Sweden

A Vendel-era helmet, at the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities
Viking expeditions (blue lines)
The Tjängvide image stone dating from 800 to 1099, example of Viking art
Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), a site of religious and political importance in the early days of Sweden
Skog tapestry, made most probably during the late 13th century.
Gustav I liberated Sweden from Christian II of Denmark, ending the Kalmar Union. He established the House of Vasa which ruled Sweden and Poland until the 17th century
Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld in 1631.
The Swedish Empire between 1611 and 1815, with its absolute peak between 1658 and 1660.
The Battle of Poltava in 1709. In the following years, Russia and her allies occupied all Swedish dominions on the Baltic coast and even Finland.
Illustration of starvation in northern Sweden, Famine of 1867–1869
Swedish emigrants boarding ship in Gothenburg in 1905
A Swedish soldier during World War II. Sweden remained neutral during the conflict.
Tage Erlander (left), Prime Minister under the ruling Swedish Social Democratic Party from 1946 to 1969.
Sweden joined the European Union in 1995 and signed the Lisbon Treaty in 2007.
Second day of the Stockholm Husby riots. The picture shows three cars on fire in the Stockholm suburb of Husby, 20 May 2013
View of the Stora Sjöfallet National Park
Scania in southern Sweden
Sandhamn island, Stockholm archipelago
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the 0°C isotherm
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the -3°C isotherm
Map of Sweden's five major vegetation zones
The current King of Sweden, Carl XVI Gustaf, and his consort, Queen Silvia
Rosenbad, in central Stockholm, has been the seat of the Government since 1981.
The Riksdag chamber, at the time of a vote, in 2009
The party leaders lined up before the start of the televised live debate on 12 September 2014.
Municipal divisions of Sweden
Kingdoms of Svear (Sweonas) and Götar (Geats) in the 12th century, with modern borders in grey
The Riksdag, the Swedish Parliament in 2014
Bonde Palace in Stockholm, seat of the Supreme Court of Sweden
The EU parliament in Brussels. Sweden is a member state of the European Union.
Development aid measured in GNI in 2009. Source: OECD. As a percentage Sweden is the largest donor.
The Saab JAS 39 Gripen is an advanced Swedish multi-role fighter aircraft of the Swedish Air Force.
The Infantry fighting vehicle CV90, which is produced and used by Sweden
Gross regional product (GRP) per capita in thousands of kronor (2014)
A proportional representation of Sweden exports, 2019
Sweden is home to Volvo Cars, an automobile company with its headquarters in Gothenburg
Real GDP growth in Sweden, 1996–2006
Sweden is part of the Schengen Area and the EU single market.
Nordstan is one of the largest shopping malls in northern Europe
Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, located south of Gothenburg
The Öresund Bridge between Malmö and Copenhagen in Denmark
Stockholm Central Station
Alfred Nobel, inventor of dynamite and institutor of the Nobel Prize
Population density in the counties of Sweden.
people/km²
Distribution of speakers of the Swedish language
The Protestant Katarina Church in Stockholm
The second oldest mosque in Sweden is the Malmö Mosque, inaugurated in 1984
Historical development of life expectancy in Sweden
Uppsala University (established 1477)
Nationalmuseum in Stockholm
The Swedish band ABBA in April 1974, a few days after they won the Eurovision Song Contest
Djurgårdsbron
Kalmar Cathedral
Headquarters of Sveriges Television in Stockholm
The writer and playwright August Strindberg
Walpurgis Night bonfire in Sweden
Cinnamon rolls originated in Sweden and Denmark.
Former World No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg
Former world No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg

Nordic country in Northern Europe.

- Sweden

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Svealand

The historical four divisions of Swedish territory.
Svealand. Värmland was counted to Götaland until the 19th century, which is indicated on the map by a darker shade.

Svealand, Swealand is the historical core region of Sweden.

Anders Sunesøn's 13th-century version of the Scanian Law and Church Law, containing a comment in the margin called the "Skaaningestrof" (the Scanian stanza): "Hauí that skanunga ærliki mææn toco vithar oræt aldrigh æn." (Let it be known that Scanians are honorable men who have never tolerated injustice.)

Skåneland

Region on the southern Scandinavian peninsula.

Region on the southern Scandinavian peninsula.

