Sweden

A Vendel-era helmet, at the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities
Viking expeditions (blue lines)
The Tjängvide image stone dating from 800 to 1099, example of Viking art
Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), a site of religious and political importance in the early days of Sweden
Skog tapestry, made most probably during the late 13th century.
Gustav I liberated Sweden from Christian II of Denmark, ending the Kalmar Union. He established the House of Vasa which ruled Sweden and Poland until the 17th century
Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld in 1631.
The Swedish Empire between 1611 and 1815, with its absolute peak between 1658 and 1660.
The Battle of Poltava in 1709. In the following years, Russia and her allies occupied all Swedish dominions on the Baltic coast and even Finland.
Illustration of starvation in northern Sweden, Famine of 1867–1869
Swedish emigrants boarding ship in Gothenburg in 1905
A Swedish soldier during World War II. Sweden remained neutral during the conflict.
Tage Erlander (left), Prime Minister under the ruling Swedish Social Democratic Party from 1946 to 1969.
Sweden joined the European Union in 1995 and signed the Lisbon Treaty in 2007.
Second day of the Stockholm Husby riots. The picture shows three cars on fire in the Stockholm suburb of Husby, 20 May 2013
View of the Stora Sjöfallet National Park
Scania in southern Sweden
Sandhamn island, Stockholm archipelago
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the 0°C isotherm
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the -3°C isotherm
Map of Sweden's five major vegetation zones
The current King of Sweden, Carl XVI Gustaf, and his consort, Queen Silvia
Rosenbad, in central Stockholm, has been the seat of the Government since 1981.
The Riksdag chamber, at the time of a vote, in 2009
The party leaders lined up before the start of the televised live debate on 12 September 2014.
Municipal divisions of Sweden
Kingdoms of Svear (Sweonas) and Götar (Geats) in the 12th century, with modern borders in grey
The Riksdag, the Swedish Parliament in 2014
Bonde Palace in Stockholm, seat of the Supreme Court of Sweden
The EU parliament in Brussels. Sweden is a member state of the European Union.
Development aid measured in GNI in 2009. Source: OECD. As a percentage Sweden is the largest donor.
The Saab JAS 39 Gripen is an advanced Swedish multi-role fighter aircraft of the Swedish Air Force.
The Infantry fighting vehicle CV90, which is produced and used by Sweden
Gross regional product (GRP) per capita in thousands of kronor (2014)
A proportional representation of Sweden exports, 2019
Sweden is home to Volvo Cars, an automobile company with its headquarters in Gothenburg
Real GDP growth in Sweden, 1996–2006
Sweden is part of the Schengen Area and the EU single market.
Nordstan is one of the largest shopping malls in northern Europe
Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, located south of Gothenburg
The Öresund Bridge between Malmö and Copenhagen in Denmark
Stockholm Central Station
Alfred Nobel, inventor of dynamite and institutor of the Nobel Prize
Population density in the counties of Sweden.
people/km²
Distribution of speakers of the Swedish language
The Protestant Katarina Church in Stockholm
The second oldest mosque in Sweden is the Malmö Mosque, inaugurated in 1984
Historical development of life expectancy in Sweden
Uppsala University (established 1477)
Nationalmuseum in Stockholm
The Swedish band ABBA in April 1974, a few days after they won the Eurovision Song Contest
Djurgårdsbron
Kalmar Cathedral
Headquarters of Sveriges Television in Stockholm
The writer and playwright August Strindberg
Walpurgis Night bonfire in Sweden
Cinnamon rolls originated in Sweden and Denmark.
Former World No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg
Former world No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg

Nordic country in Northern Europe.

- Sweden

396 related topics

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Västergötland

Summertime agricultural landscape around Flo, south of Vänern. These plains are part of the geographical Central Swedish lowland and the geological Sub-Cambrian peneplain.
Husaby Church
Läckö Castle

Västergötland, also known as West Gothland or the Latinized version Westrogothia in older literature, is one of the 25 traditional non-administrative provinces of Sweden (landskap in Swedish), situated in the southwest of Sweden.

