The Swedish Empire at its height in 1658, with overseas possessions not shown
A Vendel-era helmet, at the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities
Sweden's coat of arms (with erroneous tinctures) on a wall of City Hall at Lützen in Germany
Viking expeditions (blue lines)
The Swedish Empire at its height in 1658, with overseas possessions not shown
The Tjängvide image stone dating from 800 to 1099, example of Viking art
The development of Sweden and its empire from 1560 to 1815
Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), a site of religious and political importance in the early days of Sweden
The Swedish Empire at its height in 1658, with overseas possessions not shown
Skog tapestry, made most probably during the late 13th century.
Triumph of King Charles X Gustav over the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, 1655
Gustav I liberated Sweden from Christian II of Denmark, ending the Kalmar Union. He established the House of Vasa which ruled Sweden and Poland until the 17th century
King Charles X Gustav
Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld in 1631.
King Charles XI
The Swedish Empire between 1611 and 1815, with its absolute peak between 1658 and 1660.
Charles XII
The Battle of Poltava in 1709. In the following years, Russia and her allies occupied all Swedish dominions on the Baltic coast and even Finland.
Swedish possessions in 1658. The years in parentheses indicate when the possession was given up or lost.
Illustration of starvation in northern Sweden, Famine of 1867–1869
Gustavus Adolphus.
Swedish emigrants boarding ship in Gothenburg in 1905
A Swedish soldier during World War II. Sweden remained neutral during the conflict.
Tage Erlander (left), Prime Minister under the ruling Swedish Social Democratic Party from 1946 to 1969.
Sweden joined the European Union in 1995 and signed the Lisbon Treaty in 2007.
Second day of the Stockholm Husby riots. The picture shows three cars on fire in the Stockholm suburb of Husby, 20 May 2013
View of the Stora Sjöfallet National Park
Scania in southern Sweden
Sandhamn island, Stockholm archipelago
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the 0°C isotherm
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the -3°C isotherm
Map of Sweden's five major vegetation zones
The current King of Sweden, Carl XVI Gustaf, and his consort, Queen Silvia
Rosenbad, in central Stockholm, has been the seat of the Government since 1981.
The Riksdag chamber, at the time of a vote, in 2009
The party leaders lined up before the start of the televised live debate on 12 September 2014.
Municipal divisions of Sweden
Kingdoms of Svear (Sweonas) and Götar (Geats) in the 12th century, with modern borders in grey
The Riksdag, the Swedish Parliament in 2014
Bonde Palace in Stockholm, seat of the Supreme Court of Sweden
The EU parliament in Brussels. Sweden is a member state of the European Union.
Development aid measured in GNI in 2009. Source: OECD. As a percentage Sweden is the largest donor.
The Saab JAS 39 Gripen is an advanced Swedish multi-role fighter aircraft of the Swedish Air Force.
The Infantry fighting vehicle CV90, which is produced and used by Sweden
Gross regional product (GRP) per capita in thousands of kronor (2014)
A proportional representation of Sweden exports, 2019
Sweden is home to Volvo Cars, an automobile company with its headquarters in Gothenburg
Real GDP growth in Sweden, 1996–2006
Sweden is part of the Schengen Area and the EU single market.
Nordstan is one of the largest shopping malls in northern Europe
Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, located south of Gothenburg
The Öresund Bridge between Malmö and Copenhagen in Denmark
Stockholm Central Station
Alfred Nobel, inventor of dynamite and institutor of the Nobel Prize
Population density in the counties of Sweden.
people/km²
Distribution of speakers of the Swedish language
The Protestant Katarina Church in Stockholm
The second oldest mosque in Sweden is the Malmö Mosque, inaugurated in 1984
Historical development of life expectancy in Sweden
Uppsala University (established 1477)
Nationalmuseum in Stockholm
The Swedish band ABBA in April 1974, a few days after they won the Eurovision Song Contest
Djurgårdsbron
Kalmar Cathedral
Headquarters of Sveriges Television in Stockholm
The writer and playwright August Strindberg
Walpurgis Night bonfire in Sweden
Cinnamon rolls originated in Sweden and Denmark.
Former World No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg
Former world No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg

Sweden is the only Nordic country to have ever reached the status of a military great power.

