Surrender of Japan

Japanese surrenderJapan's surrenderJapan surrenderedsurrenderliberation of KoreasurrenderedJapanese capitulationLiberationJapan capitulatedJapanese surrendered
The surrender of Imperial Japan was announced by Japanese Emperor Hirohito on August 15 and formally signed on September 2, 1945, bringing the hostilities of World War II to a close.wikipedia
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Potsdam Declaration

Potsdam Proclamationdissolvedlast warning to surrender
Together with the British Empire and China, the United States called for the unconditional surrender of the Japanese armed forces in the Potsdam Declaration on July 26, 1945—the alternative being "prompt and utter destruction". Following these events, Emperor Hirohito intervened and ordered the Supreme Council for the Direction of the War to accept the terms the Allies had set down in the Potsdam Declaration for ending the war.
The Potsdam Declaration or the Proclamation Defining Terms for Japanese Surrender was a statement that called for the surrender of all Japanese armed forces during World War II.

Imperial Japanese Navy

JapaneseJapanese NavyJapanese Imperial Navy
By the end of July 1945, the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) was incapable of conducting major operations and an Allied invasion of Japan was imminent.
}}The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN; Kyūjitai: {{lang|ja|大日本帝國海軍}} Shinjitai: 大日本帝国海軍 "Navy of the Greater Japanese Empire", or 日本海軍 Nippon Kaigun, "Japanese Navy") was the navy of the Empire of Japan from 1868 until 1945, when it was dissolved following Japan's surrender in World War II.

Republic of China (1912–1949)

Republic of ChinaChinaChinese
Together with the British Empire and China, the United States called for the unconditional surrender of the Japanese armed forces in the Potsdam Declaration on July 26, 1945—the alternative being "prompt and utter destruction".
In 1946, after the surrender of Japan at the end of World War II in 1945, the Chinese Civil War between the KMT and CPC resumed, leading to the 1946 Constitution of the Republic of China replacing the 1928 Organic Law as the Republic's fundamental law.

End of World War II in Asia

end of World War IIendthe end of World War II
The surrender of Imperial Japan was announced by Japanese Emperor Hirohito on August 15 and formally signed on September 2, 1945, bringing the hostilities of World War II to a close.
Potsdam Declaration issued, calling for the surrender of all Japanese armed forces.

Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

atomic bombing of HiroshimaHiroshimabombing of Hiroshima
On August 6, 1945, at 8:15 AM local time, the United States detonated an atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima.
Japan surrendered to the Allies on August 15, six days after the Soviet Union's declaration of war and the bombing of Nagasaki.

Nuclear weapon

atomic bombnuclear weaponsnuclear
On August 6, 1945, at 8:15 AM local time, the United States detonated an atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima.
The ethics of these bombings and their role in Japan's surrender are subjects of debate.

Japanese Instrument of Surrender

Instrument of SurrenderJapanese surrenderInstrument of Surrender of Japan
The surrender ceremony was held on September 2, aboard the United States Navy battleship, at which officials from the Japanese government signed the Japanese Instrument of Surrender, thereby ending the hostilities.
The Japanese Instrument of Surrender was the written agreement that formalized the surrender of the Empire of Japan, marking the end of hostilities in World War II.

Soviet invasion of Manchuria

Manchurian Strategic Offensive Operationinvasion of Manchuriainvaded Manchuria
Late in the evening of August 8, 1945, in accordance with the Yalta agreements, but in violation of the Soviet–Japanese Neutrality Pact, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, and soon after midnight on August 9, 1945, the Soviet Union invaded the Imperial Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo.
The Soviet entry into the war and the defeat of the Kwantung Army was a significant factor in the Japanese government's decision to surrender unconditionally, as it made apparent the Soviet Union had no intention of acting as a third party in negotiating an end to hostilities on conditional terms.

Soviet–Japanese War

declared war on JapanSoviet-Japanese WarSoviet–Japanese War (1945)
Late in the evening of August 8, 1945, in accordance with the Yalta agreements, but in violation of the Soviet–Japanese Neutrality Pact, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, and soon after midnight on August 9, 1945, the Soviet Union invaded the Imperial Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo.
The defeat of Japan's Kwantung Army helped in the Japanese surrender and the termination of World War II.

Kyūjō incident

15 August 1945 rebelliona coupa coup d'état
After several more days of behind-the-scenes negotiations and a failed coup d'état, Emperor Hirohito gave a recorded radio address across the Empire on August 15.
It happened on the night of 14–15 August 1945, just before the announcement of Japan's surrender to the Allies.

Debate over the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

debateprovoked long-running debatesacademic and political issues
The role of the atomic bombings in Japan's unconditional surrender, and the ethics of the two attacks, is still debated.
The Soviet Union declared war on Japan an hour before 9 August and invaded Manchuria at one minute past midnight; Japan surrendered on 15 August.

Japanese holdout

Japanese holdoutsholdoutsholdout
Allied civilians and military personnel alike celebrated V-J Day, the end of the war; however, isolated soldiers and personnel from Japan's far-flung forces throughout Asia and the Pacific refused to surrender for months and years afterwards, some even refusing into the 1970s.
Japanese holdouts were soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army and Imperial Japanese Navy during the Pacific Theatre of World War II that continued fighting after the surrender of Japan in August 1945.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Together with the British Empire and China, the United States called for the unconditional surrender of the Japanese armed forces in the Potsdam Declaration on July 26, 1945—the alternative being "prompt and utter destruction".
The United States eventually developed the first nuclear weapons and used them on Japan in the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; causing the Japanese to surrender on September 2, ending World War II.

