Surrender of Japan

Japanese surrenderJapan's surrenderJapan surrenderedsurrenderliberation of KoreasurrenderedJapanese capitulationLiberationJapan capitulatedJapanese surrendered
The surrender of Imperial Japan was announced by Japanese Emperor Hirohito on August 15 and formally signed on September 2, 1945, bringing the hostilities of World War II to a close.wikipedia
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Korea under Japanese rule

KoreaJapanese KoreaJapanese occupation
While maintaining a sufficient level of diplomatic engagement with the Japanese to give them the impression they might be willing to mediate, the Soviets were covertly preparing to attack Japanese forces in Manchuria and Korea (in addition to South Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands) in fulfillment of promises they had secretly made to the United States and the United Kingdom at the Tehran and Yalta Conferences. This would give the Soviets time to complete the transfer of their troops from the Western Front to the Far East, and conquer Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, Korea, South Sakhalin, the Kuriles, and possibly Hokkaidō (starting with a landing at Rumoi).
Japanese rule over Korea ended on 15 August 1945 upon the Surrender of Japan in World War II and the armed forces of the United States and the Soviet Union occupied the territory.

Dalian

DairenDalian CityDalian, China
Secondary objectives were leases for the Chinese Eastern Railway, Southern Manchuria Railway, Dairen, and Port Arthur.
With the unconditional surrender of Japan in August 1945, Dairen was passed to the Soviets, whose Manchurian Strategic Offensive Operation had liberated the city.

Occupation of Japan

occupationoccupied JapanAllied occupation of Japan
On August 28, the occupation of Japan led by the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers began.
After the surrender of Japan in 1945, the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers abolished all forms of censorship and controls on Freedom of Speech, which was also integrated into Article 21 of the 1947 Constitution of Japan.

Karafuto Prefecture

KarafutoGovernor-General of KarafutoSouth Sakhalin
While maintaining a sufficient level of diplomatic engagement with the Japanese to give them the impression they might be willing to mediate, the Soviets were covertly preparing to attack Japanese forces in Manchuria and Korea (in addition to South Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands) in fulfillment of promises they had secretly made to the United States and the United Kingdom at the Tehran and Yalta Conferences. This would give the Soviets time to complete the transfer of their troops from the Western Front to the Far East, and conquer Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, Korea, South Sakhalin, the Kuriles, and possibly Hokkaidō (starting with a landing at Rumoi).
Ōtomari (Korsakov) was the capital of Karafuto from 1905 to 1908 and Toyohara (Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk) from 1908 to August 1945 when the Japanese administration ceased to function in the Invasion of South Sakhalin by the Soviet Union after the Surrender of Japan in World War II.

Mengjiang

Mongol Military GovernmentMongol United Autonomous GovernmentInner Mongolia
This would give the Soviets time to complete the transfer of their troops from the Western Front to the Far East, and conquer Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, Korea, South Sakhalin, the Kuriles, and possibly Hokkaidō (starting with a landing at Rumoi).
The territory returned to Chinese control after the defeat of the Japanese Empire in 1945.

Hideki Tojo

Hideki TōjōTojoTōjō
In July 1944, following the loss of Saipan, General Hideki Tōjō was replaced as prime minister by General Kuniaki Koiso, who declared that the Philippines would be the site of the decisive battle.
After Japan's unconditional surrender in 1945, U.S. general Douglas MacArthur ordered the arrest of forty alleged war criminals, including Tojo.

Battle of Saipan

Saipaninvasion of Saipancapture and occupation of Saipan
In July 1944, following the loss of Saipan, General Hideki Tōjō was replaced as prime minister by General Kuniaki Koiso, who declared that the Philippines would be the site of the decisive battle.
Oba's holdout lasted for over a year (approximately 16 months) before finally surrendering on December 1, 1945, three months after the official surrender of Japan.

Taiwan under Japanese rule

Japanese ruleTaiwanTaiwan, Empire of Japan
Japanese rule of Taiwan ended after the surrender of Japan concluded World War II in August 1945, and the territory was placed under the control of the Republic of China (ROC) with the issuing of General Order No. 1.

Franck Report

Following a protest by scientists involved in the project, in the form of the Franck Report, the Committee re-examined the use of the bomb.
The Franck Report of June 1945 was a document signed by several prominent nuclear physicists recommending that the United States not use the atomic bomb as a weapon to prompt the surrender of Japan in World War II.

Battle of Okinawa

Okinawainvasion of Okinawaassault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto
The Allies captured the nearby islands of Iwo Jima and Okinawa in the first half of 1945.
The numbers correspond to recorded deaths during the Battle of Okinawa from the time of the American landings in the Kerama Islands on March 26, 1945, to the signing of the Japanese surrender on September 2, 1945, in addition to all Okinawan casualties in the Pacific War in the 15 years from the Manchurian Incident, along with those who died in Okinawa from war-related events in the year before the battle and the year after the surrender.

Japanese nuclear weapon program

Japanese atomic programJapanese nuclear weapons programdevelop usable nuclear weapons
The Japanese Army and Navy had their own independent atomic-bomb programs and therefore the Japanese understood enough to know how very difficult building it would be.
Like the German nuclear weapons program, it suffered from an array of problems, and was ultimately unable to progress beyond the laboratory stage before the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrender in August 1945.

