Sussex

County of SussexSussex, EnglandSouth SaxonSussex CoastWest Sussex Lewes, Sussex, EnglandCountyCounty of Sussex in EnglandCounty Sussex, EnglandEnglish county
Sussex, from the Old English Sūþsēaxe (South Saxons), is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex.wikipedia
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West Sussex

W. SussexSussexCounty of West Sussex
It is bounded to the west by Hampshire, north by Surrey, northeast by Kent, south by the English Channel, and divided for many purposes into the ceremonial counties of West Sussex and East Sussex.
West Sussex is the western part of the historic county of Sussex, formerly a medieval kingdom.

Kingdom of Sussex

SussexSouth SaxonsKingdom of the South Saxons
Sussex, from the Old English Sūþsēaxe (South Saxons), is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. The name derives from the Kingdom of Sussex, which was founded, according to legend, by Ælle of Sussex in AD 477.
The Kingdom of Sussex had its initial focus in a territory based on the former kingdom and Romano-British civitas of the Regnenses and its boundaries coincided in general with those of the later county of Sussex.

East Sussex

EastSussexCounty of East Sussex
It is bounded to the west by Hampshire, north by Surrey, northeast by Kent, south by the English Channel, and divided for many purposes into the ceremonial counties of West Sussex and East Sussex.
East Sussex is part of the historic county of Sussex, which has its roots in the ancient kingdom of the South Saxons, who established themselves there in the 5th century AD, after the departure of the Romans.

History of Sussex

east SussexhistoryHistory of West Sussex
In 2007, Sussex Day was created to celebrate the county's rich culture and history.
Sussex, from the Old English 'Sūþsēaxe' ('South Saxons'), is a historic county in South East England.

Culture of Sussex

culturefolkloreSussex culture
In 2007, Sussex Day was created to celebrate the county's rich culture and history.
The culture of Sussex refers to the pattern of human activity and symbolism associated with Sussex and its people.

Ælle of Sussex

ÆlleAelleAelle of Sussex
The name derives from the Kingdom of Sussex, which was founded, according to legend, by Ælle of Sussex in AD 477.
Ælle (also Aelle or Ella) is recorded in early sources as the first king of the South Saxons, reigning in what is now called Sussex, England, from 477 to perhaps as late as 514.

Sussex County, New Jersey

Sussex CountySussex Sussex County, New Jersey
Three United States counties (in Delaware, New Jersey, and Virginia), and a former county/land division of Western Australia, are named after Sussex.
The county was established in 1753 and named after historic County Sussex, England.

Rape (county subdivision)

Raperapesa county subdivision
Sussex's six martlets are today held to symbolise the traditional six sub-divisions of the county known as rapes.
A rape is a traditional territorial sub-division of the county of Sussex in England, formerly used for various administrative purposes.

Flag of Sussex

Sussex Flagcounty flag
The flag of Sussex consists of six gold martlets, or heraldic swallows, on a blue background, blazoned as Azure, six martlets or.
The Flag of Sussex is the flag of the English county of Sussex.

Historic counties of England

Historicallyhistoric countyhistoric county boundaries
Sussex, from the Old English Sūþsēaxe (South Saxons), is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex.
Kent derives from the Kingdom of Kent, and Essex, Sussex and Middlesex come from the East Saxons, South Saxons and Middle Saxons.

South East England

South EastSouth East of EnglandSouth-East England
Sussex, from the Old English Sūþsēaxe (South Saxons), is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex.
The North Downs Line runs from Berkshire then through Surrey to connect with Sussex and Kent.

Middlesex

County of MiddlesexMiddlesex, EnglandMiddlesex County
Essex, Middlesex and Wessex).
The word is formed from the Old English, 'middel' and 'Seaxe' ('Saxons') ( Essex, Sussex and Wessex).