Anders Sunesøn's 13th-century version of the Scanian Law and Church Law, containing a comment in the margin called the "Skaaningestrof" (the Scanian stanza): "Hauí that skanunga ærliki mææn toco vithar oræt aldrigh æn." (Let it be known that Scanians are honorable men who have never tolerated injustice.)
Painting by Swedish-German artist Johan Philip Lemke of the 1676 Battle of Lund during the Scanian War, the bloodiest battle ever fought between Denmark and Sweden
Map from 1710 of "Scaniae" (Skåneland), consisting of the provinces "Scania, Hallandia et Blekingia"
Today's Denmark and the former Danish provinces Southern Schleswig, Skåne, Halland and Blekinge.
Gustaf Otto Stenbock, Swedish field marshal

It includes the Swedish provinces of Blekinge, Halland and Scania.

Luther's rose seal, a symbol of Lutheranism

Lutheranism

One of the largest branches of Protestantism, identifying with the theology of Martin Luther, a 16th-century German monk and reformer whose efforts to reform the theology and practice of the Roman Catholic Church launched the Protestant Reformation.

One of the largest branches of Protestantism, identifying with the theology of Martin Luther, a 16th-century German monk and reformer whose efforts to reform the theology and practice of the Roman Catholic Church launched the Protestant Reformation.

Luther's rose seal, a symbol of Lutheranism
Martin Luther (1529) by Lucas Cranach the Elder
Title page of the Swedish Gustav Vasa Bible, translated by the Petri brothers, along with Laurentius Andreae
A Hundskirche replica
The University of Jena around 1600. Jena was the center of Gnesio-Lutheran activity during the controversies leading up to the Formula of Concord and afterwards was a center of Lutheran Orthodoxy.
Danish Queen Sophie Magdalene expressed her Pietist sentiment in 1737 by founding a Lutheran convent.
A nineteenth-century Haugean conventicle
The Olbers, one of the ships that carried Old Lutherans to the Western Hemisphere
Representing the continuation of the Finnish Awakening to the present, youth are confirmed at the site of Paavo Ruotsalainen's homestead.
Luther's translation of the Bible, from 1534
Moses and Elijah point the sinner looking for God's salvation to the cross to find it (Theology of the Cross).
Law and Grace, by Lucas Cranach the Elder. The left side shows humans' condemnation under God's law, while the right side presents God's grace in Christ.
Title page from the 1580 Dresden Book of Concord
Lutherans believe that whoever has faith in Jesus alone will receive salvation from the grace of God and will enter eternity in heaven instead of eternity in hell after death or at the second coming of Jesus.
Lutherans believe in the Trinity.
A.C. Article IX: Of Confession
Lutherans practice infant baptism.
Luther communing John the Steadfast
A.C. Article 18: Of Free Will
The Broad and the Narrow Way, a popular German Pietist painting, 1866
"Even though I am a sinner and deserving of death and hell, this shall nonetheless be my consolation and my victory that my Lord Jesus lives and has risen so that He, in the end, might rescue me from sin, death, and hell."—Luther
Luther composed hymns and hymn tunes, including "Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott" ("A Mighty Fortress Is Our God").
Divine Service at the St. Nicholas church in Luckau, Germany
Ukrainian Lutheran Church of the Cross of the Lord in Kremenets, which uses the Byzantine Rite
Christ Lutheran Church, Narsapur in India
Resurrection Lutheran School is a parochial school of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) in Rochester, Minnesota. The WELS school system is the fourth largest private school system in the United States.
Georg Calixtus taught at the University of Helmstedt during the Syncretistic controversy.
Stormtroopers holding German Christian propaganda during the church council elections on 23 July 1933 at St. Mary's Church, Berlin. After that, internal struggles, controversies, reorganization, and splits struck the German Evangelical Church.
LCMS pastor wearing a chasuble during communion
Confirmation in Lunder Church, Ringerike, Norway, 2012. The Church of Norway is a member of the Porvoo Communion, which means that these confirmands would be readily transferred into any Anglican church should they ever emigrate.
Læstadian lay preacher from Finnmark, Norway, 1898
Hallowed be Thy Name by Lucas Cranach the Elder illustrates a Lutheran pastor preaching Christ crucified. During the Reformation and afterwards, many churches did not have pews, so people would stand or sit on the floor. The elderly might be given a chair or stool.
Nathan Söderblom is ordained as archbishop of the Church of Sweden, 1914. Although the Swedish Lutherans boast of an unbroken line of ordinations going back prior to the Reformation, the bishops of Rome do not recognize such ordinations as valid.
Lutheran Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in St. Petersburg
Schwäbisch Hall Church Order, 1543
The Pennsylvania Ministerium published this 1803 hymnal.
Lighthouse Lutheran Church, an LCMC congregation in Freedom, Pennsylvania
A church of the Batak Protestant Church in Balige, Indonesia, a merged denomination that includes a Lutheran element
View of the altar and the pulpit in the Church of the Ascension in Jerusalem
Faith Lutheran School in Hong Kong
The coat of arms of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland
Countries with a member of the Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference as of 2013

Lutheranism is the largest religious group in Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Latvia, Namibia, and North Dakota and South Dakota in the United States.

