Sweepstake

sweepstakesprize draw$weepstake$contestprize drawscontestsdrawgiving awayprize giveawaysSweepstakes Draw
A sweepstake is a type of contest where a prize or prizes may be awarded to a winner or winners.wikipedia
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Publishers Clearing House

Publisher's Clearing HousePublisher's clearinghouse Search and WinPublishers Clearing House Sweepstakes
Firms that rely on sweepstakes for attracting customers, such as Publishers Clearing House and Reader's Digest, have also found that the more involved the entry process, the more entrants. Among the most popularly known sweepstakes in the United States were the American Family Publishers Sweepstakes (now defunct), Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes, and Reader's Digest Sweepstakes, each of which strongly persuaded entrants to purchase magazine subscriptions by placing stickers on contest entry cardstock while promising multimillion-dollar (annuity) winners who will be "announced on TV".
Publishers Clearing House (PCH) is a direct marketing company that markets merchandise and magazine subscriptions with sweepstakes and prize-based games.

Lottery

lotterieslottery ticketLotto
Sweepstakes with an entry fee are considered in the UK to be lotteries under the Gambling Act 2005.
Though lotteries were common in the United States and some other countries during the 19th century, by the beginning of the 20th century, most forms of gambling, including lotteries and sweepstakes, were illegal in the U.S. and most of Europe as well as many other countries.

Competition

competitorcompetitionscompetitive
In Australia, a sweepstake is known as a competition, however the technical name for a consumer competition is a trade promotion lottery.
In Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, competitions or lottos are the equivalent of what are commonly known as sweepstakes in the United States.

American Family Publishers

American Family Publishers SweepstakesStop sending me all your damn mail.
Among the most popularly known sweepstakes in the United States were the American Family Publishers Sweepstakes (now defunct), Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes, and Reader's Digest Sweepstakes, each of which strongly persuaded entrants to purchase magazine subscriptions by placing stickers on contest entry cardstock while promising multimillion-dollar (annuity) winners who will be "announced on TV".
It is best known for running sweepstakes in which a large amount of money was offered as the grand prize (in a range of several hundred thousand to one or more million dollars).

Federal Trade Commission

FTCU.S. Federal Trade CommissionUnited States Federal Trade Commission
In response, the FCC and FTC refined U.S. broadcasting laws (creating the anti-lottery laws). The U.S. Federal Trade Commission exercises some authority over sweepstakes promotion and sweepstakes scams in the United States.

Sweepstakes parlor

Sweepstakes parlors, which began to appear in the US around 2005, are establishments that offer chances to win cash prizes as a promotion for a product, usually either a telephone card or Internet access.
Operators and the companies that provide the systems used maintain that they operate in accordance with laws governing promotions and sweepstakes, but critics of sweepstakes parlors have argued that these establishments are designed to exploit technicalities to skirt gambling laws, and that their patrons are more interested in using the facilities for gambling than actually using the services that they had purchased.

Scratchcard

scratch-offscratch ticketsscratch cards
Many state lotteries also run second-chance sweepstakes in conjunction with the retail sale of state lottery scratch cards in an effort to increase consumer demand for scratch cards and help control the litter caused by the improper disposal of non-winning lottery tickets.
Many state lotteries also run a second-chance sweepstakes in conjunction with the retail sale of state lottery scratchcards in an effort to increase consumer demand for scratchcards and to help control the litter problems associated with the improper disposal of non-winning lottery tickets.

Federal Communications Commission

FCCU.S. Federal Communications CommissionFederal Communications Commission (FCC)
In response, the FCC and FTC refined U.S. broadcasting laws (creating the anti-lottery laws).

Reader's Digest

Readers DigestReader’s DigestThe Reader's Digest
Firms that rely on sweepstakes for attracting customers, such as Publishers Clearing House and Reader's Digest, have also found that the more involved the entry process, the more entrants. Among the most popularly known sweepstakes in the United States were the American Family Publishers Sweepstakes (now defunct), Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes, and Reader's Digest Sweepstakes, each of which strongly persuaded entrants to purchase magazine subscriptions by placing stickers on contest entry cardstock while promising multimillion-dollar (annuity) winners who will be "announced on TV".

