Supreme Governor of the Church of England

Supreme Governorhead of the Church of EnglandSupreme Governor of the Churchgovernor of their churchheadList of Supreme Governors of the Church of Englandof the Church of England in Earth under Jesus Christ Supreme HeadOnly Headqueen's ecclesiastical supremacyroyal supreme governance of the Church of England
Supreme Governor of the Church of England is a title held by the British monarch which signifies titular leadership over the Church of England.wikipedia
165 Related Articles

Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
Supreme Governor of the Church of England is a title held by the British monarch which signifies titular leadership over the Church of England. By 1536, Henry VIII had broken with Rome, seized the church's assets in England and declared the Church of England as the established church with himself as its head.
The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor.

Oath of Supremacy

SupremacyOathOath of Allegiance
To placate critics, the Oath of Supremacy which peers were required to swear, gave the monarch's title as Supreme Governor rather than Supreme Head of the church.
The Oath of Supremacy required any person taking public or church office in England to swear allegiance to the monarch as Supreme Governor of the Church of England.

Act of Supremacy 1558

Act of SupremacyActs of SupremacyAct of Supremacy of 1559
Elizabeth I ascended to the throne in 1558 and the next year Parliament passed the Act of Supremacy 1558 which restored the original act.
The act revived 10 acts which Mary I had reverted, significantly clarified and narrowed the definition of what constituted heresy, and confirmed Elizabeth as Supreme Governor of the Church of England.

Defender of the Faith

fidei defensorF: D:Defenders of the Faith
"Defender of the Faith" (Fidei Defensor) has been part of the English (and since the Union of Scotland and England, British) monarch's title since Henry VIII was granted it by Pope Leo X in 1521 in recognition of Henry's role in opposing the Protestant Reformation.
However, in 1544, the Parliament of England conferred the title "Defender of the Faith" on King Henry VIII and his successors, now the defenders of the Anglican faith, of which they (except the Catholic Mary I) remain the Supreme Governors (formally above the Archbishop of Canterbury as Primate).

Monarchy of the United Kingdom

MonarchBritish monarchQueen
Supreme Governor of the Church of England is a title held by the British monarch which signifies titular leadership over the Church of England.
The sovereign is the Supreme Governor of the established Church of England.

Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth
Elizabeth I ascended to the throne in 1558 and the next year Parliament passed the Act of Supremacy 1558 which restored the original act.
One of her first actions as queen was the establishment of an English Protestant church, of which she became the Supreme Governor.

Head of the Church

Supreme Head of the Church
This wording avoided the charge that the monarchy was claiming divinity or usurping Christ, whom the Bible explicitly identifies as Head of the Church.
At the time of the English Reformation, Henry VIII took for himself the title of Supreme Head of the Church of England, which was theologically problematic; his daughter Elizabeth I changed this to Supreme Governor of the Church of England.

Book of Common Prayer

Prayer Book1662 Book of Common Prayerprayer-book
The conservative nature of these changes underlines the fact that reformed principles were by no means universally popular – a fact that the Queen recognised: her revived Act of Supremacy, giving her the ambiguous title of Supreme Governor, passed without difficulty but the Act of Uniformity 1559, giving statutory force to the Prayer Book, passed through the House of Lords by only three votes.

Supreme Head of the Church of England

royal supremacysupreme authoritySupreme Head
To placate critics, the Oath of Supremacy which peers were required to swear, gave the monarch's title as Supreme Governor rather than Supreme Head of the church.
The new Oath of Supremacy that nobles were required to swear gave the Queen's title as Supreme Governor of the church rather than Supreme Head, to avoid the charge that the monarchy was claiming divinity or usurping Christ, whom the Bible explicitly identifies as Head of the Church.

Church of Scotland

KirkScottish ChurchPresbyterian
The British monarch vows to uphold the constitution of the Church of Scotland (a Presbyterian national church), but does not hold a leadership position in it. Nevertheless, the monarch appoints the Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland as his or her personal representative, with a ceremonial role.
When in Scotland, the British monarch simply attends church, as opposed to her role in the English Church as Supreme Governor.

Acts of Supremacy

royal supremacyAct of Supremacysupremacy
The Act of Supremacy 1534 confirmed the King's status as having supremacy over the church and required the peers to swear an oath recognising Henry's supremacy.
The use of the term Supreme Governor as opposed to Supreme Head pacified some Roman Catholics and those Protestants concerned about a female leader of the Church of England.

James II of England

James IIKing James IIDuke of York
In 1688, James ordered the Declaration read from the pulpits of every Anglican church, further alienating the Anglican bishops against the Catholic governor of their church.

Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland

Lord High CommissionerLord High Commissioner to the General AssemblyHer Majesty's High Commissioner
The British monarch vows to uphold the constitution of the Church of Scotland (a Presbyterian national church), but does not hold a leadership position in it. Nevertheless, the monarch appoints the Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland as his or her personal representative, with a ceremonial role.
Supreme Governor of the Church of England

Edward VIII abdication crisis

abdication crisisabdicationabdicated
The monarch was required to be in communion with the Church of England, and was its nominal head or Supreme Governor.

Edward VIII

Prince of WalesKing Edward VIIIEdward, Prince of Wales
As king, Edward was the titular head of the Church of England, and the clergy expected him to support the Church's teachings.

Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth IIthe QueenQueen
Aside from her official religious role as Supreme Governor of the established Church of England, she is a member of that church and also of the national Church of Scotland.

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Prime MinisterBritish Prime MinisterUK Prime Minister
As the Supreme Governor, the monarch formally appoints high-ranking members of the church on the advice of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, who is in turn advised by church leaders.

Christian state

established churchestablishedChristian countries
By 1536, Henry VIII had broken with Rome, seized the church's assets in England and declared the Church of England as the established church with himself as its head.

Peerage

peerpeerspeeress
The Act of Supremacy 1534 confirmed the King's status as having supremacy over the church and required the peers to swear an oath recognising Henry's supremacy.

Pope

papacypapalbishop of Rome
Henry's daughter, Mary I, attempted to restore the English Church's allegiance to the Pope and repealed the Act of Supremacy in 1555.

Parliament of England

Parliamentmember of ParliamentEnglish Parliament
Elizabeth I ascended to the throne in 1558 and the next year Parliament passed the Act of Supremacy 1558 which restored the original act.

Jesus

ChristJesus ChristJesus of Nazareth
This wording avoided the charge that the monarchy was claiming divinity or usurping Christ, whom the Bible explicitly identifies as Head of the Church.

Bible

biblicalScripturethe Bible
This wording avoided the charge that the monarchy was claiming divinity or usurping Christ, whom the Bible explicitly identifies as Head of the Church.

Pope Leo X

Leo XGiovanni de' MediciCardinal Giovanni de' Medici
"Defender of the Faith" (Fidei Defensor) has been part of the English (and since the Union of Scotland and England, British) monarch's title since Henry VIII was granted it by Pope Leo X in 1521 in recognition of Henry's role in opposing the Protestant Reformation.

Reformation

Protestantthe ReformationProtestants
"Defender of the Faith" (Fidei Defensor) has been part of the English (and since the Union of Scotland and England, British) monarch's title since Henry VIII was granted it by Pope Leo X in 1521 in recognition of Henry's role in opposing the Protestant Reformation.