A report on Sweden

A Vendel-era helmet, at the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities
Viking expeditions (blue lines)
The Tjängvide image stone dating from 800 to 1099, example of Viking art
Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), a site of religious and political importance in the early days of Sweden
Skog tapestry, made most probably during the late 13th century.
Gustav I liberated Sweden from Christian II of Denmark, ending the Kalmar Union. He established the House of Vasa which ruled Sweden and Poland until the 17th century
Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld in 1631.
The Swedish Empire between 1611 and 1815, with its absolute peak between 1658 and 1660.
The Battle of Poltava in 1709. In the following years, Russia and her allies occupied all Swedish dominions on the Baltic coast and even Finland.
Illustration of starvation in northern Sweden, Famine of 1867–1869
Swedish emigrants boarding ship in Gothenburg in 1905
A Swedish soldier during World War II. Sweden remained neutral during the conflict.
Tage Erlander (left), Prime Minister under the ruling Swedish Social Democratic Party from 1946 to 1969.
Sweden joined the European Union in 1995 and signed the Lisbon Treaty in 2007.
Second day of the Stockholm Husby riots. The picture shows three cars on fire in the Stockholm suburb of Husby, 20 May 2013
View of the Stora Sjöfallet National Park
Scania in southern Sweden
Sandhamn island, Stockholm archipelago
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the 0°C isotherm
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the -3°C isotherm
Map of Sweden's five major vegetation zones
The current King of Sweden, Carl XVI Gustaf, and his consort, Queen Silvia
Rosenbad, in central Stockholm, has been the seat of the Government since 1981.
The Riksdag chamber, at the time of a vote, in 2009
The party leaders lined up before the start of the televised live debate on 12 September 2014.
Municipal divisions of Sweden
Kingdoms of Svear (Sweonas) and Götar (Geats) in the 12th century, with modern borders in grey
The Riksdag, the Swedish Parliament in 2014
Bonde Palace in Stockholm, seat of the Supreme Court of Sweden
The EU parliament in Brussels. Sweden is a member state of the European Union.
Development aid measured in GNI in 2009. Source: OECD. As a percentage Sweden is the largest donor.
The Saab JAS 39 Gripen is an advanced Swedish multi-role fighter aircraft of the Swedish Air Force.
The Infantry fighting vehicle CV90, which is produced and used by Sweden
Gross regional product (GRP) per capita in thousands of kronor (2014)
A proportional representation of Sweden exports, 2019
Sweden is home to Volvo Cars, an automobile company with its headquarters in Gothenburg
Real GDP growth in Sweden, 1996–2006
Sweden is part of the Schengen Area and the EU single market.
Nordstan is one of the largest shopping malls in northern Europe
Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, located south of Gothenburg
The Öresund Bridge between Malmö and Copenhagen in Denmark
Stockholm Central Station
Alfred Nobel, inventor of dynamite and institutor of the Nobel Prize
Population density in the counties of Sweden.
people/km²
Distribution of speakers of the Swedish language
The Protestant Katarina Church in Stockholm
The second oldest mosque in Sweden is the Malmö Mosque, inaugurated in 1984
Historical development of life expectancy in Sweden
Uppsala University (established 1477)
Nationalmuseum in Stockholm
The Swedish band ABBA in April 1974, a few days after they won the Eurovision Song Contest
Djurgårdsbron
Kalmar Cathedral
Headquarters of Sveriges Television in Stockholm
The writer and playwright August Strindberg
Walpurgis Night bonfire in Sweden
Cinnamon rolls originated in Sweden and Denmark.
Former World No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg
Former world No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg

Country in Northern Europe.

- Sweden

398 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Coat of Arms of the Swedish Armed Forces

Swedish Armed Forces

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Coat of Arms of the Swedish Armed Forces
The Swedish multirole fighter, the Saab JAS 39 Gripen.
The Infantry fighting vehicle CV 90 produced and used by Sweden.
NH90 of the Swedish Armed Forces
The Swedish Visby class corvette.
Chart showing the size of the Swedish Armed Forces 1965–2010. Yellow = number of air wings; Blue = number of infantry regiments; Red = number of artillery regiments; Green = number of coastal artillery and amphibious regiments.
Gen. Micael Bydén, the Supreme Commander of the Swedish Armed Forces.

The Swedish Armed Forces (Försvarsmakten, "the Defense Force") is the government agency that forms the armed forces of Sweden, tasked with the defense of the country as well as with promoting Sweden's wider interests, supporting international peacekeeping, and providing humanitarian aid.

Battle of Leipzig by Vladimir Moshkov

Battle of Leipzig

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Fought from 16 to 19 October 1813 at Leipzig, Saxony.

Fought from 16 to 19 October 1813 at Leipzig, Saxony.

