Suribachi

suribachi'' and ''surikogiJapanese grinding bowlSuribachi and surikogisuribashisurikogiwooden pestle
For the landmark volcanic peak at Iwo Jima in Japan, see Mount Suribachiwikipedia
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Japanese cuisine

JapaneseJapanese foodJapan
These mortars are used in Japanese cooking to crush different ingredients such as sesame seeds.
One types are where usually vegetables such as green beans are tossed with white or black sesame seeds ground in a suribachi mortar bowl, flavored additionally with sugar and soy sauce.

Mortar and pestle

mortarpestlemortars
Suribachi (literally: grinding-bowl) and surikogi (literally: grind-powder-wood) are a Japanese mortar and pestle.
A regular sized Japanese mortar and pestle are called a suribachi and surikogi, respectively.

Zanthoxylum piperitum

sanshōchopisansho
Traditionally, the wood from the sanshō tree (Japanese prickly ash) was used, which adds a slight flavor to the food, although nowadays other woods are more common.
The young leaves are crushed and blended with miso using suribachi (mortar) to make a paste, a pesto sauce of sorts, and then used to make various aemono (tossed salad).

Iwo Jima

Iwo ToMount SuribachiIwo
The highest mountain on Iwo Jima, Mount Suribachi, was named after this kitchen device.
Named after a Japanese grinding bowl, the summit of Mount Suribachi is the highest point on the island.

Usu (mortar)

usuokineUsu'' and ''Kine
A larger sized Japanese mortar used to pound rice is an usu with a pestle called kine.
While the function of an usu is similar to the smaller suribachi and surikogi mortars, the shape is very different, as the usu usually lacks the rough pattern in the bowl, and has a differently shaped pestle which is used in a different manner.

Mount Suribachi

Mt. SuribachiMount SurabachiSuribachi
The highest mountain on Iwo Jima, Mount Suribachi, was named after this kitchen device.
The mountain's name derives from its shape, resembling a suribachi or "grinding bowl."

List of Japanese cooking utensils

cooking utensilJapanese kitchen tools
* List of Japanese cooking utensils

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
Suribachi (literally: grinding-bowl) and surikogi (literally: grind-powder-wood) are a Japanese mortar and pestle.

Sesame

sesame seedsesame seedsSesamum indicum
These mortars are used in Japanese cooking to crush different ingredients such as sesame seeds.

Pottery

potterceramicspotters
The suribachi is a pottery bowl, glazed on the outside and with a rough pattern called kushi-no-me on the unglazed inside.

Bowl

bowlscommunal bowlvessels
The suribachi is a pottery bowl, glazed on the outside and with a rough pattern called kushi-no-me on the unglazed inside.

Oroshigane

oroshiki
This surface is somewhat similar to the surface of the oroshigane (grater).

Food

foodsfoodstufffood products
Traditionally, the wood from the sanshō tree (Japanese prickly ash) was used, which adds a slight flavor to the food, although nowadays other woods are more common.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
The suribachi and surikogi arrived in Japan from China around 1000 AD.

Rice

Aman paddypaddypalay
A larger sized Japanese mortar used to pound rice is an usu with a pestle called kine.

Kitchen

open kitchenkitchensfitted kitchen
The highest mountain on Iwo Jima, Mount Suribachi, was named after this kitchen device.

Nanakusa-no-sekku

Festival of Seven HerbsNanakusa no sekkuNanakusa-gayu
On the morning of January 7, or the night before, people place the nanakusa, rice scoop, and/or wooden pestle on the cutting board and, facing the good-luck direction, chant "Before the birds of the continent (China) fly to Japan, let's get nanakusa" while cutting the herbs into pieces.

Kitsune no yomeiri

a procession of people wearing fox masks and traditional clothingkitsune (foxes) have their weddingsThe Foxes' Wedding
There are also legends in various areas that one could see a fox's wedding by performing some specific actions, and in the Fukushima Prefecture, it is said that at evening in 10/10 on the lunisolar calendar, if one wears a suribachi on one's head, and sticks a wooden pestle in one's waist, and stand under a date plum, it is possible to see a fox's wedding, and in the Aichi Prefecture, it is said that if one spits in a well, intertwine one's fingers and look through a gap in between, one is able to see a fox's wedding.

Gomashio

ごま塩
Generally, the gomashio used in macrobiotic cuisine will contain less salt than traditional Japanese gomashio (a ratio of 18 parts sesame seeds to 1 part salt is recommended for some individuals with a particularly restricted diet) and made by hand grinding in a suribachi.

Chinese yam

Dioscorea polystachyamountain yamnagaimo
The classic Japanese culinary technique is to grate the yam by grinding it against the rough grooved surface of a suribachi, which is an earthenware mortar.

Nirengi Castle

These pestles, or surikogi, were (and continue to be) used to crush and grind sesame seeds, spices, or other dry ingredients.

Makitra

A similar tool, called suribashi, is used in Japanese cuisine.