Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Supreme Executive CouncilVice-President of PennsylvaniaSupreme Executive Council of PennsylvaniaPresident of PennsylvaniaExecutive Council of PennsylvaniaPresidentVice-President1790 Pennsylvania Constitution2nd President of Pennsylvaniagovernor of Pennsylvania
The Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania comprised the executive branch of the Pennsylvania State government between 1777 and 1790.wikipedia
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Benjamin Franklin

Ben FranklinFranklinFranklin, Benjamin
The best-known member of the Council was Benjamin Franklin, who also served as its sixth president.
From 1785 to 1788, he served as [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Presidents of Council|governor of Pennsylvania]].

Thomas Wharton Jr.

Thomas WhartonThomas Wharton, Jr.Thomas
He served as the first [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Presidents of Council|President of Pennsylvania]] (an office akin to Governor) following the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain.

George Bryan

He served as the first [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Vice-Presidents of Council|Vice-President of Pennsylvania]] (analogous to Lieutenant Governor) and its second [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Presidents of Council|President]] (Governor) following the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain.

List of governors of Pennsylvania

Governor of PennsylvaniaGovernorPennsylvania Governor
Although these men may be referred to properly as Presidents of Pennsylvania their office is analogous to the modern office of governor, and they are often included in lists of those who have held the latter title.
The first Pennsylvania constitution in 1776 created the Supreme Executive Council as the state's executive branch, with the President of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as its head.

Joseph Reed (politician)

Joseph ReedAdjutant-General Joseph ReedColonel Joseph Reed
He also served as President of Pennsylvania's Supreme Executive Council, a position analogous to the modern office of Governor.

William Moore (statesman)

William Moore
He served as [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Vice-Presidents of Council|Vice-President of Pennsylvania]] from 1779 to 1781, and then as [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Presidents of Council|President]] from 1781 to 1782.

Pennsylvania Constitution of 1776

1776 ConstitutionPennsylvania ConstitutionConstitution of 1776
The 1776 Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania was framed by a constitutional convention called at the urging of the Continental Congress.

Thomas Mifflin

first governor of Pennsylvania, Thomas Mifflin.General MifflinGeorge Mifflin House
He served as Speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives from 1785 to 1787, then as [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Presidents of Council|President]] of the Pennsylvania Supreme Executive Council from 1788 to 1790.

James Potter (Pennsylvania politician)

James PotterGeneral James PotterCol. James Potter
He rose to the rank of brigadier general of Pennsylvania militia during the Revolutionary War, and served as [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Vice-Presidents of Council|Vice-President]] of Pennsylvania, 1781–1782.

Chester County, Pennsylvania

Chester CountyChesterChester Counties
These eleven counties were Philadelphia (at that time a governmental entity distinct from the City of Philadelphia), Chester, Bucks, Lancaster, York, Cumberland, Berks, Northampton, Bedford, Northumberland, and Westmoreland.

David Redick

David Jermah Redick (5 July 1753 – 28 September 1805) was a Pennsylvania surveyor, lawyer, politician, and the 9th [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Vice-Presidents of Council|Vice-President of Pennsylvania]].

James Ewing (Pennsylvania)

James Ewing
He served in the Pennsylvania General Assembly and also as [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Vice-Presidents of Council|Vice-President of Pennsylvania]], a position comparable to that of Lieutenant Governor.

James Irvine (Pennsylvania)

James Irvine
He was an officer of the Continental Army, a member of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, and [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Vice-Presidents of Council|Vice-President of Pennsylvania]] (a position comparable to Lieutenant Governor).

Matthew Smith (Pennsylvania statesman)

Matthew Smith
He served briefly as [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Vice-Presidents of Council|Vice-President of Pennsylvania]] (a position analogous to the modern office of Lieutenant Governor) following the resignation of George Bryan on 11 October 1779.

Washington County, Pennsylvania

Washington CountyWashingtonWashington Counties
Seats were added for Washington, Fayette, Franklin, Montgomery, Dauphin, Luzerne, Huntingdon, and Allegheny as those counties were established.

George Ross (Pennsylvania statesman)

George Ross
He was elected [[Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania#Vice-Presidents of Council|Vice-President of Pennsylvania]] (a position equivalent to that of Lieutenant Governor) on 5 November 1788.

John Dickinson

Dickinson[John] DickinsonJohn Dickinson (delegate)
On October 10, 1782, Dickinson was elected to the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania.

William Findley

In the following years Findley served in the Ninth through Twelfth General Assemblies and on the Supreme Executive Council.

Thomas McKean

McKeanThomas McKeen
Moore is followed by Mifflin Street, McKean Street, and Snyder Street (the latter being Pennsylvania's second and third governors under the 1790 Constitution).
The Pennsylvania Supreme Executive Council was created in 1776 and counsellors were popularly elected for three-year terms.

John Neville (general)

John NevilleGeneral John NevilleGen. John Neville
In 1783, Neville was elected to the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania from Washington County.

Charles Biddle

Charles
Biddle served as Vice-President of Pennsylvania from October 10, 1785 until October 31, 1787 (also known as the Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania).

Peter Muhlenberg

John Peter Gabriel MuhlenbergPeterJohn Peter G. Muhlenberg
After the war, Muhlenberg was elected to the Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1784.

Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania

Lieutenant GovernorPennsylvania Lieutenant GovernorLt. Governor
Similarly, the office of Vice-President of Pennsylvania is analogous to the modern office of Lieutenant Governor.
From 1777 to 1790 the executive branch of Pennsylvania's state government was headed by a Supreme Executive Council consisting of a representative of each county and of the City of Philadelphia.

James McLene

Following his terms in the Continental Congress, he served on Pennsylvania's Supreme Executive Council until the conclusion of the war.

George Taylor (Pennsylvania politician)

George TaylorGeorge Taylor (1716-1781)George Taylor (delegate)
Instead, in March, he was appointed to Pennsylvania's Supreme Executive Council, which was formed to govern the province under its new constitution.