A report on Sushi

President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Sukiyabashi Jiro
Sushi by Hiroshige
Sushi platter in takeway
Chirashizushi with raw ingredients
Three pieces of inarizushi
Funa-zushi (narezushi made from nigorobuna)
Nigirizushi
Several types of nigirizushi, rice hand-pressed with various seafood, including tuna, eel, and sea urchin roe gunkanmaki
Japanese cutlassfish oshizushi at a restaurant in Minamata City, Kumamoto Prefecture
Oshi-zushi (Pressed sushi)
Norway roll (ノルウェー巻き). A Norwegian businessman introduced the use of salmon as a sushi ingredient to Japan in the 1980s.
Uramakizushi rolls
Rainbow roll, uramaki with multiple fillings including shrimp tempura, salmon, avocado, mango, with rice mixed with tobiko
Sushi chef preparing nigirizushi, Kyoto, Japan
Sheets of nori
Sushi made of meats other than fish (whether raw or cooked) is a variation often seen in Japan.
Yaki anago-ippon-nigiri (焼きアナゴ一本握り) – a roasted and sweet-sauced whole conger eel
Ebifurai-maki (エビフライ巻き) – fried-shrimp roll
Sushi in shops are usually sold in plastic trays.
Sushi served on a wooden platter at a sushi restaurant in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan
Sushi in restaurant in Vienna, Austria
Meat sushi
{{transl|ja|Makizushi}} topped with {{transl|ja|tobiko}}
{{transl|ja|Makizushi}} in preparation
{{transl|ja|Futomaki}}
{{transl|ja|Kappamaki}}
{{transl|ja|Nattōmaki}}
{{transl|ja|Tekkamaki}}
{{transl|ja|Ehōmaki}}
{{nihongo3|fatty tuna belly|鮪とろ握り|Toro nigiri}}
{{nihongo|Salmon roll|巻き鮭}}
{{nihongo3|persimmon leaf|柿の葉寿司|Kakinoha}} sushi
{{nihongo||茶巾寿司|Chakin-zushi}}, wrapped in thin omelette
{{nihongo|Sushi plate|盛り合わせ}}
{{nihongo||イクラ軍艦巻き|Ikura gunkan-maki}}
{{nihongo3|bamboo leaf|笹寿司|Sasa}} sushi
{{nihongo3|teriyaki-roasted freshwater eel|鰻寿司|Unagi}} sushi
{{transl|ja|Nigirizushi}} for sale at a supermarket in Tokyo
{{nihongo|Assorted sushi|盛り合わせ}}
{{nihongo|Assorted Western sushi|盛り合わせ}}
Western California roll and tuna roll {{transl|ja|uramaki}} ({{lang|ja|カリフォルニア巻き}})
{{nihongo|Western spicy tuna hand roll|スパイシーツナロール}}
{{nihongo|Western spicy shrimp roll|スパイシー海老ロール}}
{{transl|ja|Gari}} (ginger)
Wasabi
thumb|right|{{transl|ja|Tamago}} sushi

Japanese dish of prepared vinegared rice (鮨飯), usually with some sugar and salt, accompanied by a variety of ingredients (ねた), such as seafood, often raw, and vegetables.

- Sushi

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Wasabi

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Plant of the family Brassicaceae, which also includes horseradish and mustard in other genera.

Plant of the family Brassicaceae, which also includes horseradish and mustard in other genera.

Wasabi paste on a plate
Wasabi crop growing at Azumino, Nagano, Japan
Fresh wasabi stems
A drawing of a wasabi plant, published in 1828 by Iwasaki Kanen
Plastic bottle of prepared wasabi sauce in USA
Wasabi on a metal oroshigane grater

A paste made from its ground rhizomes is used as a pungent condiment for sushi and other foods.

A gyro sandwich garnished with mint leaves

Garnish (food)

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Item or substance used as a decoration or embellishment accompanying a prepared food dish or drink.

Item or substance used as a decoration or embellishment accompanying a prepared food dish or drink.

A gyro sandwich garnished with mint leaves
Sun dried tomato used as garnish for the vegan Penne
A frosted muffin garnished with confetti candy
A gin martini with a lime twist
Chilled leek and potato soup garnished with croutons
Indonesian festive tumpeng rice cone, garnished with decoratively sliced chili pepper and cucumber.
Japanese miso ramen garnished with edible seaweed, sesame and scallion
Jidan, a Korean egg garnish for soups
Fried onions are used as a garnish
A chocolate cake garnished with violets
A slice of butter cake garnished with sliced almonds
Egg Biryani garnished with cilantro
A cappuccino garnished with cocoa powder
Ice cream garnished with pistachio pieces and rolled wafers
A crabcake with a cream sauce and a garnish of microgreens
Cheese tray garnished with red pepper rings and chicory
A Bloody Mary with several garnishes
A wedding cake topped with a wedding cake topper
A partially-eaten loaf of lemon-flavored polenta cake, glazed and garnished with crushed freeze-dried raspberry.

