had already contained familiar features: Starmen, sound effects for coins and jumping, POW blocks, warp zones, and a soundtrack composed by original Super Mario Bros. composer Koji Kondo.
He also created the soundtrack to Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic (1987), which was later rebranded outside Japan as Super Mario Bros. 2 in 1988.

Nintendo Power

NesterGame of the YearNintendo Power Award
Nintendo Power listed Super Mario Bros. 2 as the eighth best Nintendo Entertainment System video game, mentioning that regardless of its predecessor not being a Mario game, it was able to stand on its own merits and its unique takes on the series' signature format.
The first issue, dated July/August 1988, spotlighted the NES game Super Mario Bros. 2.

Shigeru Miyamoto

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In collaboration with Shigeru Miyamoto's team, they greatly expanded the gameplay and developed Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic for the Family Computer Disk System, released in Japan on July 10, 1987.
They realized they already had one option in Yume Kojo: Doki Doki Panic (Dream Factory: Heart-Pounding Panic), also designed by Miyamoto.

Dream world (plot device)

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The objective of the game is to navigate the player's character through the dream world Subcon and defeat the main antagonist Wart.
The video games Link's Awakening and Super Mario Bros. 2 take place in a dream of the Wind Fish's (whom Link must wake up) and Mario's respectively.

Super Mario Bros.

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Unlike the previous game, this game does not have multiplayer functionality.
The game was published by Fuji TV, the same company which later went on to publish Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic (which was released outside of Japan as Super Mario Bros. 2). The game features graphics based upon the show, with sprites of the enemies, mushroom retainers, and other characters being changed to look like famous Japanese music idols, recording artists, and DJs as well as other people related to All-Night Nippon.

Nintendo Entertainment System

NESFamily ComputerFamicom
The game was a commercial success, leading to its release in Japan for the Family Computer as Super Mario USA. It was re-released as part of the Super Mario All-Stars collection, as well as in the form of Super Mario Advance for the Game Boy Advance handheld system. Nintendo Power listed Super Mario Bros. 2 as the eighth best Nintendo Entertainment System video game, mentioning that regardless of its predecessor not being a Mario game, it was able to stand on its own merits and its unique takes on the series' signature format. Super Mario Bros. 2 is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo Entertainment System.

Super Mario Bros. 3

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The ability appears in Super Mario Bros. 3, Donkey Kong (Game Boy), Super Mario World, Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins, Super Mario 64, Super Mario Sunshine, Mario vs. Donkey Kong, Super Mario 64 DS, New Super Mario Bros., Super Paper Mario, New Super Mario Bros. Wii, Super Mario Galaxy, Super Mario Galaxy 2, New Super Mario Bros. U, and Super Mario 3D World.
The game shares similar gameplay mechanics with previous games in the series—Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, and Super Mario Bros. 2, while introducing several new elements.

Birdo

Many characters of Super Mario Bros. 2 have been assimilated into the greater Mario universe as well, such as Birdo, Pokeys, Bob-ombs, and Shy Guys.
Her first appearance was as an enemy in Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic, which was localized for English-language audiences as Super Mario Bros. 2.

Donkey Kong (Game Boy)

Donkey Kong1994 Game Boy game of the same nameDonkey Kong'' (Game Boy)
The ability appears in Super Mario Bros. 3, Donkey Kong (Game Boy), Super Mario World, Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins, Super Mario 64, Super Mario Sunshine, Mario vs. Donkey Kong, Super Mario 64 DS, New Super Mario Bros., Super Paper Mario, New Super Mario Bros. Wii, Super Mario Galaxy, Super Mario Galaxy 2, New Super Mario Bros. U, and Super Mario 3D World.
It features gameplay elements from Donkey Kong, Donkey Kong Jr., and Super Mario Bros. 2.

Super Mario World

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The ability appears in Super Mario Bros. 3, Donkey Kong (Game Boy), Super Mario World, Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins, Super Mario 64, Super Mario Sunshine, Mario vs. Donkey Kong, Super Mario 64 DS, New Super Mario Bros., Super Paper Mario, New Super Mario Bros. Wii, Super Mario Galaxy, Super Mario Galaxy 2, New Super Mario Bros. U, and Super Mario 3D World.
The game has similar gameplay to earlier games in the Super Mario series—Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 2, and Super Mario Bros. 3—but introduces new elements.

The Super Mario Bros. Super Show!

Super Mario Bros.Super Mario Bros. Super Show!, Theanimated television series
The 1989 cartoon television series The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! incorporates characters, settings, and music from Super Mario Bros. 2.
The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! is an American television series based upon Nintendo's Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 2.

Super Mario 3D World

World
The Wii U game Super Mario 3D World features the same playable characters with the same basic physical abilities from Super Mario Bros. 2.
Similar to their appearances in Super Mario Bros. 2, each of the characters possesses unique abilities and controls differently: Mario has balanced running speed and jump height; Luigi jumps higher and falls slower, but has lower traction; Peach can jump and shortly float through the air, but runs slowly; Toad runs the fastest, but cannot jump as high and falls faster; and Rosalina can use the spin attack move as seen in the Super Mario Galaxy games, but has the slowest running speed.

St.GIGA

In March–April 1996, Nintendo collaborated with the St.GIGA satellite radio station to release an ura or gaiden version of the game for the Satellaview system, featuring 16-bit audiovisual enhancements similar to that of Super Mario All-Stars.
The broadcast content ranged from video-game-related Satellaview news and specific interest journals such as Game Tiger's big House to expansion data for popular Super Famicom games (including, for example, Chrono Trigger) and all new video game releases including titles in such flagship series as The Legend of Zelda, Super Mario, and Kirby.