- Swedish Empire

When Sweden became involved in the Thirty Years' War on the Protestant side, an expansion of its territories began and eventually the Swedish Empire was formed.

- Sweden

6 related topics

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Nordic countries

The Nordic countries (also known as the Nordics or Norden; lit. 'the North') are a geographical and cultural region in Northern Europe and the North Atlantic.

The Nordic countries (also known as the Nordics or Norden; lit. 'the North') are a geographical and cultural region in Northern Europe and the North Atlantic.

Nordic flags
Effigy of Queen Margaret, founder and ruler of the Kalmar Union
Kalmar Union, c. 1400
Nordic prime ministers at the Nordic Council meeting in 2014 in Stockholm
Satellite map of the European part of the Nordic countries, except for Jan Mayen and Svalbard
The Öresund Bridge between Malmö in Sweden and Copenhagen in Denmark
Share of total area in the Nordic countries in 2012
The exclusive economic zones and territorial waters of the Kingdom of Denmark
Average temperatures in the capitals of the Nordic countries in 2012
Signing the Helsinki Treaty in 1962
Nordic Council in session at the Parliament of Norway in 2007
Vigdís Finnbogadóttir served as the fourth President of Iceland from 1980 to 1996 and was the world's first democratically elected female head of state
Copenhagen Central Station with S-Trains
GDP per capita of the Nordic sovereign states in USD from 1990 to 2017
Statfjord oil platform in Norway is owned and operated by Equinor, which is the largest company in the Nordic countries
The Port of Gothenburg is the largest port in the Nordic countries.
During the recent years, Denmark has invested heavily in windfarms
Population density map of the Nordic countries (1996)
Historical reenactment of a farmer wedding in Jomala, Åland
Sami man at Honningsvåg, Norway, wearing the traditional Gákti
Faroese folk dancers in national costumes
ABBA is one of the best-selling music artists of all time
Søren Kierkegaard is considered to be the first existentialist philosopher
Swedish author Astrid Lindgren together with Finnish author Tove Jansson in Stockholm in 1958
Flag of Åland
Nordic countries (orange and red) and Scandinavian countries (red)
The Barents Region
A satellite photograph of Northern Europe
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
The North Germanic languages in the Nordic countries
The Finnic languages in Northern Europe
The Sami languages in Northern Europe
Share of total population of the Nordic countries by country in January 2013
Life expectancy at birth in the Nordic countries in 2012
Marriages and divorces in the Nordic countries in 2012
Immigrants in the Nordic countries in 2012
{{flagicon|DEN}} Vilhelm Hammershøi
{{flagicon|FIN}} Helene Schjerfbeck
{{flagicon|ISL}} Þórarinn B. Þorláksson
{{flagicon|NOR}} Edvard Munch
{{flagicon|SWE}} August Strindberg
{{flagicon|FAR}} Díðrikur á Skarvanesi

It includes the sovereign states of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden; the autonomous territories of the Faroe Islands and Greenland; and the autonomous region of Åland.

The Thirty Years' War thus began the rise of Sweden as a great power, while it marked the start of decline for the Danish.

Swedish Pomerania

Swedish Pomerania (orange) within the Swedish Empire in 1658
Gustav II Adolf
Swedish Pomerania (orange) within the Swedish Empire in 1658
The former Duchy of Pomerania (center) partitioned between the Swedish Empire and Brandenburg after the Treaty of Stettin (1653). Swedish Pomerania ("West Pomerania") is indicated in blue, Brandenburgian Pomerania ("East Pomerania") is shown in orange.
Swedish Pomerania (centre-right) in 1812
Johann Joachim Spalding, 1800
portrait of Caspar David Friedrich, c.1810
Philipp Otto Runge
Kurt Christoph Graf von Schwerin
Lord Macleod

Swedish Pomerania (Svenska Pommern; Schwedisch-Pommern) was a Dominion under the Swedish Crown from 1630 to 1815, situated on what is now the Baltic coast of Germany and Poland.