Sushi may be garnished with baran, a type of plastic grass or leaf.

Tokugawa Ieyasu, first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate

Edo period

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Period between 1603 and 1867 in the history of Japan, when Japan was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyo.

Period between 1603 and 1867 in the history of Japan, when Japan was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyo.

Tokugawa Ieyasu, first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate
Bird's-eye view of Nagasaki bay, with the island Dejima at mid-left (1820)
The San Juan Bautista is represented in Claude Deruet's painting of Hasekura Tsunenaga in Rome in 1617, as a galleon with Hasekura's flag (red manji on orange background) on the top mast.
Itinerary and dates of the travels of Hasekura Tsunenaga
The house of the merchant (Fukagawa Edo Museum )
Social classes during the Edo period (Tokugawa shogunate).
Scaled pocket plan of Edo
A set of three ukiyo-e prints depicting Osaka's bustling shipping industry. by Gansuitei Yoshitoyo. 1854–1859.
Tokugawa coinage: Ōban, Koban, Ichibuban (1601-1695).
Nihonbashi Fish Market Prosperity (Edo period) by Utagawa Kuniyasu
Terakoya, private educational school
Wadokei, Japanese-made clockwatch, 18th century
Kaitai Shinsho, Japan's first treatise on Western anatomy, published in 1774
Karakuri puppet Moji-kaki doll made by Tanaka Hisashige. Using mechanical power, a puppet dips a brush into ink and writes a character on paper. 19th century
Red and White Plum Blossoms by Ogata Kōrin, 1712-1716
Mounting for wakizashi decorated with lacquer of maki-e technique. 18th century
The Great Wave off Kanagawa, full-colour ukiyo-e woodblock print, Hokusai, c. 1829–1832
Outer kimono for a young woman (uchikake), 1840–1870, Khalili Collection of Kimono
Dai-Roku Daiba (第六台場) or "No. 6 Battery", one of the original Edo-era battery islands
One of the cannons of Odaiba, now at the Yasukuni Shrine. 80-pound bronze, bore: 250mm, length: 3830mm
Matthew Calbraith Perry
Landing of Commodore Perry, Officers and Men of the Squadron To meet the Imperial Commissioners at Kurihama Yokosuka March 8th, 1854
Tokugawa Yoshinobu in later life
Kanrin Maru, Japan's first screw-driven steam warship, 1855
Samurai in western clothing of the Tokugawa Shogunate Army (1866).
Reading stand with Mt. Yoshino, decorated with lacquer of maki-e technique. 18th century
Ukiyo-e based on kabuki actors became popular. Ichikawa Danjūrō V in the popular kabuki play Shibaraku, by Utagawa Kunimasa, 1796
Ukiyo-e depicting Sushi, by Hiroshige
A boarding place for a ferry on the Miya River, which is crowded with people visiting Ise Grand Shrine. by Hiroshige
{{lang|ja-Latn|Inro}} and {{lang|ja-Latn|Netsuke}}, 18th century
Ladies fashion in 1700s by Utagawa Toyokuni
Bird's-eye view of Nagasaki bay, with the island Dejima at mid-left (1833)

Particularly popular among ordinary people were stalls serving fast food such as soba, sushi, tempura, and unagi, tofu restaurants, teahouses and izakaya (Japanese-style pubs).

List of raw fish dishes

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About raw fish or shellfish.

About raw fish or shellfish.

Differential symptoms of parasite infections by raw fish. All have gastrointestinal, but otherwise distinct, symptoms.

Though not a health concern in thoroughly cooked fish, parasites are a concern when consumers eat raw or lightly preserved fish such as sashimi, sushi, ceviche, and gravlax.

Hanaya Yohei

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Hanaya Yohei (華屋 与兵衛 or 花屋 與兵衛; 1799–1858) is generally credited as the inventor of today's Tokyo-style (Edomae-zushi; 江戸前寿司) nigiri sushi (hand-formed sushi) at the end of Japan's Edo period.

A variety of vegetarian food ingredients that are also vegan.

Vegetarian cuisine

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Based on food that meets vegetarian standards by not including meat and animal tissue products .

Based on food that meets vegetarian standards by not including meat and animal tissue products .

A variety of vegetarian food ingredients that are also vegan.
Vegetable soup and cheese sandwich, a meal which is suitable for vegetarians but not vegans
Vegetarian food products made from cereal grains.
Buddha's delight, a famous Chinese vegetarian dish.
Sautéed tempeh with green beans, an Indonesian dish
Pasta con i peperoni cruschi, a vegetarian/vegan dish from Italy.
Tolstoy's vegetarian breakfast
Palatschinken with ice cream, fruits and fruit compote from Austria
Pilaf with soya nuggets
Labeling used in India to distinguish vegetarian products (left) from non-vegetarian products (right).

