Syagrius

Syagrius (430 – 486 or 487) was the last Gallic military commander of a Roman rump state in northern Gaul, now called the Kingdom of Soissons.wikipedia
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King of the Romans

German kingKingking of Germany
Gregory of Tours referred to him as King of the Romans.
King of the Romans (Rex Romanorum; König der Römer) was a title used by Syagrius, then by the German king following his election by the princes from the time of Emperor Henry II (1014–1024) onward.

Kingdom of Soissons

Domain of SoissonsSoissonsKingdom of Syagrius
Syagrius (430 – 486 or 487) was the last Gallic military commander of a Roman rump state in northern Gaul, now called the Kingdom of Soissons.
The rulers of the rump state, notably its final ruler Syagrius, were referred to as "Kings of the Romans" (Latin: rex Romanorum) by the Germanic peoples surrounding Soissons, with the polity itself being identified as the Regnum Romanorum, "Kingdom of the Romans", by the Visigothic historian Gregory of Tours.

Clovis I

ClovisKing ClovisChlodovech
Syagrius's defeat by king Clovis I of the Franks is considered the end of Western Roman rule outside of Italy. Syagrius governed this Gallo-Roman enclave from the death of his father in 464 until 486, when he was defeated in battle by Clovis I.
In what is now northern France, then northern Gaul, he took control of a rump state of the Western Roman Empire controlled by Syagrius at the Battle of Soissons (486), and by the time of his death in either 511 or 513, he had also conquered smaller Frankish kingdoms towards the northeast, the Alemanni to the east, and Visigothic kingdom of Aquitania to the south.

Aegidius

He inherited his position from his father, Aegidius, the last Roman magister militum per Gallias.
After his death he was succeeded by his son Syagrius, who would be the second and last ruler of the Kingdom of Soissons.

Soissons

Abbey of Saint-MédardDiocese of SoissonsSoissonnais
Syagrius preserved his father's territory between the Somme and the Loire around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in the Western Empire, a domain Gregory of Tours called the "Kingdom" of Soissons.
From 457 to 486, under Aegidius and his son Syagrius, Noviodunum was the capital of the Kingdom of Soissons, until it fell to the Frankish king Clovis I in 486 after the Battle of Soissons.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
Syagrius's defeat by king Clovis I of the Franks is considered the end of Western Roman rule outside of Italy.
Syagrius, who had managed to preserve Roman sovereignty in an exclave in northern Gaul (a realm today known as the Domain of Soissons) also recognized Nepos as his sovereign and the legitimate Western Emperor.

Battle of Soissons (486)

Battle of SoissonsdefeatedSoissons
Few details are known of the subsequent clash, the Battle of Soissons, but Syagrius was decisively defeated and fled.
The Battle of Soissons was fought in 486 between Frankish forces under Clovis I and the Gallo-Roman domain of Soissons under Syagrius.

Childeric I

ChildericChilderic I, King of the Salian FranksChilderick
Syagrius managed to hold off the neighbouring Salian Franks, who were internally divided under kings including Childeric.
(Childeric's son Clovis I later fought Aegidius' son Syagrius who was remembered as a King of Romans, and who had control of Soissons in the south of Belgica Secunda.)

Alaric II

AlaricAlaric II, King of the Visigoths
Toulouse was the capital of Alaric II, king of the Visigoths.
The earliest documented event in Alaric's reign concerned providing refuge to Syagrius, the former ruler of the Domain of Soissons (in what is now northwestern France) who had been defeated by Clovis I, King of the Franks.

Fall of the Western Roman Empire

decline of the Roman Empirefall of the Roman Empirefall of Rome
Syagrius preserved his father's territory between the Somme and the Loire around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in the Western Empire, a domain Gregory of Tours called the "Kingdom" of Soissons.
Syagrius son of Aegidius ruled the Domain of Soissons until his murder in 487.

Gallo-Roman culture

Gallo-RomanGallo-RomansRoman
Syagrius governed this Gallo-Roman enclave from the death of his father in 464 until 486, when he was defeated in battle by Clovis I.
Syagrius

Last of the Romans

the last of the Romanslast of the Roman generalslast Roman
Last of the Romans
Syagrius (430–486/487), the last Roman commander in Gaul (hailed as "King of the Romans") before the invasion of the Franks.

Rump state

rumpremnant staterump states
Syagrius (430 – 486 or 487) was the last Gallic military commander of a Roman rump state in northern Gaul, now called the Kingdom of Soissons.

Gaul

GallicGalliaGaulish
Syagrius (430 – 486 or 487) was the last Gallic military commander of a Roman rump state in northern Gaul, now called the Kingdom of Soissons. He inherited his position from his father, Aegidius, the last Roman magister militum per Gallias.

Gregory of Tours

GregorySt. Gregory of ToursHistory of the Franks
Gregory of Tours referred to him as King of the Romans. Syagrius preserved his father's territory between the Somme and the Loire around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in the Western Empire, a domain Gregory of Tours called the "Kingdom" of Soissons.

Magister militum

magistri militummagister peditummagister militum per Orientem
He inherited his position from his father, Aegidius, the last Roman magister militum per Gallias.

Somme (river)

Sommeriver SommeSomme River
Syagrius preserved his father's territory between the Somme and the Loire around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in the Western Empire, a domain Gregory of Tours called the "Kingdom" of Soissons.

Loire

River LoireLoire RiverLoire estuary
Syagrius preserved his father's territory between the Somme and the Loire around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in the Western Empire, a domain Gregory of Tours called the "Kingdom" of Soissons.

Godefroid Kurth

Kurth, Godefroi
Historians have mistrusted the title "rex Romanorum" that Gregory of Tours gave him, at least as early as Godefroid Kurth, who dismissed it as a gross error in 1893.

Truism

truisms
The common consensus has been to follow Kurth, based on the historical truism that Romans hated kingship from the days of the expulsion of Tarquin the Proud; for example, Syagrius' article in the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire omits this title, preferring to refer to him as a "Roman ruler (in North Gaul)".

Lucius Tarquinius Superbus

TarquinTarquin the ProudTarquinius Superbus
The common consensus has been to follow Kurth, based on the historical truism that Romans hated kingship from the days of the expulsion of Tarquin the Proud; for example, Syagrius' article in the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire omits this title, preferring to refer to him as a "Roman ruler (in North Gaul)".

Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire

PLREThe Prosopography of the Later Roman EmpireProsopography of the Later Roman Empire - Volume III: A.D. 527 – 641
The common consensus has been to follow Kurth, based on the historical truism that Romans hated kingship from the days of the expulsion of Tarquin the Proud; for example, Syagrius' article in the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire omits this title, preferring to refer to him as a "Roman ruler (in North Gaul)".

Salian Franks

SalianSalian FrankishSalii
Syagrius managed to hold off the neighbouring Salian Franks, who were internally divided under kings including Childeric.

Saxons

SaxonSaxonySaxones
However, it is known that Childeric had previously come to the aid of the Gallo-Romans, joining a certain officer named Paul in operations against Saxons who at one point seized Angers.

Angers

angevinAngiers, Francehistory
However, it is known that Childeric had previously come to the aid of the Gallo-Romans, joining a certain officer named Paul in operations against Saxons who at one point seized Angers.