Confidence trick

con artistcon manscam
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission exercises some authority over sweepstakes promotion and sweepstakes scams in the United States.

Gambling

gamblerbettinggaming
Notably, sweepstakes in Canada, Australia, and several European countries require entrants to solve an elementary-school-level mathematical puzzle or answer a fairly simple knowledge question or solve a trivial fill-in-the-blanks guessing competition, making it (in theory, at least) a contest of skill in order to overcome requirements that would classify sweepstakes as a form of gambling under their country's legal definition.

Gambling Act 2005

2005 Gambling ActGambling (Licensing & Advertising) Act 2014Gambling Act
Sweepstakes with an entry fee are considered in the UK to be lotteries under the Gambling Act 2005. In the UK, prize competitions and prize draws are free of statutory control under the Gambling Act 2005 but should follow the CAP Code.

Irish Hospitals' Sweepstake

Irish SweepstakesIrish Free State Hospitals' SweepstakeIrish Sweepstake
The popularity of the term "sweepstakes" may derive from the Irish Sweepstakes, which were very popular from the 1930s to the 1980s.

Grand National

Grand National SteeplechaseThe Grand NationalEnglish Grand National
There is a tradition of office sweepstakes (known as office pools in the U.S.), which are usually based on major sporting events such as the Grand National and the World Cup.

FIFA World Cup

World CupWorld CupsFootball World Cup
There is a tradition of office sweepstakes (known as office pools in the U.S.), which are usually based on major sporting events such as the Grand National and the World Cup.

CAP Code

BCAP codecode of advertising practiceUK Code of Broadcast Advertising
In the UK, prize competitions and prize draws are free of statutory control under the Gambling Act 2005 but should follow the CAP Code.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In the United States, sweepstake sponsors are very careful to disassociate themselves from any suggestion that players must pay to enter, or pay to win, since this would constitute gambling.

Prize

consolation prizeprizesGrand Prix
Sweepstakes typically involve enticements to enter a consumer promotion with prizes that range from substantial wins such as cars or large sums of money to smaller prizes that are currently popular with consumers.

Advertising campaign

ad campaigncampaignadvertising campaigns
There should be no monetary cost to the entrant (although some sweepstakes require entrants to subscribe to a promotional mailing list, potentially exposing the entrant to an increase in junk mail, spam email, or telemarketing calls) and sweepstakes winners should also not be required to pay any kind of fee to receive their prizes.

Advertising mail

direct mailjunk maildirect-mail
There should be no monetary cost to the entrant (although some sweepstakes require entrants to subscribe to a promotional mailing list, potentially exposing the entrant to an increase in junk mail, spam email, or telemarketing calls) and sweepstakes winners should also not be required to pay any kind of fee to receive their prizes.

Email spam

spame-mail spamspam email
There should be no monetary cost to the entrant (although some sweepstakes require entrants to subscribe to a promotional mailing list, potentially exposing the entrant to an increase in junk mail, spam email, or telemarketing calls) and sweepstakes winners should also not be required to pay any kind of fee to receive their prizes.

Telemarketing

telemarketertelemarketerstelesales
There should be no monetary cost to the entrant (although some sweepstakes require entrants to subscribe to a promotional mailing list, potentially exposing the entrant to an increase in junk mail, spam email, or telemarketing calls) and sweepstakes winners should also not be required to pay any kind of fee to receive their prizes.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
Most corporate-sponsored sweepstakes promoted in the United States limit entry to US citizens, although some allow entry by legal residents of both the United States and Canada.

Magazine

magazinesquarterlyjournal
Among the most popularly known sweepstakes in the United States were the American Family Publishers Sweepstakes (now defunct), Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes, and Reader's Digest Sweepstakes, each of which strongly persuaded entrants to purchase magazine subscriptions by placing stickers on contest entry cardstock while promising multimillion-dollar (annuity) winners who will be "announced on TV".

Annuity (American)

annuitiesannuityAnnuities under American law
Among the most popularly known sweepstakes in the United States were the American Family Publishers Sweepstakes (now defunct), Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes, and Reader's Digest Sweepstakes, each of which strongly persuaded entrants to purchase magazine subscriptions by placing stickers on contest entry cardstock while promising multimillion-dollar (annuity) winners who will be "announced on TV".