Superhero

superheroessuperheroinesuper herosuper-herosuperhero teamsuperheroinessuper heroesfictional superherosuper-heroineheroes
A superhero is a heroic stock character, typically possessing supernatural or superhuman powers, who is dedicated to fighting the evil of their universe, protecting the public, and battling super-villains.wikipedia
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Superhero fiction

Superherosuperhero fantasySuperheroes
Superhero fiction is the genre of fiction that is centered on such characters, especially in American comic book and films since the 1930s.
Superhero fiction is a genre of speculative fiction examining the adventures, personalities and ethics of costumed crime fighters known as superheroes, who often possess superhuman powers and battle similarly powered criminals known as supervillains.

Batman

Bruce WayneBruce Wayne / BatmanBruce Wayne/Batman
By most phenomena to be deemed superheroes: some (for example Batman) derive their status from the technology they create and use. Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains.
Batman is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.

Superman

Kal-ElClark Kent / SupermanClark Kent
Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains. In the 1930s, both trends came together in some of the earliest superpowered costumed heroes such as Japan's Ōgon Bat (visualized in painted panels used by kamishibai oral storytellers in Japan since 1931), Mandrake the Magician (1934), Superman in 1938 and Captain Marvel (1939) at the beginning of the Golden Age of Comic Books.
Superman is a fictional superhero.

Spider-Man

Peter ParkerPeter Parker / Spider-ManPeter Parker/Spider-Man
Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains.
Spider-Man is a fictional superhero created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko.

Wonder Woman

Diana Prince / Wonder WomanDianaDiana Prince
Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains.
Wonder Woman is a fictional superheroine, appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.

Flash (Barry Allen)

Barry AllenFlashThe Flash
Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains.
Flash (Bartholomew Henry "Barry" Allen) is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.

Hero

heroineheroismwar hero
A superhero is a heroic stock character, typically possessing supernatural or superhuman powers, who is dedicated to fighting the evil of their universe, protecting the public, and battling super-villains.
Examples of heroes range from mythological figures, such as Gilgamesh, Achilles and Iphigenia, to historical figures, such as Joan of Arc, Giuseppe Garibaldi or Sophie Scholl, modern heroes like Alvin York, Audie Murphy and Chuck Yeager, and fictional superheroes, including Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, and Captain America.

Hal Jordan

Green LanternGreen Lantern (Hal Jordan)Hal Jordan / Green Lantern
Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains.
Hal Jordan, also known as Green Lantern, is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.

Captain America

Steve RogersCaptain America ComicsSteve Rogers / Captain America
Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains.
Captain America is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

X-Men

The X-MenX-ManX-People
Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains.
X-Men are a team of fictional superheroes appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

Supervillain

supervillainssupervillainesssuper-villain
A superhero is a heroic stock character, typically possessing supernatural or superhuman powers, who is dedicated to fighting the evil of their universe, protecting the public, and battling super-villains.
A supervillain is the antithesis of a superhero.

Superpower (ability)

superpowerssuperpowersuperhuman abilities
A superhero is a heroic stock character, typically possessing supernatural or superhuman powers, who is dedicated to fighting the evil of their universe, protecting the public, and battling super-villains.
They are most frequently used in pulp magazines, comic books, science fiction, television programs, and films as the key attribute of a superhero.

Secret identity

secret identitiesdual identityidentities
The 1903 play The Scarlet Pimpernel and its spinoffs popularized the idea of a masked avenger and the superhero trope of a secret identity.
The public identity being known to the general public as the "superhero persona" and the other being the secret identity.

Pulp magazine

pulp fictionpulppulp novel
Shortly afterward, masked and costumed pulp fiction characters such as Jimmie Dale/the Gray Seal (1914), Zorro (1919), Buck Rogers (1928), The Shadow (1930) Flash Gordon (1934), and comic strip heroes, such as the Phantom (1936) began appearing, as did non-costumed characters with super strength, including the comic-strip characters Patoruzú (1928) and Popeye (1929) and novelist Philip Wylie's character Hugo Danner (1930).
Modern superhero comic books are sometimes considered descendants of "hero pulps"; pulp magazines often featured illustrated novel-length stories of heroic characters, such as Flash Gordon, The Shadow, Doc Savage, and The Phantom Detective.