The House of Nobility, seat of the Swedish nobility.

Riksdag of the Estates

The House of Nobility, seat of the Swedish nobility.

Riksdag of the Estates (formally Riksens ständer; informally Ståndsriksdagen) was the name used for the Estates of Sweden when they were assembled.

Union between Sweden and Norway

Sweden–Norway in 1904
Jean Baptiste Bernadotte, Marshal of France, Crown Prince of Sweden in 1810 and Norway in 1814, and King of Sweden and Norway in 1818. Portrait by Joseph Nicolas Jouy, after François-Joseph Kinson
King Charles XIII (Charles II in Norway)
Christian Frederik, hereditary prince of Denmark and Norway, King of Norway May–October 1814, and King of Denmark (as Christian VIII) 1839–48. Portrait by Johan Ludwig Lund 1813
Count Johan Caspar Herman Wedel-Jarlsberg, who warned Christian Frederik
Oscar Wergeland: The Norwegian Constitutional Assembly in 1814
Christian Magnus Falsen, at 32, was credited as being the constitution's father.
Swedish Crown Prince Charles John (Bernadotte), who staunchly opposed Norwegian independence, only to offer generous terms of a union
Map of Norway and Sweden in 1847, by Peter Andreas Munch
King Charles XIV John (Charles III John in Norway). Portrait by Fredric Westin
Poster promoting Scandinavism between Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
King Oscar II
Swedish and Norwegian flags in 1899, after the removal of the union badge from the merchant flag of Norway
The peace monument of Karlstad was erected on the city square in 1955, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the dissolution of the union.
Norwegian soldiers at the border in September 1905. Photo by Narve Skarpmoen
State flag of Sweden (pre-1814–1815)
Flag of Norway (1814–1821)
Flag of Sweden and Norway (1818–1844)
State flag and naval ensign of Sweden and Norway (1815–1844)
Union naval jack and diplomatic flag (1844–1905)
Flag of Sweden (1844–1905)
Flag of Norway (1821–1844)
Flag of Norway (1844–1899)
Flag of Norway (1899–present)
State flag and naval ensign of Sweden (1844–1905)
Naval ensign of Norway (1844–1905) and state flag (1844–1899)
State flag of Norway (1899–present)
Royal standard in Sweden (1844–1905)
Royal standard in Norway (1844–1905)
Royal Swedish coat of arms (1814–1844)
Union and royal coat of arms (1844–1905)

Sweden and Norway or Sweden–Norway (Svensk-norska unionen; Den svensk-norske union(en)), officially the United Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway, and known as the United Kingdoms, was a personal union of the separate kingdoms of Sweden and Norway under a common monarch and common foreign policy that lasted from 1814 until its peaceful dissolution in 1905.

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Treaty of Roskilde

Concluded on 26 February or 8 March 1658 (NS) during the Second Northern War between Frederick III of Denmark–Norway and Karl X Gustav of Sweden in the Danish city of Roskilde.

Concluded on 26 February or 8 March 1658 (NS) during the Second Northern War between Frederick III of Denmark–Norway and Karl X Gustav of Sweden in the Danish city of Roskilde.

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The peace banquet (Fredstaffelet) at Frederiksborg Castle following the signing of the Treaty of Roskilde in 1658

The immediate cession of the Norwegian province of Bohuslän (Båhuslen) to Sweden. This effectively secured for Sweden unrestricted access to western trade.

Areas in Southern Sweden with a Finnish-speaking population (2005)

Finnish language

Uralic language of the Finnic branch, spoken by the majority of the population in Finland and by ethnic Finns outside of Finland.

Uralic language of the Finnic branch, spoken by the majority of the population in Finland and by ethnic Finns outside of Finland.