Battle of Leipzig by Vladimir Moshkov
Battle of Leipzig by Vladimir Moshkov
Napoleon and Poniatowski at Leipzig, by January Suchodolski
Poniatowski's Last Charge at Leipzig, by Richard Caton Woodville
Overview of the battlefield
Actions as of October 16
French soldiers sparing the life of Russian soldier Leontiy Korennoy for his bravery
French infantry defending a barricade against a Prussian assault
Actions as of October 18
Troops of the 19th Hungarian Regiment engaging French infantry
French soldiers in skirmish with Bashkirs and Cossacks
Swedish troops assaulting Leipzig
Napoleon's retreat on 19 October 1813, showing the explosion of the bridge
Alexander I of Russia, Francis I of Austria, and Frederick William III of Prussia meeting after the battle
The Russian Army entering Paris, 1814
{{lang|de|Völkerschlachtdenkmal}}: Monument to the Battle of the Nations, completed in 1913
Jahrhunderthalle in Breslau (modern Wrocław in Poland), also completed in 1913

The Coalition armies of Austria, Prussia, Sweden, and Russia, led by Tsar Alexander I and Karl von Schwarzenberg, decisively defeated the Grande Armée of French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte.

Finnish soldiers at the VT-line of fortifications during the Soviet Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive in June 1944

Continuation War

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Conflict fought by Finland and Nazi Germany against the Soviet Union from 1941 to 1944, as part of World War II.

Conflict fought by Finland and Nazi Germany against the Soviet Union from 1941 to 1944, as part of World War II.

Finnish soldiers at the VT-line of fortifications during the Soviet Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive in June 1944
Finnish flags at half-mast in Helsinki on 13 March 1940 after the Moscow Peace Treaty became public
Vasilievsky Island in Saint Petersburg, pictured in 2017. During the Winter and Continuation Wars, Leningrad, as it was then known, was of strategic importance to both sides.
The geopolitical status in Europe in May 1941:Note how Finland is marked as a German ally.
Joachim von Ribbentrop (right) bidding farewell to Vyacheslav Molotov in Berlin on 14 November 1940 after discussing Finland's coming fate
Finnish, German and Soviet military formations at the start of the Continuation War in June and July 1941
A Bristol Blenheim bomber-aircraft belonging to the Finnish Air Force in March, 1944.
Finnish soldiers crossing the Murmansk railway in 1941
President Risto Ryti giving his famous radio speech about the Continuation War on June 26, 1941.
Subphases of the Finnish invasion of Karelia during the 1941 general offensive. The old 1939 border is marked in grey.
A Finnish military parade next to the Round Tower in Viipuri (now Vyborg, Russia) on 31 August 1941, celebrating its recapture
A Finnish soldier with a reindeer in Lapland. Reindeer were used in many capacities, such as pulling supply sleighs in snowy conditions.
Finnish soldiers crossing the 1940-agreed border (Moscow Peace Treaty) at Tohmajärvi on 12 July 1941, two days after the invasion started
A Soviet prisoner-of-war and a puppy pictured in August 1941 at Lupasalmi (Лубосалма) in Karelia
Finnish soldiers searching for remains of eventual victims at a burned-down house after a Soviet partisan attack on the village of Viianki, in Suomussalmi. The burnt bodies of over ten civilians, including women and children, were found.
The Soviets conducted four attacks in the first half of 1942, all of which were repelled by Finnish and German troops.
Keitel (left), Hitler, Mannerheim and Ryti meeting at Immola Airfield on 4 June 1942. Hitler made a surprise visit in honour of Mannerheim's 75th birthday and to discuss plans.
Soviet women having breakfast next to burning trash at a Finnish concentration camp in Petrozavodsk
Administrative map of Finland and occupied territories 1942–1944
Finnish soldiers in front of a field synagogue
Bombing destruction in Helsinki, the night of 6–7 February 1944.
Finnish soldiers carrying Panzerfäuste on their shoulders pass by the remains of a destroyed Soviet T-34 tank at the Battle of Tali-Ihantala
The front lines on 4 September 1944, when the ceasefire came into effect and two weeks before the war concluded
A Soviet (left) and a Finnish officer compare their watches on 4 September 1944 at Vyborg.
Areas ceded by Finland to the Soviet Union following the Moscow Armistice displayed in red
A memorial close to the Svir River in Russia with "The enemy was stopped here" ("Здесь был остановлен враг") written on it
A memorial stone in Utajärvi, Finland.

Finland sought security against further territorial depredations by the USSR and proposed mutual defence agreements with Norway and Sweden, but these initiatives were quashed by Moscow.

Speaker of the Riksdag

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The speaker of the Riksdag (Riksdagens talman) is the presiding officer of the national unicameral legislature in Sweden.

Karelians

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Today split between Finland and Russia.