Pacific War

Pacific TheaterPacificPacific Theatre
In the largest and longest bombing raid of the Pacific War, more than 400 B-29s attacked Japan during daylight on August 14, and more than 300 that night.
The formal surrender of Japan ceremony took place aboard the battleship in Tokyo Bay on 2 September 1945.

Nagano (city)

NaganoNagano, JapanNagano, Nagano
A set of caves were excavated near Nagano on Honshu, the largest of the Japanese islands.

Kantarō Suzuki

Suzuki KantarōSuzukiSuzuki Kantaro
After the Japanese loss of the Philippines, Koiso in turn was replaced by Admiral Kantarō Suzuki.
After the surrender of Japan became public, Suzuki resigned and Prince Higashikuni became next prime minister.

Joseph Stalin

StalinJosef StalinJosif Stalin
There were two camps: the so-called "peace" camp favored a diplomatic initiative to persuade Joseph Stalin, the leader of the Soviet Union, to mediate a settlement between the Allies and Japan; and the hardliners who favored fighting one last "decisive" battle that would inflict so many casualties on the Allies that they would be willing to offer more lenient terms.
These events led to the Japanese surrender and the war's end.

Shigenori Tōgō

Shigenori TogoTogo ShigenoriTōgō Shigenori
Tōgō was one of the Cabinet Ministers who advocated Japanese surrender in the summer of 1945.

Soemu Toyoda

Toyoda SoemuAdmiral Soemu ToyodaAdmiral Toyoda
Admiral Soemu Toyoda, the Chief of the Naval General Staff, argued that even if the United States had made one, they could not have many more.
Toyoda participated in numerous Imperial Conferences concerning the surrender of Japan.

End of World War II in Europe

1945end of the war in Europeend of the war
Following Germany's defeat, the Soviet Union began quietly redeploying its battle-hardened European forces to the Far East, in addition to about forty divisions that had been stationed there since 1941, as a counterbalance to the million-strong Kwantung Army.

Robert Butow

Robert J. C. Butow
Robert J. C. Butow wrote:
His doctoral thesis on the Japanese surrender (titled Japan's Decision to Surrender) was subsequently published as his first book.

Henry A. Wallace

Henry WallaceWallaceHenry Agard Wallace
Although the Vice President Henry A. Wallace had been involved in the Manhattan Project since the beginning, his successor, Harry S. Truman, was not briefed on the project by Stimson until April 23, 1945, eleven days after he became president on Roosevelt's death on April 12, 1945.
World War II came to an end in September 1945 with the Surrender of Japan, and relations with the Soviet Union became a central matter of foreign policy.

Douglas MacArthur

General Douglas MacArthurGeneral MacArthurMacArthur
Japanese officials left for Manila on August 19 to meet Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers Douglas MacArthur, and to be briefed on his plans for the occupation.
He officially accepted the Surrender of Japan on 2 September 1945 aboard the, which was anchored in Tokyo Bay, and he oversaw the occupation of Japan from 1945 to 1951.

Japanese war crimes

war crimesJapanese war criminalsJapanese atrocities
After the formal surrender on September 2 aboard Missouri, investigations into Japanese war crimes began quickly.
Some war crimes were committed by Japanese military personnel during the late 19th century, but most Japanese war crimes were committed during the first part of the Shōwa Era, the name given to the reign of Emperor Hirohito, until the surrender of the Empire of Japan in 1945.

Victory over Japan Day

V-J DayVJ DayVJ-Day
Allied civilians and military personnel alike celebrated V-J Day, the end of the war; however, isolated soldiers and personnel from Japan's far-flung forces throughout Asia and the Pacific refused to surrender for months and years afterwards, some even refusing into the 1970s.
Victory over Japan Day (also known as V-J Day, Victory in the Pacific Day, or V-P Day ) is the day on which Imperial Japan surrendered in World War II, in effect bringing the war to an end.

Jewel Voice Broadcast

Gyokuon-hōsōannouncement of Japan's surrenderImperial Rescript on the Termination of the War
The surrender of Imperial Japan was announced by Japanese Emperor Hirohito on August 15 and formally signed on September 2, 1945, bringing the hostilities of World War II to a close.
The Jewel Voice Broadcast was the radio broadcast in which Japanese Emperor Hirohito (Emperor Shōwa 昭和天皇 Shōwa-tennō) read out the Imperial Rescript on the Termination of the Greater East Asia War, announcing to the Japanese people that the Japanese Government had accepted the Potsdam Declaration demanding the unconditional surrender of the Japanese military at the end of World War II.

Kenji Hatanaka

Late on the night of August 12, 1945, Major Kenji Hatanaka, along with Lieutenant Colonels Masataka Ida, Masahiko Takeshita (Anami's brother-in-law), and Inaba Masao, and Colonel Okitsugu Arao, the Chief of the Military Affairs Section, spoke to War Minister Korechika Anami (the army minister and "most powerful figure in Japan besides the Emperor himself"), and asked him to do whatever he could to prevent acceptance of the Potsdam Declaration.
As one of the leaders of a group of Japanese officers determined to prevent the acceptance of the Potsdam Declaration and therefore the surrender of Japan, Hatanaka attempted a coup d'état on 14–15 August 1945.