Chichester Cathedral

ChichestercathedralCathedral Church of the Holy Trinity
The county day, called Sussex Day, is celebrated on 16 June, the same day as the feast day of St Richard of Chichester, Sussex's patron saint, whose shrine at Chichester Cathedral was an important place of pilgrimage in the Middle Ages.
It is located in Chichester, in Sussex, United Kingdom.

Sussex County, Virginia

Sussex CountySussexVirginia
Three United States counties (in Delaware, New Jersey, and Virginia), and a former county/land division of Western Australia, are named after Sussex.
The county is named after the county of Sussex, England.

Essex

Essex, EnglandCounty of EssexEssex County
Essex, Middlesex and Wessex).
Middlesex, Sussex and Wessex) during the Heptarchy.

Sussex dialect

dialectspeech patternsSussaxon dialect
Sussex's motto, We wunt be druv, is a Sussex dialect expression meaning "we will not be pushed around" and reflects the traditionally independent nature of Sussex men and women.
The Sussex dialect is a dialect that was once widely spoken by those living in the historic county of Sussex in southern England.

Blackdown, West Sussex

BlackdownBlack DownBlackdown Hill
At 280m, Blackdown is the highest point in Sussex, or county top.
Blackdown, or Black Down, is the highest hill in the historic county of Sussex, at 280 metres (919 feet).

Coat of arms of Sussex

emblem of SussexCoat of armsheraldic shield of Sussex
Officially recognised by the Flag Institute on 20 May 2011, its design is based on the heraldic shield of Sussex.
A heraldic shield (often erroneously referred to as a coat of arms) has been associated with the historic county of Sussex since the seventeenth century.

Sussex County, Delaware

Sussex CountySussexDelaware
Three United States counties (in Delaware, New Jersey, and Virginia), and a former county/land division of Western Australia, are named after Sussex.
In 1682, English King Charles II awarded the Delaware territories to William Penn in settlement of family debts, and Penn reorganized all three Delaware counties: Deale County become Sussex County, and St. Jones County became Kent County, in recognition of Penn's homelands in Sussex County, England.

Weald

High WealdThe WealdLow Weald
North of this are the rolling chalk hills of the South Downs, beyond which is the well-wooded Sussex Weald.
It crosses the counties of Hampshire, Surrey, Sussex and Kent.

Selsey

Church NortonSelsey, West SussexIsle of the Seals
Selsey is known as a tornado hotspot, with small tornadoes hitting the town in 1986, 1998 and 2000, with the 1998 tornado causing an estimated £10 million of damage to 1,000 buildings.
Selsey lies at the southernmost point of the Manhood Peninsula, almost cut off from mainland Sussex by the sea.

We wunt be druv

Sussex's motto, We wunt be druv, is a Sussex dialect expression meaning "we will not be pushed around" and reflects the traditionally independent nature of Sussex men and women.
"We wunt be druv" is the unofficial county motto of Sussex in southern England.

Kent

Kent, EnglandCounty of KentCounty Kent
It is bounded to the west by Hampshire, north by Surrey, northeast by Kent, south by the English Channel, and divided for many purposes into the ceremonial counties of West Sussex and East Sussex.
These are the results of erosion of the Wealden dome, a dome across Kent and Sussex created by alpine movements 20–10 million years ago.

Sussex by the Sea

Good Old Sussex by the Sea
Sussex by the Sea is regarded as the unofficial anthem of Sussex; it was composed by William Ward-Higgs in 1907, perhaps originally from the lyrics of Rudyard Kipling's poem entitled Sussex.
"Sussex by the Sea" (also known as "A Horse Galloping") is a patriotic song written in 1907 by William Ward-Higgs, often considered to be the unofficial county anthem of Sussex.

Brighton main line

Brighton lineQuarry Linemain line
The exception to this pattern is the 20th century north-south development on the A23-Brighton line corridor, Sussex's main link to London.
The many Sussex services to Central London use the line and generally its branches as do south London, East Surrey and Tonbridge, Kent services.