Zorro

Diego VegaEl ZorroZorro Productions, Inc.
Shortly afterward, masked and costumed pulp fiction characters such as Jimmie Dale/the Gray Seal (1914), Zorro (1919), Buck Rogers (1928), The Shadow (1930) Flash Gordon (1934), and comic strip heroes, such as the Phantom (1936) began appearing, as did non-costumed characters with super strength, including the comic-strip characters Patoruzú (1928) and Popeye (1929) and novelist Philip Wylie's character Hugo Danner (1930).
Being one of the earliest examples of a fictional masked avenger with a double identity, Zorro inspired the creation of several similar characters in pulp magazines and other media, and is a precursor of the superheroes of American comic books, with Batman drawing particularly close parallels to the character.

Green Lantern

The Green LanternGreen LanternsGreen Lantern (Hal Jordan)
During the 1940s there were many superheroes: The Flash, Green Lantern and Blue Beetle debuted in this era.
Green Lantern is the name of several superheroes appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.

Golden Age of Comic Books

Golden AgeGolden Age of ComicsGolden
In the 1930s, both trends came together in some of the earliest superpowered costumed heroes such as Japan's Ōgon Bat (visualized in painted panels used by kamishibai oral storytellers in Japan since 1931), Mandrake the Magician (1934), Superman in 1938 and Captain Marvel (1939) at the beginning of the Golden Age of Comic Books.
The superhero archetype was created and many well-known characters were introduced, including Superman, Batman, Captain Marvel, Captain America, and Wonder Woman.

Blue Beetle

The Blue Beetlebeetle scarabBeetles
During the 1940s there were many superheroes: The Flash, Green Lantern and Blue Beetle debuted in this era.
Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional superheroes who appear in a number of American comic books published by a variety of companies since 1939.

Mandrake the Magician

Mandrakecomic stripKing:Mandrake the Magician
In the 1930s, both trends came together in some of the earliest superpowered costumed heroes such as Japan's Ōgon Bat (visualized in painted panels used by kamishibai oral storytellers in Japan since 1931), Mandrake the Magician (1934), Superman in 1938 and Captain Marvel (1939) at the beginning of the Golden Age of Comic Books.
Mandrake, along with the Phantom Magician in Mel Graff's The Adventures of Patsy, is regarded by comics historians as the first superhero of comics, such as comics historian Don Markstein, who writes, "Some people say Mandrake the Magician, who started in 1934, was comics' first superhero."

Jack Kirby

KirbyJack "King" Kirby[Jack] Kirby
Created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, the superhero was the physical embodiment of the American spirit during World War II.
In 1940, he and writer-editor Joe Simon created the highly successful superhero character Captain America for Timely Comics, predecessor of Marvel Comics.

Hugo Danner

Sons of Dawn
Shortly afterward, masked and costumed pulp fiction characters such as Jimmie Dale/the Gray Seal (1914), Zorro (1919), Buck Rogers (1928), The Shadow (1930) Flash Gordon (1934), and comic strip heroes, such as the Phantom (1936) began appearing, as did non-costumed characters with super strength, including the comic-strip characters Patoruzú (1928) and Popeye (1929) and novelist Philip Wylie's character Hugo Danner (1930).
Born in the late 19th century with superhuman abilities via prenatal chemical experimentation, Danner tries to use his powers for good, making him a precursor of the superhero.

Joe Simon

SimonGregory SykesJim Simon
Created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, the superhero was the physical embodiment of the American spirit during World War II.
With his partner, artist Jack Kirby, he co-created Captain America, one of comics' most enduring superheroes, and the team worked extensively on such features at DC Comics as the 1940s Sandman and Sandy the Golden Boy, and co-created the Newsboy Legion, the Boy Commandos, and Manhunter.

Timely Comics

TimelyTimely PublicationsMarvel 75th Anniversary Celebration
1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics.
In 1939, with the emerging medium of comic books proving hugely popular, and the first superheroes setting the trend, pulp-magazine publisher Martin Goodman founded Timely Publications, basing it at his existing company in the McGraw-Hill Building at 330 West 42nd Street in New York City.

Marvel Comics

MarvelMarvel ComicMarvel.com
1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics.
Marvel counts among its characters such well-known superheroes as Spider-Man, Iron Man, Thor, the Hulk, Captain America, Wolverine, Black Panther, Captain Marvel, Doctor Strange, Deadpool, Ghost Rider, Blade, Daredevil and the Punisher.

Phantom Lady

Jenny KnightJenny Knight Phantom LadyJenny Knight/Phantom Lady
Notable characters include The Woman in Red, introduced in Standard Comics' Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; the comedic character Red Tornado, debuting in All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940); Miss Fury, debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug.
Phantom Lady is a fictional superheroine, one of the first such characters to debut in the 1940s Golden Age of Comic Books.