Today split between Finland and Russia.

Old Karelian women in Sambatuksa (Sammatus), Russian Karelia.

This distinction historically arose from Karelia having been fought over and eventually split between Sweden and Novgorod, resulting in Karelians being under different cultural spheres.

The three lands of Sweden

Lands of Sweden

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The three lands of Sweden
The former lands of Sweden

The lands of Sweden (Sveriges landsdelar) are three traditional parts, each consisting of several provinces, in Sweden.

Grassalkovich Palace in Bratislava is the seat of the President of Slovakia.

Head of state

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Public persona who officially embodies a state in its unity and legitimacy.

Public persona who officially embodies a state in its unity and legitimacy.

Grassalkovich Palace in Bratislava is the seat of the President of Slovakia.
World's parliamentary states (as of 2022): Republics with an executive president elected by a parliament Parliamentary republics Parliamentary constitutional monarchies in which the monarch usually does not personally exercise power Presidential republics, one-party states, and other forms of government
Elizabeth II is the reigning monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and 14 other countries
Charles de Gaulle, President and head of state of the French Fifth Republic (1959–1969)
George Washington, the first president of the United States, set the precedent for an executive head of state in republican systems of government
George V, Emperor of India, and Empress Mary at the Delhi Durbar, 1911.
Tekiso Hati, ambassador of the Kingdom of Lesotho, presenting his credentials to Russian president Vladimir Putin
Daniel B. Shapiro, U.S. ambassador to Israel, presents his credentials to Israeli president Shimon Peres on 3 August 2011
A 1992 Letter of Credence, written in French, for the Czechoslovakian Ambassador to Lithuania, signed by the President of Czechoslovakia and addressed to his Lithuanian counterpart
Albert II, King of the Belgians inspecting troops on Belgium's national day in 2011
Nicolas Sarkozy, President of France and General Jean-Louis Georgelin, Chief of the Defence Staff, reviewing troops during the 2008 Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Élysées in Paris
Francis, from March 2013 the sovereign of the Vatican City State, an ex officio role of the Pope
Abdulmecid II is the 150th and last Caliph of Islam from Ottoman dynasty
Four generations of Danish kings in 1903: King Christian IX (left), Christian (X) (back), Frederick (VIII) (right), and Frederick (IX) (front)
The National Monument to Emperor Wilhelm I in Berlin, Germany, dedicated 1897, nearly 10 years after his death. The monument was destroyed by the communist government in 1950.
Title page of 1550 Italian edition of Machiavelli's The Prince
Bodin named on title page of Discorsi politici (1602) by Fabio Albergati who compared Bodin's political theories unfavourably with those of Aristotle
Frontispiece of Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan (1651)

3) The non-executive model, in which the head of state has either none or very limited executive powers, and mainly has a ceremonial and symbolic role (e.g. Sweden, Japan, Israel).

Stanislaus II Augustus

List of Polish monarchs

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Ruled at various times either by dukes and princes or by kings (11th to 18th centuries).

Ruled at various times either by dukes and princes or by kings (11th to 18th centuries).

Stanislaus II Augustus

King Sigismund III Vasa, a talented but somewhat despotic ruler, involved the country in many wars, which subsequently resulted in the successful capture of Moscow and the loss of Livonia to Sweden.

Hans Järta, the principal author of the Instrument of Government.

Instrument of Government (1809)

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Hans Järta, the principal author of the Instrument of Government.

The 1809 Instrument of Government (1809 års regeringsform), adopted on 6 June 1809 by the Riksdag of the Estates and King Charles XIII, was the constitution of the Kingdom of Sweden from 1809 to the end of 1974.

Location of Bornholm in Region Hovedstaden.

Bornholm

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Location of Bornholm in Region Hovedstaden.
Hammershus Ruin.
Windmill in Gudhjem, Bornholm
An 1877 windmill at Årsdale
Rønne, Bornholm.
Ferry routes to and from Bornholm
Bornholm and Christiansø hundreds and 5 municipalities (1970–2002) in green colour and 21 municipalities before 1 April 1970
Parishes in Church of Denmark numbered
Unofficial flag of Bornholm (the tourist flag).
Unofficial flag of Bornholm. Dannebrog is clearly visible with the green cross inserted in the white cross.
Old coat of arms of Bornholm.
Aerial view of Bornholm
Enlargeable, detailed map of Bornholm
Landsat satellite photo
Østerlars Church, one of Bornholm's four round churches
Ruins of Hammershus, a medieval fortress
Kristian Zahrtmann
Michael Ancher, self-portrait 1902
Vilhelm Herold as Lohengrin
Pia Ranslet
Hans Peter Kofoed
Magnus Cort

Bornholm is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea, to the east of the rest of Denmark, south of Sweden, northeast of Germany and north of Poland.