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Sámi languages

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The Sami languages in Fennoscandia
Sami Primer, USSR 1933
A t-shirt for the Norwegian Labour Party. From top to bottom: Northern Saami, Lule Saami, and Southern Saami.
A trilingual road sign for Jokkmokk. From top to bottom: Swedish, Lule Saami, Northern Saami
A quadrilingual street sign in Inari in (from top to bottom) Finnish, Northern Saami, Inari Saami, and Skolt Saami. Inari is the only municipality in Finland with 4 official languages.
Sami speakers in Finland 1980-2010.

Sámi languages, in English also rendered as Sami and Saami, are a group of Uralic languages spoken by the Sámi people in Northern Europe (in parts of northern Finland, Norway, Sweden, and extreme northwestern Russia).

Lübeck

City in Northern Germany.

City in Northern Germany.

Lübeck as illustrated in the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493
Entry of the Fusilier battalion on June 18, 1871 in Lübeck.
Hospital of the Holy Spirit, one of the oldest social institutions of Lübeck (1260)
City hall
St. Mary's Church
Lübeck Cathedral and historic buildings at the Obertrave
Salzspeicher
Niederegger marzipan
The Lübeck Academy of Music
The skyline of the old town as seen from North
Lübeck main station (Lübeck Hbf)
Lübeck civil registration office, in the St. Jürgen zone
The beach of Travemünde
Lübeck Airport
Ephraim Carlebach 1936
Willy Brandt in 1980
JF Overbeck, self portrait with family 1820
Dieterich Buxtehude
Robert Christian Ave-Lallemant in 1851
Heinrich (left) and Thomas Mann in 1902
C.F.Heineken 1726

🇸🇪 Gotland, Sweden (1999)

View from Kinnekulle

Vänern

View from Kinnekulle
Satellite image of Vänern

Vänern (, also , ) is the largest lake in Sweden, the largest lake in the European Union and the third-largest lake of all Europe after Ladoga and Onega in Russia.

Viking Age picture stone, Gotland, Sweden.

Viking Age

The period during the Middle Ages when Norsemen known as Vikings undertook large-scale raiding, colonizing, conquest, and trading throughout Europe and reached North America.

The period during the Middle Ages when Norsemen known as Vikings undertook large-scale raiding, colonizing, conquest, and trading throughout Europe and reached North America.

Viking Age picture stone, Gotland, Sweden.
Viking voyages in the North Atlantic
Viking expansion in Europe between the 8th and 11th centuries: The yellow colour corresponds to the expansion of the Normans, only partly descending from the Vikings
Viking-era towns of Scandinavia
Viking expeditions (blue line): depicting the immense breadth of their voyages through most of Europe, the Mediterranean Sea, Northern Africa, Asia Minor, the Arctic, and North America. Lower Normandy, depicted as a ″Viking territory in 911″, was not part of the lands granted by the king of the Franks to Rollo in 911, but Upper Normandy.
Anglo-Saxon-Viking coin weight, used for trading bullion and hacksilver: Material is lead and weighs around 36 g. It is embedded with an Anglo-Saxon sceat (Series K type 32a) dating to 720–750 and minted in Kent. It is edged in a dotted triangle pattern. Origin is the Danelaw region and dates to 870–930.
"Irishmen oppose the landing of the Viking fleet", a painting in Dublin City Hall by James Ward (c.1914).
The Iru Fort in Northern Estonia
Longship on Tjängvide image stone, Sweden 800–1099.
Stone ships at Altes Lager Menzlin
Statue in Catoira, Galicia, commemorating the Viking invasions
The last written records of the Norse Greenlanders are from a 1408 marriage in the Church of Hvalsey.
Modern replica of a Viking longship
A typical fortified Viking town. This is a model of the town of Aros about 950. The town is now known as Aarhus
The fortified Viking Age town of Aros

Voyaging by sea from their homelands in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, the Norse people settled in the British Isles, Ireland, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, Normandy, and the Baltic coast and along the Dnieper and Volga trade routes in eastern Europe, where they were also known as Varangians.