The peace treaties were negotiated while the Swedish queen Christina was a minor, and the Swedish Empire was governed by members of the high aristocracy.

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Treaty of Roskilde

Concluded on 26 February or 8 March 1658 (NS) during the Second Northern War between Frederick III of Denmark–Norway and Karl X Gustav of Sweden in the Danish city of Roskilde.

Concluded on 26 February or 8 March 1658 (NS) during the Second Northern War between Frederick III of Denmark–Norway and Karl X Gustav of Sweden in the Danish city of Roskilde.

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The peace banquet (Fredstaffelet) at Frederiksborg Castle following the signing of the Treaty of Roskilde in 1658

The immediate cession of the Danish province Scania (Skåne) to Sweden.

The immediate cession of the Norwegian province of Bohuslän (Båhuslen) to Sweden. This effectively secured for Sweden unrestricted access to western trade.

Denmark–Norway

Early modern multi-national and multi-lingual real union consisting of the Kingdom of Denmark, the Kingdom of Norway (including the then Norwegian overseas possessions: the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, and other possessions), the Duchy of Schleswig, and the Duchy of Holstein.

Early modern multi-national and multi-lingual real union consisting of the Kingdom of Denmark, the Kingdom of Norway (including the then Norwegian overseas possessions: the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, and other possessions), the Duchy of Schleswig, and the Duchy of Holstein.

Map of Denmark–Norway, c. 1780
Denmark–Norway and its possessions, c. 1800
Map of Denmark–Norway, c. 1780
The Carta marina, an early map of the Nordic countries, made around the end of the Kalmar Union and the start of Denmark–Norway
Christian IV of Denmark
Naval battle between the frigate and Norwegian gunboats near Bergen in 1808

Denmark, Norway, and Sweden established and formed the Kalmar Union in 1397.

Thus the Thirty Years' War facilitated rise of Sweden as a great power, while it marked the start of decline for Denmark-Norway.

Battle of Narva 1700 by Daniel Stawert

Battle of Narva (1700)

Early battle in the Great Northern War.

Early battle in the Great Northern War.

Battle of Narva 1700 by Daniel Stawert
Map of the Battle of Narva. Russian forces are in green, while the Swedish forces are in yellow.
The Battle of Narva by Alexander Kotzebue.
Russian force surrendering to Charles
Russian memorial near Narva
Swedish Lion Monument in Narva

A Swedish relief army under Charles XII of Sweden defeated a Russian siege force three to four times its size.

Despite this shortcoming, Peter the Great of Russia was keen to get "an adequate opening to the Baltic" by conquering parts of Sweden's Baltic provinces Russia lost during the Time of Troubles.

Riga

Capital of Latvia and is home to 605,802 inhabitants (2022), which is a third of Latvia's population.

Capital of Latvia and is home to 605,802 inhabitants (2022), which is a third of Latvia's population.

The building of the Brotherhood of Blackheads is one of the most iconic buildings of Old Riga (Vecrīga).
Riga in the 16th century
Riga in 1650. Drawing by Johann Christoph Brotze
German troops entering Riga during World War I
"Baltische Post" was a German language newspaper in Riga during the early 20th century.
Damaged Riga Old Town and St. Peter's Church during the World War II
Flower laying ceremony at the Freedom Monument in 2012
Riga City Council
The Latvian National Opera
Riga Castle
Arena Riga, home to multiple sports clubs of Riga
Skonto Stadium
One of the several trolleybus types in Riga
A Škoda 15 T tram in Riga
Riga is a large hub in the Passenger Train network: commuter train frequency in 2016
Bank of Latvia
Riga Stock Exchange early 20th century. Now The Art Museum Riga Bourse
Alberta iela 13
Alberta iela 2a
Staircase of Alberta ielā 12
Aleksandra Čaka iela 26
Riga Art Nouveau Museum
Strēlnieku iela 4a

Sweden's northern dominance had ended, and Russia's emergence as the strongest Northern power was formalised through the Treaty of Nystad in 1721.

🇸🇪 Norrköping, Sweden