Japanese foods such as castella, dorayaki, edamame, name kojiru, mochi, taiyaki, tempura, vegetable sushi and wagashi. Miso soup is made from fermented white or red soy bean paste, garnished with scallions or seaweed. Although most traditional versions are made from fish stock (dashi), it can be made with vegetable stock as well.

Squid

Squid as food

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Eaten in many cuisines; in English, the culinary name calamari is often used for squid dishes.

Eaten in many cuisines; in English, the culinary name calamari is often used for squid dishes.

Squid
Drying squid
 in Ulleungdo, Korea
Chinese-style fried baby squid
Japanese Ikameshi
Japanese Ika Sōmen (squid noodle)
Japanese sushi
Japanese Ika no shiokara
Squid steaks, uncooked
Squid jerky
Korean ojingeo-jeot (salted squid)
Korean ojingeo-sundae (stuffed squid)
Korean Ojingeo-Twigim along with Gochu-Twigim. Ojingeo is squid whereas Gochu is pepper

In Japan, squid is used in almost every type of dish, including sushi, sashimi, and tempura.

Some modern Hawaiian dishes. From top left, clockwise: tripe stew (ʻōpū kū), rice (laiki), ʻopihi poke, laulau, squid lūʻau, pipikaula shortribs, kālua puaʻa (kālua pig), and poi in the center.

Cuisine of Hawaii

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The cuisine of Hawaii incorporates five distinct styles of food, reflecting the diverse food history of settlement and immigration in the Hawaiian Islands.

The cuisine of Hawaii incorporates five distinct styles of food, reflecting the diverse food history of settlement and immigration in the Hawaiian Islands.

Some modern Hawaiian dishes. From top left, clockwise: tripe stew (ʻōpū kū), rice (laiki), ʻopihi poke, laulau, squid lūʻau, pipikaula shortribs, kālua puaʻa (kālua pig), and poi in the center.
Taro, Colocasia esculenta, was brought to Hawaii by the Polynesians
Kukui foliage, flowers, and nut (candlenut) was brought to Hawaii by Polynesians.
Hawaiian man pounding taro to make poi. Taro plants can be seen growing behind him
Hawaiian shave ice, believed to have been introduced to Hawaii from Japan by Japanese immigrants who ate kakigōri
Royal Hawaiian Hotel was one of the first hotels built along the shores of Waikīkī
Seared ahi and wasabi beurre blanc sauce
Hala, the fruit of the Pandanus tectorius tree
Spam musubi, a fusion of Japanese sushi that uses fried Spam instead of raw fish. Spam was brought to Hawaii with American GIs and popularized on the islands. Spam musubi was developed in the 1980s
poke bowl, Maui, Hawaii
Tako (octopus) poke with tomatoes, green onion, maui onion, soy sauce, sesame oil, sea salt, chili pepper
A loco moco plate lunch, with fried saimin and macaroni salad
Ahi tuna limu (seaweed) ahi poke
Spam musubi
Wonton saimin

Lomi salmon—sushi-grade salmon cubed combined with tomatoes, Maui onions, and chili pepper

Octopus at Tsukiji fish market

Octopus as food

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People of some cultures eat octopus.

People of some cultures eat octopus.

Octopus at Tsukiji fish market
Fishermen hunting octopus
Takoyaki
muneo-sukhoe, blanched octopus
Octopus and rice stew pot

Octopus is a common ingredient in Japanese cuisine, including sushi, takoyaki and akashiyaki.

Salmon

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Common name for several species of ray-finned fish in the family Salmonidae.

Common name for several species of ray-finned fish in the family Salmonidae.

Life cycle of Pacific salmon
Redds on riverbed
Bear cub with salmon
Sockeye salmon jumping over beaver dam
Henneguya salminicola, a myxozoan parasite commonly found in the flesh of salmonids on the West Coast of Canada, in coho salmon
Wild fisheries – commercial capture in tonnes of all true wild salmon species 1950–2010, as reported by the FAO
Angler and gillie land a salmon, Scotland
Aquaculture production in tonnes of all true salmon species 1950–2010, as reported by the FAO
Artificially incubated chum salmon
Spawning sockeye salmon in Becharof Creek, Becharof Wilderness, Alaska
Significant declines in the size of many species of Pacific salmon over the past 30 years are negatively impacting salmon fecundity, nutrient transport, commercial fishery profits, and rural food security.
Salmon sashimi
Seine fishing for salmon – Wenzel Hollar, 1607–1677
Scales on the "Big Fish" or "Salmon of Knowledge" celebrates the return of fish to the River Lagan
Juvenile salmon, parr, grow up in the relatively protected natal river
The parr lose their camouflage bars and become smolt as they become ready for the transition to the ocean.
Male ocean-phase adult sockeye
Male spawning-phase adult sockeye

Salmon and salmon roe have only recently come into use in making sashimi (raw fish) and sushi.