Turku

City and former capital on the southwest coast of Finland at the mouth of the Aura River, in the region of Finland Proper (Varsinais-Suomi) and the former Turku and Pori Province (Turun ja Porin lääni; 1634–1997).

City and former capital on the southwest coast of Finland at the mouth of the Aura River, in the region of Finland Proper (Varsinais-Suomi) and the former Turku and Pori Province (Turun ja Porin lääni; 1634–1997).

Turku Cathedral, 1814, prior to the Great Fire in 1827
Great Fire of Turku, a painting by R. W. Ekman
A daguerreotype photograph of the Nobel House, the first photograph taken in Finland, from 1842
Aurakatu area in the 1910s
Aura River seen further away from central Turku
IV District, or Martti, is one of the smallest but most densely populated districts of Turku.
Area of Turku cathedral in autumn.
People celebrating Vappu in central Turku
MS Oasis of the Seas, formerly the world's largest passenger ship, was built in Turku.
Traditional Medieval Market of Turku in summer 2006.
Turku Cathedral, one of the most notable historical buildings in Finland.
Paavo Nurmi Marathon is run every summer.
The Turku Court of Appeal and Academy House of Turku
Turku City Hall, on the west side of the Aura River
Locomotives at Turku Central railway station
Viking Line's M/S Viking Grace on her in the Turku Archipelago.
VR Class Hv1 steam locomotive at Turku railway station in the 1920s
The main building of the University of Turku
Turku Main Library
President Mauno Koivisto

Turku is the oldest city in Finland, and served as the most important city of the eastern part of the Kingdom of Sweden (modern-day Finland).

The Lingsberg Runestone, Sweden, known as U 240

Runestone

Typically a raised stone with a runic inscription, but the term can also be applied to inscriptions on boulders and on bedrock.

Typically a raised stone with a runic inscription, but the term can also be applied to inscriptions on boulders and on bedrock.

The Lingsberg Runestone, Sweden, known as U 240
An early runestone: the Möjbro Runestone from Hagby (first placed near Möjebro), Uppland, Sweden. As with other early runic inscriptions, (e.g. Kylver Stone from about 300–400 CE) this is written from right to left, while later Runestones were written from left to right. The text is "Frawaradaz anahaha is laginaz".
The Snoldelev stone, one of the oldest runestones in Denmark
Distribution of runestones in Sweden, the country with the highest density. Runestones / 100 km2:
The Stenkvista runestone in Södermanland, Sweden, shows Thor's lightning hammer instead of a cross. Only two such runestones are known.
The Mask Stone (DR 66) found in Aarhus, Denmark commemorates a battle between two kings and features a stylized depiction of a mask.
Piraeus Lion drawing of curved lindworm. The runes on the lion tell of Swedish warriors, most likely Varangians, mercenaries in the service of the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Emperor.
The Kälvesten Runestone, Sweden
The Djulafors Runestone, Sweden
The Yttergärde Runestone, Sweden
The Valleberga Runestone, Sweden, reports that two Vikings had died in London.
Modern runestone on Adelsö near Stockholm, Sweden
A drawing of the Ramsund inscription, in the province of Södermanland, Sweden
Odin attacked by Fenrir on the Ledberg stone, Sweden
A runestone from the church of Resmo on Öland has been repainted. It is presently at the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm.
The Jelling stones which triggered the great runestone trend in Scandinavia{{According to whom|date=November 2015}}
The Kingittorsuaq Runestone from Greenland
Runestone from Tirsted in the National Museum of Denmark
Runestone from Tirsted drawing from 1765

The vast majority of runestones are found in Sweden.

Carl Gustaf in May 2018

Carl XVI Gustaf

King of Sweden.

King of Sweden.

Carl Gustaf in May 2018
The 15-year-old Crown Prince of Sweden looks at the recently recovered 17th-century warship Vasa in 1961.
The King and Queen of Sweden welcomed at the Kremlin by Russian President Vladimir Putin and his wife Lyudmila at the start of the King's state visit to Russia, 8 October 2001.
Royal monogram
A new Swedish double duchy was created for Princess Madeleine (left) in 1982, whereas her husband in 2013 declined to become a Swedish citizen, prince, and duke and is called Herr Christopher O'Neill in Sweden
King Carl XVI Gustaf with Queen Silvia at the royal wedding of their daughter Victoria

🇸🇪 Sweden: Recipient of the 90th Birthday Medal of King Gustaf V