Areas in Southern Sweden with a Finnish-speaking population (2005)
Birch bark letter no. 292 is the oldest known document in any Finnic language.
Mikael Agricola, a 19th-century drawing by Albert Edelfelt
Elias Lönnrot as depicted in a 19th-century caricature – Lönnrot made several journeys to Karelia and Eastern Finland to collect folklore, from which he compiled the Kalevala.
Map of Finnish dialects and forms of speech
The Turku dialect is famous for its seemingly inverted questions. For example, "Ei me mittä kaffelle men?" looks like it means "So we don't go for coffees?" but actually means "Shall we go for coffees?"
A sign in Savonian dialect: "You don't get cognac here, but proper wheat made buns and good strong Juhla Mokka-brand coffee you will have. Welcome."
Example of a participle construction
Suomalaisen Sana-Lugun Coetus (1745) by Daniel Juslenius was the first comprehensive dictionary of the Finnish language with 16,000 entries.
The first page of Abckiria (1543), the first book written in the Finnish language. The spelling of Finnish in the book had many inconsistencies: for example, the sound could be represented by c, k or even g; the long u and the long i were represented by w and ij respectively, and ä was represented by e.

In Sweden, both Finnish and Meänkieli (which has significant mutual intelligibility with Finnish ) are official minority languages.

Kalmar Union

The Kalmar Union, c. 1400
The Kalmar Union, c. 1400

The Kalmar Union (Danish, Norwegian, and Kalmarunionen; Finnish: Kalmarin unioni; Unio Calmariensis) was a personal union in Scandinavia, agreed at Kalmar in Sweden, that from 1397 to 1523 joined under a single monarch the three kingdoms of Denmark, Sweden (then including most of present-day Finland), and Norway, together with Norway's overseas colonies (then including Iceland, Greenland, the Faroe Islands, and the Northern Isles of Orkney and Shetland).

Riga

Capital of Latvia and is home to 605,802 inhabitants (2022), which is a third of Latvia's population.

Capital of Latvia and is home to 605,802 inhabitants (2022), which is a third of Latvia's population.

The building of the Brotherhood of Blackheads is one of the most iconic buildings of Old Riga (Vecrīga).
Riga in the 16th century
Riga in 1650. Drawing by Johann Christoph Brotze
German troops entering Riga during World War I
"Baltische Post" was a German language newspaper in Riga during the early 20th century.
Damaged Riga Old Town and St. Peter's Church during the World War II
Flower laying ceremony at the Freedom Monument in 2012
Riga City Council
The Latvian National Opera
Riga Castle
Arena Riga, home to multiple sports clubs of Riga
Skonto Stadium
One of the several trolleybus types in Riga
A Škoda 15 T tram in Riga
Riga is a large hub in the Passenger Train network: commuter train frequency in 2016
Bank of Latvia
Riga Stock Exchange early 20th century. Now The Art Museum Riga Bourse
Alberta iela 13
Alberta iela 2a
Staircase of Alberta ielā 12
Aleksandra Čaka iela 26
Riga Art Nouveau Museum
Strēlnieku iela 4a

