Sweet potato

sweet potatoesIpomoea batataskumarakūmaracamotebatatayamsweetpotatoyamsBoniato
The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, Convolvulaceae.wikipedia
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Convolvulaceae

morning glory familyConvulvulaceaebindweed
The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, Convolvulaceae.
Convolvulaceae, known commonly as the bindweed or morning glory family, is a family of about 60 genera and more than 1,650 species of mostly herbaceous vines, but also trees, shrubs and herbs, and also including the sweet potato and a few other food tubers.

Potato

potatoesSolanum tuberosumIrish potato
The sweet potato is commonly thought to be a type of potato (Solanum tuberosum) but does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.
The Royal Spanish Academy says the Spanish word is a hybrid of the Taíno batata ('sweet potato') and the Quechua papa ('potato').

Yam (vegetable)

yamyamsñame
The sweet potato, especially the orange variety, is often called a "yam" in parts of North America, but is botanically very distinct from true yams. Although the soft, orange sweet potato is often called a "yam" in parts of North America, the sweet potato is very distinct from the botanical yam (Dioscorea), which has a cosmopolitan distribution, and belongs to the monocot family Dioscoreaceae.
D. alata, called "white yam", winged yam, water yam, and purple yam (not to be confused with the Okinawan purple "yam", which is a sweet potato), was first cultivated in Southeast Asia.

Yam

Yam (disambiguation)yams
Although the soft, orange sweet potato is often called a "yam" in parts of North America, the sweet potato is very distinct from the botanical yam (Dioscorea), which has a cosmopolitan distribution, and belongs to the monocot family Dioscoreaceae.

Batata

Later explorers found many cultivars under an assortment of local names, but the name which stayed was the indigenous Taino name of batata.
Batata is the word for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) in many languages (e.g. Spanish, Hebrew, Egyptian Arabic, and Sanger), originally from the Taíno batata (see Sweet potato → Names).

Tuber

tuberstuberoustuberous roots
Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable.
Some sources also treat modified lateral roots (root tubers) under the definition; these are found in sweet potatos, cassava, and dahlias.

Māori culture

MāoriMaoriculture
In New Zealand, the original Māori varieties bore elongated tubers with white skin and a whitish flesh (which, it is thought, points to pre-European cross-Pacific travel).
Many edible plants were brought from the home islands and of these kūmara (sweet potato) was to become the most important.

Columbian exchange

The Grand Exchangeintroducedoccurred with the discovery of the New World
The sweet potato arrived in Europe with the Columbian exchange.
16th-century Spanish colonizers introduced new staple crops to Asia from the Americas, including maize and sweet potatoes, and thereby contributed to population growth in Asia.

Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact theories

Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contactPre-Columbian Africa-Americas contact theoriesalternative theories
In Peru, the Quechua name for a type of sweet potato is kumar, strikingly similar to the Polynesian name kumara and its regional Oceanic cognates (kumala, umala, 'uala, etc.), which has led some scholars to suspect an instance of pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact.
The sweet potato, a food crop native to the Americas, was widespread in Polynesia by the time European explorers first reached the Pacific.

Sweet potato storage

storage
In the Southeastern United States, sweet potatoes are traditionally cured to improve storage, flavor, and nutrition, and to allow wounds on the periderm of the harvested root to heal.
The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a very important crop for subsistence farmers in Africa and other developing countries.

Starch

starcheswheat starchrice starch
Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable.
Many other starchy foods are grown, some only in specific climates, including acorns, arrowroot, arracacha, bananas, barley, breadfruit, buckwheat, canna, colocasia, katakuri, kudzu, malanga, millet, oats, oca, polynesian arrowroot, sago, sorghum, sweet potatoes, rye, taro, chestnuts, water chestnuts and yams, and many kinds of beans, such as favas, lentils, mung beans, peas, and chickpeas.

Mexico

MexicanMéxicoMEX
In Mexico, Peru, Chile, Central America, and the Philippines, the sweet potato is known as camote (alternatively spelled kamote in the Philippines), derived from the Nahuatl word camotli.
Some of Mexico's native culinary ingredients include: chocolate, avocado, tomato, maize, vanilla, guava, chayote, epazote, camote, jícama, nopal, zucchini, tejocote, huitlacoche, sapote, mamey sapote, many varieties of beans, and an even greater variety of chiles, such as the habanero and the jalapeño.

Taíno

TainoTaínosTaíno people
Later explorers found many cultivars under an assortment of local names, but the name which stayed was the indigenous Taino name of batata.
Batata (sweet potato) was the next most important root crop.

Polynesia

South SeasSouth Sea IslandsPolynesian Islands
A different crop plant, the oca (Oxalis tuberosa, a species of wood sorrel), is called a "yam" in many parts of Polynesia, including New Zealand.
The sweet potato, called kūmara in Māori and kumar in Quechua, is native to the Americas and was widespread in Polynesia when Europeans first reached the Pacific.

Solanales

PolemonialesSolananaeSolaniflorae
The sweet potato is commonly thought to be a type of potato (Solanum tuberosum) but does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.

Annual plant

annualannualsannual plants
With care, early-maturing cultivars can be grown as an annual summer crop in temperate areas, such as the Eastern United States and China.
Tomato, sweet potato and bell pepper are tender perennials usually grown as annuals.

Fujian

Fujian ProvinceFukienHokkien
It was introduced to the Fujian province of China in about 1594 from Luzon, in response to a major crop failure.
Rice is the main crop, supplemented by sweet potatoes and wheat and barley.

Staple food

staplestaplesstaple crop
The table below presents the relative performance of sweet potato (in column ) to other staple foods.
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, and sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.

Morning glory

morning gloriescoast morning gloryflower
The genus Ipomoea that contains the sweet potato also includes several garden flowers called morning glories, though that term is not usually extended to Ipomoea batatas.
The genus Ipomoea also contains the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

Elinor Fettiplace's Receipt Book

book of Receipts
It is recorded, for example, in Elinor Fettiplace's Receipt Book, compiled in England in 1604.
New ingredients such as the sweet potato appear.

List of root vegetables

root vegetableroot vegetablesroot crops
Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable.

Shōchū

shochu(shō)chūimojōchū
Shōchū, a Japanese spirit normally made from the fermentation of rice, can also be made from sweet potato, in which case it is called imo-jōchū.
It is typically distilled from rice (kome), barley (mugi), sweet potatoes (satsuma-imo), buckwheat (soba), or brown sugar (kokutō), though it is sometimes produced from other ingredients such as chestnut, sesame seeds, potatoes or even carrots.

Dominican Republic

DominicanDOMDominicans
In Argentina, Venezuela, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic the sweet potato is called batata.
Other favorite Dominican foods include chicharrón, yuca, casabe, pastelitos (empanadas), batata, yam, pasteles en hoja, chimichurris, and tostones.

Carotenoid

carotenoidscarotinoidketo-carotenoid
Besides simple starches, raw sweet potatoes are rich in complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber and beta-carotene (a provitamin A carotenoid), with moderate contents of other micronutrients, including vitamin B 5, vitamin B 6 and manganese (table).
Beta-carotene, found in pumpkins, sweet potato, carrots and winter squash, is responsible for their orange-yellow colors.

Roasted sweet potato

Gungogumayaki-imo
In East Asia, roasted sweet potatoes are popular street food.
In China, yellow-fleshed sweet potatoes are roasted in a large iron drum and sold as street food during winter.