Sweet v Parsley

Sweet v Parsley was an English criminal law case where the defendant landlady of a farmhouse (which was let to students and which she visited infrequently) was charged under a 1965 Act "of having been concerned in the management of premises used for smoking cannabis".wikipedia
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English criminal law

criminal lawcriminalcrime
Sweet v Parsley was an English criminal law case where the defendant landlady of a farmhouse (which was let to students and which she visited infrequently) was charged under a 1965 Act "of having been concerned in the management of premises used for smoking cannabis".

Strict liability (criminal)

strict liabilitycriminal liabilitystrict
The case's significance in English criminal law is that it sets out new set guidelines for determining whether an offence is one of strict liability or whether mens rea is a presumed requirement.

English law

English common lawEnglishEngland and Wales
Sweet v Parsley was an English criminal law case where the defendant landlady of a farmhouse (which was let to students and which she visited infrequently) was charged under a 1965 Act "of having been concerned in the management of premises used for smoking cannabis".

Judicial functions of the House of Lords

House of LordsAppellate Committee of the House of LordsLaw Lords
This conviction was later quashed by the House of Lords on the grounds that knowledge of the use of the premises was essential to the offence.

Mens rea

intentmental statemental element
That means that whenever a section is silent as to mens rea there is a presumption that, in order to give effect to the will of Parliament, we must read in words appropriate to require mens rea.

Rose Heilbron

Dame Rose Heilbron
She led in several other important cases, included Ormrod v Crossville Motor Services on vicarious liability in 1953, and Sweet v Parsley on the presumption of a requirement for mens rea in criminal offences in 1970.

Negligence per se

negligence ''per sepresumption of negligenceof negligence
The criminal law case of Sweet v Parsley (which required mens rea to be read into a criminal statue) follows this trend.

Strict liability

strictstrictly liableno-fault system
In the English case of Sweet v Parsley 1970, it was held that where a statute creating a crime made no reference to intention, then mens rea would be imputed by the court, so that the crime would not be one of strict liability.