Philippines campaign (1944–1945)

Philippines campaignPhilippines Campaign (1944–45)Philippines
By 1945, the Japanese had suffered a string of defeats for nearly two years in the South West Pacific, the Marianas campaign, and the Philippines campaign.
United States and Philippine Commonwealth military forces were progressing in liberating territory and islands when the Japanese forces in the Philippines were ordered to surrender by Tokyo on August 15, 1945, after the dropping of the atomic bombs on mainland Japan and the Soviet invasion of Manchuria.

Operation Downfall

invasion of JapanOperation OlympicAllied invasion
By the end of July 1945, the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) was incapable of conducting major operations and an Allied invasion of Japan was imminent. General Korechika Anami, the Army minister, was ambivalent, insisting that diplomacy must wait until "after the United States has sustained heavy losses" in Operation Ketsugō.
The planned operation was canceled when Japan surrendered following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Soviet declaration of war and the invasion of Manchuria.

Strategic bombing during World War II

strategic bombing campaignstrategic bombingstrategic bombing campaign against Germany
The destruction of the Japanese merchant fleet, combined with the strategic bombing of Japanese industry, had wrecked Japan's war economy.
However some argued that strategic bombing of non-military targets could significantly reduce enemy industrial capacity and production and in the opinion of its interwar period proponents, the surrender of Japan vindicated strategic bombing.

Kwantung Army

Kwangtung ArmyGuandong ArmyKantōgun
Following Germany's defeat, the Soviet Union began quietly redeploying its battle-hardened European forces to the Far East, in addition to about forty divisions that had been stationed there since 1941, as a counterbalance to the million-strong Kwantung Army.
The Kwantung Army surrendered to the Soviets the day after the Surrender of Japan and was subsequently dissolved.

Matsushiro Underground Imperial Headquarters

an underground facility in the mountains outside Naganoconstructing an underground headquartersImperial General Headquarters in Matsushiro Fortress
In the event of invasion, these caves, the Matsushiro Underground Imperial Headquarters, were to be used by the Army to direct the war and to house the Emperor and his family.
Construction began on November 11, 1944, and continued until Japan's surrender on August 15, 1945.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
While publicly stating their intent to fight on to the bitter end, Japan's leaders (the Supreme Council for the Direction of the War, also known as the "Big Six") were privately making entreaties to the publicly neutral Soviet Union to mediate peace on terms more favorable to the Japanese.
This conflict ended with a decisive Soviet victory, contributing to the unconditional surrender of Japan and the end of World War II.

Hirohito

Emperor HirohitoEmperor ShōwaShōwa
Following these events, Emperor Hirohito intervened and ordered the Supreme Council for the Direction of the War to accept the terms the Allies had set down in the Potsdam Declaration for ending the war.
After Japan's surrender, he was not prosecuted for war crimes as many other leading government figures were, and his degree of involvement in wartime decisions remains controversial.

Korechika Anami

Anami KorechikaGeneral Korechika Anami
General Korechika Anami, the Army minister, was ambivalent, insisting that diplomacy must wait until "after the United States has sustained heavy losses" in Operation Ketsugō.
Korechika Anami was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II, and was War Minister at the time of the surrender of Japan.

Manchukuo

ManchuriaEmperor of ManchukuoPrime Minister of Manchukuo
Kido's proposal did not contemplate Allied occupation of Japan, prosecution of war criminals or substantial change in Japan's system of government, nor did Kido suggest that Japan might be willing to consider relinquishing territories acquired prior to 1937 including Formosa, Karafuto, Korea, the formerly German islands in the Pacific and even Manchukuo.
Manchukuo's government was dissolved in 1945 after the surrender of Imperial Japan at the end of World War II.

Harry S. Truman

Harry TrumanTrumanHarry S Truman
Sixteen hours later, American President Harry S. Truman called again for Japan's surrender, warning them to "expect a rain of ruin from the air, the like of which has never been seen on this earth."
Japan agreed to surrender the following day.

Ministry of the Army

Minister of WarArmy MinisterMinistry of War
General Korechika Anami, the Army minister, was ambivalent, insisting that diplomacy must wait until "after the United States has sustained heavy losses" in Operation Ketsugō. Japanese policy-making centered on the Supreme Council for the Direction of the War (created in 1944 by earlier Prime Minister Kuniaki Koiso), the so-called "Big Six"—the Prime Minister, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Minister of the Army, Minister of the Navy, Chief of the Army General Staff, and Chief of the Navy General Staff.
With the surrender of the Empire of Japan in World War II, the Army Ministry was abolished together with the Imperial Japanese Army by the Allied occupation authorities in November 1945 and was not revived in the post-war Constitution of Japan.

Kure Naval Arsenal

KureKure Navy YardJapanese shipyard at Kure
Following a series of raids on the Japanese shipyard at Kure, the only major warships in fighting order were six aircraft carriers, four cruisers, and one battleship, none of which could be fueled adequately.
After the surrender of Japan in 1945, the Kure Naval Arsenal was turned over to civilian hands.