Supreme court

The first four female justices of the Supreme Court of the United States: Sandra Day O'Connor, Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan.
Large courtroom of the Supreme Court of the Netherlands.
The courtroom of the Supreme Court of Canada

Highest court within the hierarchy of courts in many legal jurisdictions.

- Supreme court
The first four female justices of the Supreme Court of the United States: Sandra Day O'Connor, Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan.

58 related topics

Alpha

Arms as used by the Privy Council Office (United Kingdom)

Judicial Committee of the Privy Council

Highest court of appeal for certain British territories, some Commonwealth countries and a few UK bodies.

Highest court of appeal for certain British territories, some Commonwealth countries and a few UK bodies.

Arms as used by the Privy Council Office (United Kingdom)
Court 3 in Middlesex Guildhall, the normal location for Privy Council hearings.

Established on 13 August 1833 to hear appeals formerly heard by the King-in-Council, the Privy Council formerly acted as the court of last resort for the entire British Empire (other than for the United Kingdom itself), and continues to act as the highest court of appeal for several independent Commonwealth nations, the Crown Dependencies, and the British Overseas Territories.

Canadian criminal cases

Precedent

Principle or rule established in a previous legal case that is either binding on or persuasive without going to courts for a court or other tribunal when deciding subsequent cases with similar issues or facts.

Principle or rule established in a previous legal case that is either binding on or persuasive without going to courts for a court or other tribunal when deciding subsequent cases with similar issues or facts.

Canadian criminal cases

Usually, only an appeal accepted by the court of last resort will resolve such differences, and for many reasons, such appeals are often not granted.

Badge of The Supreme Court

Supreme Court of the United Kingdom

Badge of The Supreme Court
The Middlesex Guildhall in London is the location of the Supreme Court
Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal
Bench and inscription outside UK Supreme Court, "Lines for the Supreme Court" by Andrew Motion
Court 1 in the Supreme Court building
The Blake emblem with stylised depictions of the four floral emblems.

The Supreme Court (initialism: UKSC or the acronym: SCOTUK) is the final court of appeal in the United Kingdom for all civil cases, as well as for criminal cases originating in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Lord Chancellor

Not to be confused with Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Not to be confused with Chancellor of the Exchequer.

The Viscount Hailsham wearing the uniform of the Lord High Chancellor, depicted on a cigarette card produced for the Coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in 1937
Heraldic banner of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, who was the archbishop of York and lord chancellor, showing the arms of the See of York impaling his personal arms, with a cardinal's hat above. The griffin supporter holds the lord chancellor's mace
Jack Straw was the first commoner to be appointed as Lord Chancellor since 1578.

The bill also made other constitutional reforms, such as transferring the judicial duties of the House of Lords to a supreme court.

John Locke

Separation of powers

Separation of powers refers to the division of a state's government into branches, each with separate, independent powers and responsibilities, so that the powers of one branch are not in conflict with those of the other branches.

Separation of powers refers to the division of a state's government into branches, each with separate, independent powers and responsibilities, so that the powers of one branch are not in conflict with those of the other branches.

John Locke
Montesquieu
George Washington at Constitutional Convention of 1787, signing of U.S. Constitution

The Vermont Republic and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania both had a collective executive (Supreme Executive Council), a unicameral legislature (Assembly), a elected judiciary (Supreme Court), and the Council of Censors this group was responsible for ensuring constitutionality of the Executive, Legislative, and Judiciary branches of government and auditing taxes and could also either censure or impeach any member of government who they had found to have violated the constitution they also had the sole power to both call constitution conventions and ammend the constitution

Austrian Constitutional Court (Verfassungsgerichtshof VfGH), the oldest constitutional court in the world, resided in the building of the former Böhmische Hofkanzlei (Bohemian Court Chancellery), Judenplatz 11 in Vienna until 2012.

Constitutional court

Austrian Constitutional Court (Verfassungsgerichtshof VfGH), the oldest constitutional court in the world, resided in the building of the former Böhmische Hofkanzlei (Bohemian Court Chancellery), Judenplatz 11 in Vienna until 2012.
Hall for plenary sessions of the Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic in the building of the former Moravian Parliament in Brno
Bundesverfassungsgericht (BVerfG) in Karlsruhe
The Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation, established in 1991

A constitutional court is a high court that deals primarily with constitutional law.

A graphic representation of the legislative procedure in the United Kingdom.

Constitutional Reform Act 2005

Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, relevant to UK constitutional law.

Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, relevant to UK constitutional law.

A graphic representation of the legislative procedure in the United Kingdom.

There are several criteria set out by the law in order for a person to become eligible to sit on the Supreme Court.

Queen Anne addressing the House of Lords, c. 1708–14, by Peter Tillemans

House of Lords

Upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Queen Anne addressing the House of Lords, c. 1708–14, by Peter Tillemans
An early 19th-century illustration showing the east wall of the House of Lords in the centre.
The rejection of the People's Budget, proposed by David Lloyd George (above), precipitated a political crisis in 1909.
The House of Lords voting for the Parliament Act 1911
Punch 1911 cartoon shows Asquith and Lloyd George preparing coronets for 500 new peers to threaten takeover of House of Lords
The House of Lords paid tribute to Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, 12 April 2021
The number of members of the House of Lords since 1998
Charles Pepys as Lord Chancellor. The lord chancellor wore black-and-gold robes whilst presiding over the House of Lords.
Benches in the chamber are coloured red. In contrast, the benches in the House of Commons are green.
The royal thrones, c. 1902. Note that the Sovereign's throne (on left) is raised slightly higher than the consort's.

Most notably, until 2009 the House of Lords served as the court of last resort for most instances of UK law.

Queen Anne addressing the House of Lords, c. 1708–14, by Peter Tillemans

Judicial functions of the House of Lords

Upper chamber of Parliament and has government ministers, it for many centuries had a judicial function.

Upper chamber of Parliament and has government ministers, it for many centuries had a judicial function.

Queen Anne addressing the House of Lords, c. 1708–14, by Peter Tillemans

It functioned as a court of first instance for the trials of peers, for impeachments, and as a court of last resort in the United Kingdom and prior, the Kingdom of England.

The Court of Cassation building seen from the Seine

Court of Cassation (France)

The Court of Cassation building seen from the Seine
The building of the Court of Cassation

The Court of Cassation (Cour de cassation ) is one of the four courts of last resort in France.