🇸🇪 Norrköping, Sweden

Sámi outside Lavvu, c. 1910

Sámi

Sámi outside Lavvu, c. 1910
A Sámi depicted in art, painting by François-Auguste Biard
Aleksander Lauréus's painting of the Sámi by the fire
Homeland of the Sámi people at present
A Sámi family in Norway around 1900
A Sámi man and child in Finnmark, Norway, circa 1900
Three Sámi women
Sámi people in Norway, 1928
A Sea Sámi man from Norway by Prince Roland Bonaparte in 1884
A Sea Sámi man from Norway by Prince Roland Bonaparte in 1884
Sámi family in 1936
Vindelfjällen
Suorvajaure near Piteå
Sámi man from Norway
Sámi Parliament of Norway
Mountain landscape in Kvalsund near Hammerfest
Sámi Parliament in Sweden
Land near Ylläs
Finnish Lapland. The three northernmost municipalities Utsjoki, Inari and Enontekiö and part of Sodankylä are officially considered the Sámi area.
Kildin Sami Map (green). СААМИ is "Sámi" in Cyrillic
National Culture Centre in Lovozero
Chibini massif, Kola Peninsula
The port of Murmansk in the Kola Bay
Krasnoshchelye village on the Ponoi River
Sámi knives
Beaded belt, knife, and antler needlecase
Sámi woman from Sweden
Sámi hats
Johan Turi's illustration of reindeer herding from his 1910 book Muitalus sámiid birra (An Account of the Sámi), the first book published in a Sámi language
Sara Marielle Gaup at Riddu Riđđu
Reindeer herding
Building in Ljungris, owned by the Sámi community and used especially for reindeer calf marking in the summer
Sámi people in Härjedalen (1790–1800), far south in the Sápmi area
Laponian area in Sápmi, UNESCO World Heritage Site
Kanevka, Ponoy River, Russia's Lovozersky District
Ájtte Museum of the Sámi people, Jokkmokk
Log cabin in Utsjoki
Sámi child, 1923
Sámi family at spring celebration
E.W. Borg alphabet book, published in 1859 in Finnish-Inari Sámi
Geographic distribution of the Sámi languages: Darkened area represents municipalities that recognize Sámi as an official language.
This map shows the geographic distribution of Sámi languages and offers some additional information, such as number of native Sámi speakers and locations of the Sámi parliaments.
Sámi traditional presentation in Lovozero, Kola Peninsula, Russia
Reindeer in Alaska
Sven-Roald Nystø, Aili Keskitalo and Ole Henrik Magga, the three first presidents of the Sámi Parliament of Norway
Land rights for grazing reindeer
Sámi flag
Copper etching (1767) by O.H. von Lode showing a noaidi with his meavrresgárri drum
A sermon at the 2004 Samiske kirkedager
Noaidi drum
Sámi mother with her children
Ad for an 1893/1894 ethnological exposition of Sámi in Hamburg-Saint Paul
Nils-Aslak Valkeapää, a Sámi writer, musician and artist from Finland
Agnete Johnsen
Nils Gaup, a Sámi film director from Norway
Anja Pärson a Sámi skier from Sweden
Börje Salming, a retired ice hockey defenceman

The Sámi (also spelled Sami or Saami) are a Finno-Ugric-speaking people inhabiting the region of Sápmi (formerly known as Lapland), which today encompasses large northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and of the Murmansk Oblast, Russia, most of the Kola Peninsula in particular.

Portrait by Émile Mascré, 1843

Charles XIV John

King of Sweden and Norway from 1818 until his death.

King of Sweden and Norway from 1818 until his death.

Portrait by Émile Mascré, 1843
Bernadotte's birthplace in Pau, France
Bust of a young Bernadotte at the Bernadotte Museum in Pau, France
Bernadotte as a Marshal of the Empire; copy of an 1804 portrait by François Kinson
Statue in Norrköping erected in 1846
Bernadotte as Crown Prince, painting by Fredric Westin
Coronation of Charles XIV John as King of Sweden in Stockholm Cathedral
Coronation of Charles III John as King of Norway in Nidaros Cathedral, Trondheim
Equestrian statue in Stockholm depicting Charles XIV John
The monument outside the Royal Palace in Oslo
Charles John on his deathbed
Charles John's porphyry sarcophagus

Sweden:

Sweden Democrats

Early sticker used by the Sweden Democrats with the slogan Bevara Sverige Svenskt ("Keep Sweden Swedish")
Jimmie Åkesson, interviewed before an SVT party-leader debate in 2014
Sweden Democrat supporters in Stockholm during the 2014 European elections
The party's share of the vote by municipality in 2010 (lighter shades indicate a higher percentage of votes) in which the Sweden Democrats performed particularly well in the southern province Scania
The party's share of the vote by municipality in 2018 (darker shades indicate a higher percentage of votes) in which the Sweden Democrats performed particularly well in the southern province Scania

The Sweden Democrats or Swedish Democrats (Sverigedemokraterna ; SD ) is a nationalist and right-wing populist political party in Sweden founded in 1988.